litany


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lit·a·ny

 (lĭt′n-ē)
n. pl. lit·a·nies
1. Christianity A liturgical prayer consisting of a series of petitions recited by a leader alternating with fixed responses by the congregation.
2. A repetitive recital, series, or list: "the litany of layoffs in recent months by corporate giants" (Sylvia Nasar).

[Middle English letanie, from Old French, from Medieval Latin letanīa, from Late Latin litanīa, from Late Greek litaneia, from Greek, entreaty, from litaneuein, to entreat, from litanos, entreating, from litē, supplication.]

litany

(ˈlɪtənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity
a. a form of prayer consisting of a series of invocations, each followed by an unvarying response
b. the Litany the general supplication in this form included in the Book of Common Prayer
2. any long or tedious speech or recital
[C13: via Old French from Medieval Latin litanīa from Late Greek litaneia prayer, ultimately from Greek litē entreaty]

lit•a•ny

(ˈlɪt n i)

n., pl. -nies.
1. a ceremonial or liturgical form of prayer consisting of a series of invocations or supplications with responses.
2. a prolonged or tedious account: a whole litany of complaints.
[before 900; Middle English letanie, Old English letanīa < Medieval Latin, Late Latin litanīa < Late Greek litaneía litany, Greek: entreaty, n. derivative of litaínein or litaneúein to pray]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.litany - any long and tedious address or recital; "the patient recited a litany of complaints"; "a litany of failures"
speech, address - the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience; "he listened to an address on minor Roman poets"
2.Litany - a prayer consisting of a series of invocations by the priest with responses from the congregation
Book of Common Prayer - the Anglican service book of the Church of England; has had several revisions since the Reformation and is widely admired for the dignity and beauty of its language

litany

noun
1. recital, list, tale, catalogue, account, repetition, refrain, recitation, enumeration She listened to the litany of complaints against her client.
2. prayer, petition, invocation, supplication, set words She recited a litany in an unknown tongue.

litany

noun
A formula of words used in praying:
collect, orison, prayer, rogation (often used in plural).
Translations

litany

[ˈlɪtənɪ] Nletanía f

litany

[ˈlɪtəni] n
(= prayer) → litanie f
(fig) (= stream) a litany of complaints → une litanie de plaintes

litany

nLitanei f

litany

[ˈlɪtənɪ] nlitania
References in classic literature ?
it was a pious, strange litany in praise of the adored and censed ass.
The voice in the dark began intoning a mad litany, line by line, and I and the rest to repeat it.
When he had finished the Litany the deacon crossed the stole over his breast and said, "Let us commit ourselves and our whole lives to Christ the Lord
For three times in the day the new sun-worshipper went out on his little balcony, in the face of all Westminster, to say some litany to his shining lord: once at daybreak, once at sunset, and once at the shock of noon.
Soon the moans that accompanied this sort of love's litany increased and increased.
He made eyes at her, was taken with sudden coughs and "hems," smiled, smirked and went brazenly through the impudent and contemptible litany of the "masher.
The psalms, the prayers, the Litany, and the sermon were all reduced to one chanting sound which paused, and then renewed itself, a little higher or a little lower.
The first to halt were those who were carrying the image, and one of the four ecclesiastics who were chanting the Litany, struck by the strange figure of Don Quixote, the leanness of Rocinante, and the other ludicrous peculiarities he observed, said in reply to him, "Brother, if you have anything to say to us say it quickly, for these brethren are whipping themselves, and we cannot stop, nor is it reasonable we should stop to hear anything, unless indeed it is short enough to be said in two words.
In low, thick, smothered accents--in a wild litany of her own--she prayed.
Remember the prayer of our holy litany, where we implore the Divine Power—’that it may please thee to forgive our enemies, persecutors, and slanderers, and to turn their hearts.
It cost her a litany of pictured sorrows and of silent cries that she might be the mercy for those sorrows-- but the resolved submission did come; and when the house was still, and she knew that it was near the time when Mr.
and Haley relieved himself by repeating over a not very select litany of imprecations on himself, which, though there was the best possible reason to consider them as true, we shall, as a matter of taste, omit.