lithosphere


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

lith·o·sphere

 (lĭth′ə-sfîr′)
n.
The outer part of the earth, consisting of the crust and upper mantle, about 100 kilometers (62 miles) thick.

lithosphere

(ˈlɪθəˌsfɪə)
n
(Geological Science) the rigid outer layer of the earth, having an average thickness of about 75 km and comprising the earth's crust and the solid part of the mantle above the asthenosphere

lith•o•sphere

(ˈlɪθ əˌsfɪər)

n.
the crust and upper mantle of the earth.
[1885–90]
lith`o•spher′ic (-ˈsfɛr ɪk) adj.

lith·o·sphere

(lĭth′ə-sfîr′)
The outer part of the Earth, consisting of the crust and upper mantle. It is approximately 62 miles (100 kilometers) thick. Compare asthenosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere.

lithosphere

the solid part of the earth, as contrasted with the atmosphere and hydrosphere.
See also: Earth

lithosphere

The term used to describe the Earth’s crust coupled with the rigid upper mantle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lithosphere - the solid part of the earth consisting of the crust and outer mantlelithosphere - the solid part of the earth consisting of the crust and outer mantle
layer - a relatively thin sheetlike expanse or region lying over or under another
crust, Earth's crust - the outer layer of the Earth
earth, globe, world - the 3rd planet from the sun; the planet we live on; "the Earth moves around the sun"; "he sailed around the world"
mantle - the layer of the earth between the crust and the core
Earth's surface, surface - the outermost level of the land or sea; "earthquakes originate far below the surface"; "three quarters of the Earth's surface is covered by water"
References in periodicals archive ?
The second theory is thermal runaway: Increasing temperatures weaken rocks, promoting slippage that spreads through the lithosphere, further increasing temperatures and causing more rocks to slip, resulting in an earthquake.
Earth and environmental scientists explore some of the ways that climate warming since the Last Glacial Maximum, some 20,000 years ago, has triggered geological events, primarily because of the shift in weight on the lithosphere as stationary glaciers melt and become moving oceans.
northern limit of penetration of the subducted Indian lithosphere beneath the Asian Tibetan crust.
This movement forces layers of the lithosphere to peel away and sink.
When it rises from below, this less-dense layer infiltrates the stiffer crust above and then freezes, weakening the lithosphere and eventually chiseling chunks of rock away.
Forming at sites of subduction of the oceanic lithosphere due to plate tectonics, accretionary systems are magmatic arc systems along with material accreted from the down going plate and eroded from the upper plate and are important in generating, recycling, and maturing continental crust.
Imaging, Mapping and Modelling Continental Lithosphere Extension and Breakup
Well subsidence histories indicate folding or flexure of the continental crust caused by contraction of the lithosphere which appears to be responsible for Eocene-Miocene basin subsidence.
1994, Measurement and monitoring system for deformation investigation of lithosphere of natura and engineering objects in Sudety Mountains, Proceed.
Recent laboratory studies have demonstrated changes in deformation mechanism at sub-seafloor depths where faults in the brittle lithosphere flatten out into zones of plastic deformation in hotter, deeper rocks.
Their topics include probing crustal thickness evolution and geodynamic processes in the past from magma records: an integrated approach, the exhumation of Western Alboran peridotites in an Oligocene-Miocene oblique continental rift system, crust-mantle boundary in eastern North America from the (oldest) craton to the (youngest) rift, the role of percolating melts in Antarctic subcontinental lithosphere mantle: new insights from Handler Ridge mantle xenoliths in northern Victoria Land, and detrital zircon evidence for eclogite formation by basal subduction erosion: an example from the Yukon-Tanana composite arc in the Canadian Cordillera.
This is a key question in the planet's evolution as biological activity plays a major role in its hydrosphere, atmosphere and lithosphere.