living will


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Related to living will: living trust, Durable power of attorney

living will

n.
A document in which the signer states his or her wishes regarding medical treatment that sustains or prolongs life, especially by invasive or extraordinary means, for use if the signer becomes mentally incompetent or unable to communicate.

living will

n
(Law) a document stating that if its author becomes terminally ill, his or her life should not be prolonged by artificial means, such as a life-support machine

liv′ing will′


n.
a document in which a person stipulates that no extraordinary measures are to be used to prolong his or her life in the event of a terminal illness.
[1965–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.living will - a document written by someone still legally capable requesting that he should be allowed to die if subsequently severely disabled or suffering terminal illnessliving will - a document written by someone still legally capable requesting that he should be allowed to die if subsequently severely disabled or suffering terminal illness; "after he discovered he had AIDS he drew up a living will"
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

liv·ing will

n. testamento hecho por una persona en completo estado de salud en el que dispone que en caso de peligro de muerte no se use ningún medio artificial para prolongarle la vida.

living will

n testamento vital
References in periodicals archive ?
However, your family member can look at your living will and make decisions based on that.
Neher does not address the purpose of the living will.
The right to life movement used to oppose living will legislation on the grounds, among others, that living wills are unnecessary - - that patients, families, and doctors can make appropriate decisions without them.
People who want a living will can obtain samples from a hospital or their state department on aging -- most states have living-will legislation, but provisions differ, she said -- and the American Medical Association "puts out a very good living will, quite detailed.
One patient with Alzheimer's disease used a living will to tell her New York City nursing home that she did not want any artificial nutrition or hydration while she died.
Jerry has completed and filed a living will and durable power of attorney for health care--he keeps a copy at home, with Carla's physician, and with the hospital where Carla is most likely to be treated.
AARP position: Patients should be treated with dignity and respect, and be permitted to refuse medical treatment, regardless of whether the refusal is in the form of an advance directive or living will.
The correspondents' "progressive living will" may be an excellent thing, but it does not seem to us to be a living will because it does not primarily address this problem.
Unfortunately, she did not leave instructions in a living will.
For example, you can create a legal will; a living trust--either a basic one or an AB, also known as a living trust with marital life estate; or a living will, also called a healthcare directive.
The bill's vague language will mean any end of life service could be denied and ignored, regardless of the patient's living will and advance directives, which provide instructions for exactly how to address end of life care issues.
A living will is a document that sets out a person's advance decisions as to medical care and treatment in the event they become seriously ill and lose their capacity.