loading


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load·ing

 (lō′dĭng)
n.
1. A weight placed on something else; a burden.
2. A substance added to something else; a filler.
3. An addition to an insurance premium.
4. Electricity The addition of inductance to a transmission line to improve its transmission characteristics.

loading

(ˈləʊdɪŋ)
n
1. a load or burden; weight
2. (Electrical Engineering) the addition of an inductance to electrical equipment, such as a transmission line or aerial, to improve its performance. See loading coil
3. (Insurance) an addition to an insurance premium to cover expenses, provide a safer profit margin, etc
4. (Aeronautics) the ratio of the gross weight of an aircraft to its engine power (power loading), wing area (wing loading), or some other parameter, or of the gross weight of a helicopter to its rotor disc area (disc loading)
5. (Psychology) psychol the correlation of a factor, such as a personality trait, with a performance score derived from a psychological test
6. (Elements & Compounds) material, such as china clay or size, added to paper, textiles, or similar materials to produce a smooth surface, increase weight, etc
7. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) Austral and NZ a payment made in addition to a basic wage or salary to reward special skills, compensate for unfavourable conditions, etc

load•ing

(ˈloʊ dɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of one that loads.
2. that with which something is loaded; burden, or charge.
3. the ratio of the gross weight of an airplane to engine power, wing span, or wing area.
4. an addition to the net premium of an insurance policy, to cover expenses and allow a margin for contingencies and profit.
[1425–75]

loading

The process of putting personnel, materiel, supplies and other freight on board ships, aircraft, trains, road vehicles, or other means of conveyance. See also embarkation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loading - weight to be borne or conveyedloading - weight to be borne or conveyed  
burthen - a variant of `burden'
dead load - a constant load on a structure (e.g. a bridge) due to the weight of the supported structure itself
live load, superload - a variable load on a structure (e.g. a bridge) such as moving traffic
millstone - any load that is difficult to carry
overburden, overload - an excessive burden
overload - an electrical load that exceeds the available electrical power
weight - an artifact that is heavy
2.loading - a quantity that can be processed or transported at one time; "the system broke down under excessive loads"
indefinite quantity - an estimated quantity
trainload - quantity that can be carried by a train
3.loading - the ratio of the gross weight of an airplane to some factor determining its lift
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
power loading - the ratio of the weight of an airplane to its engine power
span loading - the ratio of the weight of an airplane to its wingspan
wing loading - the ratio of the weight of an airplane to its wing area
4.loading - goods carried by a large vehicleloading - goods carried by a large vehicle  
merchandise, product, ware - commodities offered for sale; "good business depends on having good merchandise"; "that store offers a variety of products"
5.loading - the labor of putting a load of something on or in a vehicle or ship or container etc.; "the loading took 2 hours"
handling - manual (or mechanical) carrying or moving or delivering or working with something
unloading - the labor of taking a load of something off of or out of a vehicle or ship or container etc.
Translations
arc-boutementchargement

loading

[ˈləʊdɪŋ]
A. N (Insurance) → sobreprima f
B. CPD loading bay, loading dock Nárea m de carga y descarga

loading

[ˈləʊdɪŋ] nchargement mloading bay naire f de chargementloading ramp nrampe f de chargement

loading

:
loading bay
nLadeplatz m
loading bridge
nVerladebrücke f; (Aviat) → Fluggastbrücke f

load·ing

n. carga por administración de una sustancia en una prueba metabólica;
___ testprueba de carga.
References in classic literature ?
Away in the distance a train whistled and the men loading the boxes into the cars worked with re- newed activity.
He kept a whole row of pipes there ready loaded, stuck in a rack, within easy reach of his hand; and, whenever he turned in, he smoked them all out in succession, lighting one from the other to the end of the chapter; then loading them again to be in readiness anew.
It was only yesterday," said George, "as I was busy loading stones into a cart, that young Mas'r Tom stood there, slashing his whip so near the horse that the creature was frightened.
The solemnity is simple; the five corps assemble at night, and at a signal they all fall loading themselves with beer, out of pint-mugs, as fast as possible, and each man keeps his own count--usually by laying aside a lucifer match for each mud he empties.
There were no loud songs heard from those engaged in loading and unloading ships.
Joseph is loading lime on the further side of Penistone Crags; it will take him till dark, and he'll never know.
Nothing was needed but this; the wretched man, after loading wretched me with his gold and silver chains for years, had risked his life to come to me, and I held it there in my keeping
Hunter brought the boat round under the stern-port, and Joyce and I set to work loading her with powder tins, muskets, bags of biscuits, kegs of pork, a cask of cognac, and my invaluable medicine chest.
Ah,' said he, 'the King's daughter shall not overreach us;' and, loading his gun, he shot so cleverly, that he shot away the horse's skull from under the runner's head, without its hurting him.
One evening, under a calm sky, amid the silence and peace of that rural haven, the doctor saw, from a distance, that the colonel was loading his pistols.
Of old the Hospadars would not repair them, lest the Turk should think that they were preparing to bring in foreign troops, and so hasten the war which was always really at loading point.
For three hours Phileas Fogg wandered about the docks, with the determination, if necessary, to charter a vessel to carry him to Yokohama; but he could only find vessels which were loading or unloading, and which could not therefore set sail.