lipid


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lip·id

 (lĭp′ĭd, lī′pĭd) also lip·ide (lĭp′īd′, lī′pīd′)
n.
Any of a group of organic compounds, including the fats, oils, waxes, sterols, and triglycerides, that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents, are oily to the touch, and together with carbohydrates and proteins constitute the principal structural material of living cells.

[French lipide : Greek lipos, fat; see lipo- + French -ide, -ide.]

lip·id′ic adj.

lipid

(ˈlaɪpɪd; ˈlɪpɪd) or

lipide

n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of a large group of organic compounds that are esters of fatty acids (simple lipids, such as fats and waxes) or closely related substances (compound lipids, such as phospholipids): usually insoluble in water but soluble in alcohol and other organic solvents. They are important structural materials in living organisms. Former name: lipoid
[C20: from French lipide, from Greek lipos fat]

lip•id

(ˈlɪp ɪd, ˈlaɪ pɪd)

also lip•ide

(-aɪd, -ɪd; -paɪd, -pɪd)

n.
any of a group of organic compounds comprising fats, waxes, and similar substances that are greasy, insoluble in water, and soluble in alcohol: one of the chief structural components of the living cell.
[< French lipide (1923) = Greek líp(os) fat + French -ide -id3]

lip·id

(lĭp′ĭd)
Any of a large group of organic compounds composed of fats and fatty compounds that are oily to the touch and insoluble in water. Lipids include fatty acids, oils, waxes, sterols, and triglycerides. They are a source of stored energy and are a component of cell membranes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lipid - an oily organic compound insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents; essential structural component of living cells (along with proteins and carbohydrates)
fat - a soft greasy substance occurring in organic tissue and consisting of a mixture of lipids (mostly triglycerides); "pizza has too much fat"
triglyceride - glyceride occurring naturally in animal and vegetable tissues; it consists of three individual fatty acids bound together in a single large molecule; an important energy source forming much of the fat stored by the body
macromolecule, supermolecule - any very large complex molecule; found only in plants and animals
oil - a slippery or viscous liquid or liquefiable substance not miscible with water
phospholipid - any of various compounds composed of fatty acids and phosphoric acid and a nitrogenous base; an important constituent of membranes
wax - any of various substances of either mineral origin or plant or animal origin; they are solid at normal temperatures and insoluble in water
Translations
lipidi
lípíð

lipid

[ˈlaɪpɪd] Nlípido m

lipid

[ˈlaɪpɪd] n (Biochemistry) → lipide m

lip·id

n. lípido, sustancia orgánica que no se disuelve en el agua pero que es soluble en alcohol, éter o cloroformo.

lipid

n lípido
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Study suggests that efforts should be made to reduce redundant lipid testing.