litigious


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

li·ti·gious

 (lĭ-tĭj′əs)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characterized by litigation.
2. Tending to engage in lawsuits.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin lītigiōsus, from lītigium, dispute, from lītigāre, to quarrel; see litigate.]

li·ti′gious·ly adv.
li·ti′gious·ness n.

litigious

(lɪˈtɪdʒəs)
adj
1. (Law) excessively ready to go to law
2. (Law) of or relating to litigation
3. inclined to dispute or disagree
[C14: from Latin lītigiōsus quarrelsome, from lītigium strife]
liˈtigiously adv
liˈtigiousness n

li•ti•gious

(lɪˈtɪdʒ əs)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to litigation.
2. subject or open to litigation.
3. inclined to litigate: a litigious person.
4. inclined to dispute or disagree; argumentative.
[1350–1400; < Latin lītigiōsus contentious <lītigi(um) a quarrel (see litigate, -ium1)]
li•ti′gious•ly, adv.
li•ti′gious•ness, li•ti`gi•os′i•ty (-ˌtɪdʒ iˈɒs ɪ ti) n.

litigious

Tending to initiate lawsuits frequently or too readily.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.litigious - of or relating to litigation
2.litigious - inclined or showing an inclination to dispute or disagree, even to engage in law suits; "a style described as abrasive and contentious"; "a disputatious lawyer"; "a litigious and acrimonious spirit"
argumentative - given to or characterized by argument; "an argumentative discourse"; "argumentative to the point of being cantankerous"; "an intelligent but argumentative child"

litigious

adjective contentious, belligerent, argumentative, quarrelsome, disputatious They are probably the most litigious people in the world.

litigious

adjective
Translations

litigious

[lɪˈtɪdʒəs] ADJlitigioso

litigious

adjprozesssüchtig; a litigious personjd, der ständig Prozesse führt, ein Prozesshansel m (inf)
References in classic literature ?
The physician with his theory, rather obtained from than corrected by experiments on the human constitution; the pious, self- denying, laborious, and ill-paid missionary; the half-educated, litigious, envious, and disreputable lawyer, with his counterpoise, a brother of the profession, of better origin and of better character; the shiftless, bargaining, discontented seller of his “betterments;” the plausible carpenter, and most of the others, are more familiar to all who have ever dwelt in a new country.
I wish to represent myself to her through you, because she has a great esteem and respect for her cousin John; and I know you will soften the course I take, even though you disapprove of it; and-- and in short," said Richard, who had been hesitating through these words, "I--I don't like to represent myself in this litigious, contentious, doubting character to a confiding girl like Ada,"
They were by sheer preoccupation with that a peaceful people, more particularly after Wilkes, the house agent, driven by some obsolete dream of acquisition, had been drowned in the pool by the ruined gas-works for making inquiries into title and displaying a litigious turn of mind.
Well, my dear sir, Taboureau the laborer, an obliging, hard-working, good-natured fellow, used to lend a helping hand to any one who asked him; but as his gains have increased MONSIEUR Taboureau has become litigious, arrogant, and somewhat given to sharp practice.
obstetricians had experienced a litigious event, and the median award for "negligence in birth care" was $2.
TEACHERS who offer private tuition are being advised to take out insurance to protect themselves against litigious parents, unions have warned.
I wasn't looking to be litigious or to blame anyone," she said.
When it comes to divorce, emotions and the desire to be litigious often run high.
American Idol judge SIMON COWELL, talking about Clay Aiken's litigious fans, as quoted by World Entertainment News, March 20
Today's litigious environment brings real estate agents face to face with increased risk that they will face claims of errors and omissions (E&O).
Litigious societies are also subject to corruption.
Charles wrote to complain the Human Rights Act would make people more litigious.