loath


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loath

also loth  (lōth, lōth)
adj.
Unwilling or reluctant; disinclined: I am loath to go on such short notice.

[Middle English loth, displeasing, loath, from Old English lāth, hateful, loathsome.]

loath

(ləʊθ) or

loth

adj
1. (usually foll by to) reluctant or unwilling
2. nothing loath willing
[Old English lāth (in the sense: hostile); related to Old Norse leithr]
ˈloathness, ˈlothness n

loath

or loth

(loʊθ, loʊð)

adj.
unwilling; reluctant: to be loath to admit a mistake.
[before 900; Middle English loth, lath, Old English lāth hostile, hateful, c. Old Saxon lēth, Old High German leid, Old Norse leithr]
loath′ness, n.
syn: See reluctant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.loath - unwillingness to do something contrary to your custom; "a reluctant smile"; "loath to admit a mistake"
unwilling - not disposed or inclined toward; "an unwilling assistant"; "unwilling to face facts"
2.loath - (usually followed by `to') strongly opposedloath - (usually followed by `to') strongly opposed; "antipathetic to new ideas"; "averse to taking risks"; "loath to go on such short notice"; "clearly indisposed to grant their request"
disinclined - unwilling because of mild dislike or disapproval; "disinclined to say anything to anybody"

loath

loth
adjective unwilling, against, opposed, counter, resisting, reluctant, backward, averse, disinclined, indisposed She is loath to give up her hard-earned liberty.
willing, keen, anxious, eager, enthusiastic, avid, desirous

loath

also loth
adjective
Not inclined or willing to do or undertake:
Translations

loath

[ləʊθ] ADJ to be loath to do sthestar poco dispuesto a hacer algo, ser reacio a hacer algo
to be loath for sb to do sthno querer en absoluto que algn haga algo
nothing loathde buena gana

loath

[ˈləʊθ] adj
to be loath to do sth → répugner à faire qch

loath

, loth
adj to be loath to do somethingetw ungern tun; loath as I am to leaveso ungern ich auch gehe; he was loath for us to goer ließ uns ungern gehen; nothing loath (old)bereitwillig(st)

loath

[ləʊθ] adj to be loath to do sthessere riluttante or restio/a a fare qc
References in classic literature ?
Mother and sisters gathered close, as if loath to give Meg up.
They moved us into town, put down the carpets in our new house, made shelves and cupboards for grandmother's kitchen, and seemed loath to leave us.
When they drew near he motioned them away with an expressive action of the foot, loath to disturb the fixed lines of his countenance, his arms, or his rigid shoulders.
For myself, I conclude the Bumppos could shoot, for I have a natural turn with a rifle, which must have been handed down from generation to generation, as, our holy commandments tell us, all good and evil gifts are bestowed; though I should be loath to answer for other people in such a matter.
Fair knight, said they, that were we loath to do; for as for Sir Kay we chased him hither, and had overcome him had ye not been; therefore, to yield us unto him it were no reason.
He was loath to withdraw his faith from the twins, and was resolved not to do it on the present indecisive evidence; but--well, he would think, and then decide how to act.
Lammeter isn't likely to be loath for his daughter to marry into my family, I should think.
uf, looking towards his followers, who, lingering and loath, faltered forth their belief, that if this were not Cedric who was there in presence, they knew not what was become of him.
But I protest that I am loath to lose your company," replied Robin.
I was not loath to follow their example, for I felt thirsty and hungry.
Neither of us seemed disposed to resume digging, and when he suggested a meal, I was nothing loath.
But Adam, being of a calm and cautious character, was loath to relinquish the advantages which a single man possesses for raising himself in the world.