loading


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load·ing

 (lō′dĭng)
n.
1. A weight placed on something else; a burden.
2. A substance added to something else; a filler.
3. An addition to an insurance premium.
4. Electricity The addition of inductance to a transmission line to improve its transmission characteristics.

loading

(ˈləʊdɪŋ)
n
1. a load or burden; weight
2. (Electrical Engineering) the addition of an inductance to electrical equipment, such as a transmission line or aerial, to improve its performance. See loading coil
3. (Insurance) an addition to an insurance premium to cover expenses, provide a safer profit margin, etc
4. (Aeronautics) the ratio of the gross weight of an aircraft to its engine power (power loading), wing area (wing loading), or some other parameter, or of the gross weight of a helicopter to its rotor disc area (disc loading)
5. (Psychology) psychol the correlation of a factor, such as a personality trait, with a performance score derived from a psychological test
6. (Elements & Compounds) material, such as china clay or size, added to paper, textiles, or similar materials to produce a smooth surface, increase weight, etc
7. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) Austral and NZ a payment made in addition to a basic wage or salary to reward special skills, compensate for unfavourable conditions, etc

load•ing

(ˈloʊ dɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of one that loads.
2. that with which something is loaded; burden, or charge.
3. the ratio of the gross weight of an airplane to engine power, wing span, or wing area.
4. an addition to the net premium of an insurance policy, to cover expenses and allow a margin for contingencies and profit.
[1425–75]

loading

The process of putting personnel, materiel, supplies and other freight on board ships, aircraft, trains, road vehicles, or other means of conveyance. See also embarkation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loading - weight to be borne or conveyedloading - weight to be borne or conveyed  
burthen - a variant of `burden'
dead load - a constant load on a structure (e.g. a bridge) due to the weight of the supported structure itself
live load, superload - a variable load on a structure (e.g. a bridge) such as moving traffic
millstone - any load that is difficult to carry
overburden, overload - an excessive burden
overload - an electrical load that exceeds the available electrical power
weight - an artifact that is heavy
2.loading - a quantity that can be processed or transported at one time; "the system broke down under excessive loads"
indefinite quantity - an estimated quantity
trainload - quantity that can be carried by a train
3.loading - the ratio of the gross weight of an airplane to some factor determining its lift
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
power loading - the ratio of the weight of an airplane to its engine power
span loading - the ratio of the weight of an airplane to its wingspan
wing loading - the ratio of the weight of an airplane to its wing area
4.loading - goods carried by a large vehicleloading - goods carried by a large vehicle  
merchandise, product, ware - commodities offered for sale; "good business depends on having good merchandise"; "that store offers a variety of products"
5.loading - the labor of putting a load of something on or in a vehicle or ship or container etc.; "the loading took 2 hours"
handling - manual (or mechanical) carrying or moving or delivering or working with something
unloading - the labor of taking a load of something off of or out of a vehicle or ship or container etc.
Translations
arc-boutementchargement

loading

[ˈləʊdɪŋ]
A. N (Insurance) → sobreprima f
B. CPD loading bay, loading dock Nárea m de carga y descarga

loading

[ˈləʊdɪŋ] nchargement mloading bay naire f de chargementloading ramp nrampe f de chargement

loading

:
loading bay
nLadeplatz m
loading bridge
nVerladebrücke f; (Aviat) → Fluggastbrücke f

load·ing

n. carga por administración de una sustancia en una prueba metabólica;
___ testprueba de carga.
References in classic literature ?
They were loading a haycock onto the cart not far from him.
The hurry of the times, the loading and discharging organization of the docks, the use of hoisting machinery which works quickly and will not wait, the cry for prompt despatch, the very size of his ship, stand nowadays between the modern seaman and the thorough knowledge of his craft.
The loading of ships was once a matter of skill, judgment, and knowledge.
Hunter brought the boat round under the stern-port, and Joyce and I set to work loading her with powder tins, muskets, bags of biscuits, kegs of pork, a cask of cognac, and my invaluable medicine chest.
He caught the painter and made it fast, and we fell to loading the boat for our very lives.
Then, when the loading finally began, a sleety rain was coming down once more, and the tree trunks were so slippery that it took twice as long as usual to lift them and get them in place on the sledge.
That this might be accomplished within the day was the explanation of the reverberation occurring so soon after midnight, the aim of the carters being to reach the door of the outgoing households by six o'clock, when the loading of their movables at once began.
After loading there was a long delay before the horses were brought, these having been unharnessed during the ridding; but at length, about two o'clock, the whole was under way, the cooking-pot swinging from the axle of the waggon, Mrs Durbeyfield and family at the top, the matron having in her lap, to prevent injury to its works, the head of the clock, which, at any exceptional lurch of the waggon, struck one, or one-and-a-half, in hurt tones.
AFC FIBC (bulk-bag) unloading equipment features fork-lift or integral chain-hoist loading.
Video presentations showed how vehicles were either flattened or crushed and the common practices to remove or secure loose parts prior to loading the vehicles.
Variations in the design can include radial and lateral loading capabilities, tire/wheel assembly size, lateral and torsional travel and platform size, etc.
The simultaneous loading of three barge sites proved critical in the movement of 1st Infantry Division equipment from Germany as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom.