livery


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Related to livery: livery stable, livery company

liv·er·y

 (lĭv′ə-rē, lĭv′rē)
n. pl. liv·er·ies
1. A distinctive uniform worn by the male servants of a household.
2. The distinctive dress worn by the members of a particular group; uniform: ushers in livery.
3. The costume or insignia worn by the retainers of a feudal lord.
4.
a. The boarding and care of horses for a fee.
b. The hiring out of horses and carriages.
c. A livery stable.
5. A business that offers vehicles, such as automobiles or boats, for hire.
6. Law Official delivery of property, especially land, to a new owner.

[Middle English liveri, from Old French livree, delivery, from feminine past participle of livrer, to deliver, from Latin līberāre, to free, from līber, free; see leudh- in Indo-European roots.]

livery

(ˈlɪvərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. (Clothing & Fashion) the identifying uniform, badge, etc, of a member of a guild or one of the servants of a feudal lord
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a uniform worn by some menservants and chauffeurs
3. an individual or group that wears such a uniform
4. (Clothing & Fashion) distinctive dress or outward appearance
5. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège)
a. the stabling, keeping, or hiring out of horses for money
b. (as modifier): a livery horse.
6. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) at livery being kept in a livery stable
7. (Law) legal history an ancient method of conveying freehold land
[C14: via Anglo-French from Old French livrée allocation, from livrer to hand over, from Latin līberāre to set free]

livery

(ˈlɪvərɪ)
adj
1. of or resembling liver
2. (Pathology) another word for liverish

liv•er•y1

(ˈlɪv ə ri, ˈlɪv ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. a distinctive uniform, badge, or device formerly provided by someone of rank or title for his or her retainers.
2. a uniform worn by servants.
3. distinctive attire worn by an official, a member of a company or guild, etc.
4. any of various companies of the City of London descended from medieval guilds and formerly characterized by such livery.
5. characteristic dress, garb, or outward appearance: the green livery of summer.
6. the care, feeding, stabling, etc., of horses for pay.
8. a company that rents out automobiles, boats, etc.
9. Law. an ancient method of conveying a freehold by formal delivery of possession.
[1250–1300; Middle English livere < Anglo-French, < Old French livree allowance (of food, clothing, etc.), n. use of feminine past participle of livrer to give over < Latin līberāre]

liv•er•y2

(ˈlɪv ə ri)

adj.
[1770–80; liver1 + -y1]

livery

- A company's distinctive color scheme or emblem on vehicles is called the livery; livery first referred to the dispensing of clothes, food, or provisions to servants.
See also related terms for servants.

Livery

 retainers collectively, 1413.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.livery - uniform worn by some menservants and chauffeurslivery - uniform worn by some menservants and chauffeurs
uniform - clothing of distinctive design worn by members of a particular group as a means of identification
2.livery - the voluntary transfer of something (title or possession) from one party to another
surrender - the delivery of a principal into lawful custody
conveyance of title, conveyancing, conveying, conveyance - act of transferring property title from one person to another
bailment - the delivery of personal property in trust by the bailor to the bailee
3.livery - the care (feeding and stabling) of horses for pay
care, tending, attention, aid - the work of providing treatment for or attending to someone or something; "no medical care was required"; "the old car needs constant attention"
Adj.1.livery - suffering from or suggesting a liver disorder or gastric distresslivery - suffering from or suggesting a liver disorder or gastric distress
ill, sick - affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function; "ill from the monotony of his suffering"

livery

noun costume, dress, clothing, suit, uniform, attire, garb, regalia, vestments, raiment (archaic or poetic) She was attended by servants in special livery.
Translations
livrej
livreeluovutusomaisuuspukeavaatettaa
livreja
livrea
livré
ліврея

livery

[ˈlɪvərɪ]
A. Nlibrea f (liter) → ropaje m
B. CPD livery company N (Brit) → gremio m (antiguo de la Ciudad de Londres)
livery stable Ncuadra f de caballos de alquiler

livery

[ˈlɪvəri] nlivrée f

livery

nLivree f; (fig liter)Kleid nt

livery

:
livery company
nZunft f
livery stable
nMietstall m

livery

[ˈlɪvərɪ] nlivrea
References in classic literature ?
For a minute or two she stood looking at the house, and wondering what to do next, when suddenly a footman in livery came running out of the wood--(she considered him to be a footman because he was in livery: otherwise, judging by his face only, she would have called him a fish)--and rapped loudly at the door with his knuckles.
Mousqueton had a magnificent livery, and enjoyed the satisfaction of which he had been ambitious all his life--that of standing behind a gilded carriage.
Yes, monsieur, it is here he lives," the servant replied to Planchet, who was not in livery.
She had been buggy-riding before, but always behind one horse, jaded, and livery, in a top-buggy, heavy and dingy, such as livery stables rent because of sturdy unbreakableness.
I was received by a solemn man-servant out of livery, was informed that the family had retired for the night, and was then led into a large and lofty room where my supper was awaiting me, in a forlorn manner, at one extremity of a lonesome mahogany wilderness of dining-table.
You muthn't mind your thon having a comic livery on.
In a preposterous coat, like a beadle's, with cuffs and flaps exaggerated to an unspeakable extent; in an immense waistcoat, knee-breeches, buckled shoes, and a mad cocked hat; with nothing fitting him, and everything of coarse material, moth-eaten and full of holes; with seams in his black face, where fear and heat had started through the greasy composition daubed all over it; anything so grimly, detestably, ridiculously shameful as the whelp in his comic livery, Mr.
I don't mean that he thould go in the comic livery,' said Sleary.
So Louis and I rendezvoused in a livery stable, and with coats buttoned and chattering teeth played euchre and casino until the time of our exile was over.
Prince John stepped from his royal seat to view more nearly the persons of these chosen yeomen, several of whom wore the royal livery.
These twenty nobles,'' he said, ``which, with the bugle, thou hast fairly won, are thine own; we will make them fifty, if thou wilt take livery and service with us as a yeoman of our body guard, and be near to our person.