living will


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Related to living will: living trust, Durable power of attorney

living will

n.
A document in which the signer states his or her wishes regarding medical treatment that sustains or prolongs life, especially by invasive or extraordinary means, for use if the signer becomes mentally incompetent or unable to communicate.

living will

n
(Law) a document stating that if its author becomes terminally ill, his or her life should not be prolonged by artificial means, such as a life-support machine

liv′ing will′


n.
a document in which a person stipulates that no extraordinary measures are to be used to prolong his or her life in the event of a terminal illness.
[1965–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.living will - a document written by someone still legally capable requesting that he should be allowed to die if subsequently severely disabled or suffering terminal illnessliving will - a document written by someone still legally capable requesting that he should be allowed to die if subsequently severely disabled or suffering terminal illness; "after he discovered he had AIDS he drew up a living will"
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

liv·ing will

n. testamento hecho por una persona en completo estado de salud en el que dispone que en caso de peligro de muerte no se use ningún medio artificial para prolongarle la vida.

living will

n testamento vital
References in periodicals archive ?
163) This change was likely a welcome surprise to "midsize firms" that felt their structures did not necessitate the same living will requirements as large complex institutions.
Healthy and critically ill patients who have a living will or a DNR order are at risk of not receiving the life-saving treatment that in fact they desire," study author Dr.
Of course, simply mandating that systemically important financial firms have a living will in place does not guarantee that the will is going to be beneficial.
A living will, also known as a healthcare proxy, is a document that allows people to express their wishes regarding specific medical treatments in the event that they are dying, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to communicate their preferences.
Research suggests that the living will can be used very effectively in medicine provided it is implemented and executed in such a manner as to avoid falling prey to some of its more pressing criticisms.
In "A Life That Matters," the Schindlers write that "many people believe that a living will or some form of advanced health care directive is the answer to the tragedies in life such as Terri suffered.
When my mother was dying of cancer, even though she had signed Do-Not-Resuscitate/Comfort-Care-Only papers and we'd had explicit discussions about her living will, I feared I wouldn't have the strength simply to sit by her side if she were to have a heart attack.
A living will is a legally-binding document which sets out exactly how a person wants to be treated if and when he or she is unable to communicate his or her medical wishes any more.
In fact, the importance of having a living will became the main take-home message of this conflict.
Instead, for the purposes of the living will you are legally in a "terminal condition" even if your life could be saved - - so as to live indefinitely - - by medical treatment, as long as you would still have a permanent disability of some kind.
A living will says if, for example, you are in a coma or incapable of making decisions another person can be given authority to make those decisions on your behalf.
Moreover, even when completed, the living will may not be specific enough to guide complex end-of-life decisions.