lobbying


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lob·by

 (lŏb′ē)
n. pl. lob·bies
1. A hall, foyer, or waiting room at or near the entrance to a building, such as a hotel or theater.
2. A public room next to the assembly chamber of a legislative body.
3. A group of persons engaged in trying to influence legislators or other public officials in favor of a specific cause: the banking lobby; the labor lobby.
v. lob·bied, lob·by·ing, lob·bies
v.intr.
To try to influence the thinking of legislators or other public officials for or against a specific cause: lobbying for stronger environmental safeguards; lobbied against the proliferation of nuclear arms.
v.tr.
1. To try to influence public officials on behalf of or against (proposed legislation, for example): lobbied the bill through Congress; lobbied the bill to a negative vote.
2. To try to influence (an official) to take a desired action.

[Medieval Latin lobia, monastic cloister, of Germanic origin.]

lob′by·er, lob′by·ist n.
lob′by·ism n.

lobbying

(ˈlɒbɪɪŋ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics activity that aims to influence legislators, etc in the formulation of policy
Translations
Lobbying

lobbying

[ˈlɒbɪɪŋ] Ncabildeo m

lobbying

[ˈlɒbiɪŋ] nlobbying m

lobbying

nBeeinflussung fvon Abgeordneten (durch Lobbys); the Prime Minister refused to be influenced by lobbyingder Premierminister wollte sich nicht von Lobbys or Interessenverbänden beeinflussen lassen
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of us have been forced to think about lobbying in more detail since the Jack Abramoff scandal broke.
One of the WBC's main focuses will be on influencing legislation affecting women business enterprises through regular lobbying of key policy makers in Washington, DC, Albany, and New York City.
The title is being targeted to lobbyists, consultants, government and agency officials, and related professionals involved in the business of lobbying worldwide.
Amy Showalter, founder of the Showalter Group in Cincinnati, has worked with national organizations throughout the country to help shape successful grassroots lobbying efforts and train individuals to be effective lobbyists.
Pharmaceutical companies spend more money lobbying Congress than other health care organizations, according to a study from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland.
Q: When is it advisable for a section 501(c)(3) organization to make a lobbying election under section 501(h) of the Internal Revenue Code?
Finally, renewed grassroots lobbying and other advocacy efforts are needed.
The lobbying trade may be one of the few industries these days that isn't suffering.
Yet thanks in part to lobbying efforts by Daschle--and support from her husband--American Airlines got a free pass in the recent airline bailout bill, escaping most legal liability for the hijackings and getting $583 million in cash grants--taxpayer money it will never have to repay.
You simply can't lobby an issue anymore without it being part of an overall triad of issue management," notes John Stauber, executive director of the Center for Media and Democracy, a nonprofit public interest group that keeps tabs on the public relations and lobbying industries.
The IRS' announcement specifically raises this question: "Does providing a hyperlink to the website of another organization that engages in lobbying activity constitute lobbying by a charitable organization?
Nevertheless, the Bush team was clearly irked to learn about the secret lobbying project.