liquidness


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liq·uid

 (lĭk′wĭd)
n.
1.
a. The state of matter in which a substance exhibits a characteristic readiness to flow and little or no tendency to disperse, and is amorphous but has a fixed volume and is difficult to compress.
b. Matter or a specific body of matter in this state.
2. Linguistics A consonant articulated without friction and capable of being prolonged like a vowel, such as English l and r.
adj.
1. Of or being a liquid.
2. Having been liquefied, especially:
a. Melted by heating: liquid wax.
b. Condensed by cooling: liquid oxygen.
3. Flowing readily; fluid: added milk to make the batter more liquid.
4. Having a flowing quality without harshness or abrupt breaks: liquid prose; the liquid movements of a ballet dancer.
5. Linguistics Articulated without friction and capable of being prolonged like a vowel.
6. Clear and shining: the liquid brown eyes of a spaniel.
7. Existing as or readily convertible into cash: liquid assets.

[From Middle English, of a liquid, from Old French liquide, from Latin liquidus, from liquēre, to be liquid.]

liq′uid·ly adv.
liq′uid·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.liquidness - the state in which a substance exhibits a characteristic readiness to flow with little or no tendency to disperse and relatively high incompressibility
state of matter, state - (chemistry) the three traditional states of matter are solids (fixed shape and volume) and liquids (fixed volume and shaped by the container) and gases (filling the container); "the solid state of water is called ice"
2.liquidness - the property of flowing easily; "adding lead makes the alloy easier to cast because the melting point is reduced and the fluidity is increased"; "they believe that fluidity increases as the water gets warmer"
thinness - a consistency of low viscosity; "he disliked the thinness of the soup"
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The limited time offer which is stridently the highest yielding fixed term deposit in Qatar is also the most flexible tool for people observing mutually liquidness.
In "The Study of Poetry," Matthew Arnold wrote of the "power of liquidness and fluidity in Chaucer's verse .