literatim


Also found in: Legal.

lit·er·a·tim

 (lĭt′ə-rā′tĭm, -rä′-)
adv.
Letter for letter: a word transcribed literatim.

[Medieval Latin līterātim, litterātim, from Latin littera, lītera, letter; see letter.]

literatim

(ˌlɪtəˈrɑːtɪm)
adv
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) letter for letter
[C17: from Medieval Latin, from Latin littera letter]

lit•e•ra•tim

(ˌlɪt əˈreɪ tɪm)

adv.
letter-for-letter; literally.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin līterātim = Latin līterāt(us) (see literate) + -im adv. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.literatim - letter for letter; "the message was transcribed literatim"
Translations

literatim

adv (form)Buchstabe für Buchstabe
References in periodicals archive ?
Because what I have written heretofore has been taken verbatim et literatim and a character given me to which I am no more entitled than the man in the moon; I am credited with being "great," "powerful," and finally crowned as "good.
The text is a literatim copy of the OE manuscript (see also Ciszek 2008 a and b).
Baker, Houston, 1984, Blues, Ideology and Afro-American Literatim, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Because these records are literatim transcripts local and regional features of language are preserved within them.
Luca Cumani, trainer of Literatim "It's a difficult race with lots of runners, but he is well.
The seven-year-old, trained by Terry Mills, showed that he was still a force to be reckoned with by defying top weight of 10st at Sandown last month when beating Literatim by three-quarters of a length.
The seven-year-old, trained by Terry Mills, showed that he is still a force to be reckoned with by defying top weight of 10st at Sandown last month when beating Literatim by a three-quarters of a length.
This evidence showed that he was not a literatim copyist, but one whose copies were strongly marked by his local dialect.
It is often possible to define a scribe's behaviour fairly precisely, either as translation, literatim copying, or constrained selection, the latter admitting of varying degrees of tolerance.
A drift in the opposite direction, from translation to literatim copying, also seems to take place from time to time, and has been shown by J.
Ladbrokes: 7 Literatim, 9 Adakail, Calcutta, Flighty Fellow, Welcome Stranger, 10 Dunaskin, Mystic Man, 11 Nashaab, 12 Mr Moh, Pango, Selective, 14 Penrith, Vicious Warrior, 16 Miss Ivanhoe, Vicious Knight, 18 Northern Desert, 22 Dark Charm, 25 Kelucia, 40 Crafty Fancy.
The appearance of a literatim copyist at this date is of interest, in the light of observations by Jeremy Smith (1991: 54) and Margaret Laing (1991: 38-42) that the Early Middle English period shows the breakdown of Late West Saxon habits of literatim copying, in favour of scribal translation.