lithotripsy

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lith·o·trip·sy

 (lĭth′ə-trĭp′sē)
n. pl. lith·o·trip·sies
Pulverization of kidney stones or gallstones by means of a lithotripter.

[litho- + Greek trīpsis, a rubbing, pounding (from trībein, to rub, pound; see lithotripter) + -y.]

lithotripsy

(ˈlɪθəʊˌtrɪpsɪ)
n
(Medicine) the use of ultrasound, often generated by a lithotripter, to pulverize kidney stones and gallstones in situ
[C20: from litho- + Greek thruptein to crush]

lith•o•trip•sy

(ˈlɪθ əˌtrɪp si)

n., pl. -sies.
the pulverization of one or more stones in the body by means of a lithotripter.
[1825–35; litho- + Greek trîps(is) rubbing, wear + -y3]
Translations

lith·o·trip·sy

, lithotrity
n. litotripsia, trituración de cálculos en el riñón, el uréter, la vejiga y la vesícula biliar.

lithotripsy

n litotricia; extracorporeal shock wave — litotricia extracorpórea por ondas de choque
References in periodicals archive ?
Ureteroscopic lithotripsy for distal ureteral calculi: comparative evaluation of three different lithotriptors.
An Olympus CHF T 20 flexible choledochoscope and an Olympus UES 10 electrocauter, with various balloon and basket catheters, lithotriptors, biopsy and cytology forceps, and coagulation electrodes.
Other synergistic applications include liposuction, lithotriptors, and suture welding.
Orthopedic lithotriptors are adaptations of machines used to pulverize kidney stones.
Lithotriptors direct high-energy shock waves into the body to disintegrate kidney stones into pieces as small as grains of sand without surgery.
This device was very quickly supplanted by more advanced Dornier machines as well as by lithotriptors made by other manufacturers.
These pediatric cystoscopes complement an entire family of adult urologic products, including flexible cystonephroscopes, rotating and slender resectoscopes, pneumatic lithotriptors, flexible ureteroscopes, percutaneous nephroscopes, and a variety of instrument accessories.
From lithotriptors that break down kidney stones to magnetic-resonance imaging machines, almost any medical service invented can be found in at least one of the region's 13 hospitals.
During the same period the first generation of lithotriptors appeared; these machines disintegrate kidney stones by means of shock waves applied from outside the body, usually without any surgery being necessary.
The lithotriptor was approved for widespread clinical use in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration in December 1984, at which time six experimental sites had lithotriptors (Bloom et al.