live up to


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Related to live up to: settle in, look down on, liven up, brush up, at first

live 1

 (lĭv)
v. lived, liv·ing, lives
v.intr.
1. To be alive; exist.
2. To continue to be alive: lived through a bad accident.
3. To support oneself; subsist: living on rice and fish; lives on a small inheritance.
4. To reside; dwell: lives on a farm.
5. To conduct one's life in a particular manner: lived frugally.
6. To pursue a positive, satisfying existence; enjoy life: those who truly live.
7. To remain in human memory: an event that lives on in our minds.
v.tr.
1. To spend or pass (one's life).
2. To go through; experience: lived a nightmare.
3. To practice in one's life: live one's beliefs.
Phrasal Verbs:
live down
To overcome or reduce the shame of (a misdeed, for example) over a period of time.
live in
To reside in the place where one is employed: household servants who live in.
live out
To live outside one's place of domestic employment: household servants who live out.
live with
To put up with; resign oneself to: disliked the situation but had to live with it.
Idioms:
live it up Slang
To engage in festive pleasures or extravagances.
live off/on the fat of the land
To enjoy the best of everything; live in comfort or luxury.
live up to
1. To live or act in accordance with: lived up to their parents' ideals.
2. To prove equal to: a new technology that did not live up to our expectations.
3. To carry out; fulfill: lived up to her end of the bargain.

[Middle English liven, from Old English libban, lifian; see leip- in Indo-European roots.]

live 2

 (līv)
adj.
1. Having life; alive: live animals. See Synonyms at living.
2. Of, related to, or occurring during the life of one that is living: a live birth; the live weight of an animal before being slaughtered.
3. Of current interest or relevance: a live topic; still a live option.
4. Informal Full of life, excitement, or activity; lively: a live crowd at the parade; a live party.
5. Glowing; burning: live coals.
6. Not yet exploded but capable of being fired: live ammunition.
7. Electricity Carrying an electric current or energized with electricity: live cables lying dangerously on the ground.
8. Not mined or quarried; in the natural state: live ore.
9.
a. Broadcast while actually being performed; not taped, filmed, or recorded: a live television program.
b. Involving performers or spectators who are physically present: live entertainment; a live audience.
10. Of, relating to, or containing living bacteria or active viruses, sometimes in an attenuated form: live yogurt cultures; a live measles vaccine.
11. Printing Not yet set into type: live copy.
12. Sports In play: a live ball.
adv.
At, during, or from the time of actual occurrence or performance: The landing on the moon was telecast live.

[Short for alive.]

live′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.live up to - meet the requirements or expectations of
conform to, fit, meet - satisfy a condition or restriction; "Does this paper meet the requirements for the degree?"
suffice, answer, do, serve - be sufficient; be adequate, either in quality or quantity; "A few words would answer"; "This car suits my purpose well"; "Will $100 do?"; "A 'B' grade doesn't suffice to get me into medical school"; "Nothing else will serve"
cover - provide for; "The grant doesn't cover my salary"
Translations
يَعيش حَسَب أو طِبْقا لِ
žít v souladu s
leve op til
megfelelõen élméltó
lifa í samræmi viî
žiť v súlade s
gerçekleştirmeklayık olmak

w>live up to

vi +prep obj the holiday (esp Brit) or vacation (US) lived up to (my) expectations/the advertiser’s claimsder Urlaub hielt, was ich mir davon versprochen hatte/was die Werbung versprochen hatte; sales have not lived up to expectationsdie Verkaufszahlen entsprachen nicht den Erwartungen; to live up to standards/one’s reputationden Anforderungen/seinem Ruf gerecht werden; the reality never lives up to the anticipationdie Wirklichkeit kommt nie an die Erwartungen heran; the holiday didn’t live up to our hopesder Urlaub entsprach nicht dem, was wir uns (dat)erhofft hatten; he’s got a lot to live up toin ihn werden große Erwartungen gesetzt; if he wants to emulate his father he’s got a lot to live up toer hat sich (dat)ein hohes Ziel gesteckt, wenn er seinem Vater nacheifern will; you should live up to your father’s principlesdu solltest die Grundsätze deines Vaters anstreben; I doubt whether he can live up to his brother’s successich bezweifle, dass er so erfolgreich wie sein Bruder wird

live1

(liv) verb
1. to have life; to be alive. This poison is dangerous to everything that lives.
2. to survive. The doctors say he is very ill, but they think he will live.; It was difficult to believe that she had lived through such an experience.
3. to have one's home or dwelling (in a particular place). She lives next to the church.; They went to live in Bristol / in a huge house.
4. to pass (one's life). He lived a life of luxury.; She lives in fear of being attacked.
5. (with by) to make enough money etc to feed and house oneself. He lives by fishing.
-lived adjective
having (a certain type of) life. long-lived.
ˈliving adjective
1. having life; being alive. a living creature; The aim of the project was to discover if there was anything living on Mars.
2. now alive. the greatest living artist.
noun
the money etc needed to feed and house oneself and keep oneself alive. He earns his living driving a taxi; She makes a good living as an author.
ˈliving-room noun
the room of a house etc in which the occupants of the house usually sit during their leisure time.
live-in adjective
living in the same place with a sexual partner without being married to him/her. a live-in partner/boyfriend.
live and let live
to tolerate other people's actions and expect them to tolerate one's own.
live down
to live through the shame of (a foolish act etc) till it is forgotten.
live in/out
to have one's home at, away from, the place where one works. All the hotel staff live in; The nurse chose to live out.
live on
1. to keep oneself alive by eating. He lives on fish and potatoes.
2. to be supported (financially) by. He lives on $40 a week.
live up to
to behave in a manner worthy of. He found it difficult to live up to his reputation as a hero.
(with)in living memory
within a period recent enough to be remembered by someone still alive. It was the worst harvest in living memory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spanier said UPS failed to live up to promises made at the time of the acquisition of Mail Boxes Etc.
This a recurring behavior for Baca - refusing to live up to his responsibilities unless he gets more money.
Carey said the union will continue to collect reports of the company's failure to live up to the agreement it signed.