loch


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Loch

 (lŏk, lôKH)
See Lake.

loch

 (lŏKH, lŏk)
n. Scots
1. A lake.
2. An arm of the sea similar to a fjord.

[Middle English louch, from Scottish Gaelic loch, from Old Irish.]

loch

(lɒx; lɒk)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a Scot word for lake1
2. (Physical Geography) Also called: sea loch a long narrow bay or arm of the sea in Scotland
[C14: from Gaelic]

loch

(lɒk, lɒx)

n. Scot.
1. a lake.
2. a partially landlocked or protected bay; a narrow arm of the sea.
[1350–1400; Middle English (Scots) louch, locht < Scottish Gaelic loch, Old Irish loch, c. Latin lacus, Old English lagu; compare lake1, lough]

loch

A word used for a lake in Scotland, from Gaelic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loch - a long narrow inlet of the sea in Scotland (especially when it is nearly landlocked)loch - a long narrow inlet of the sea in Scotland (especially when it is nearly landlocked)
inlet, recess - an arm off of a larger body of water (often between rocky headlands)
2.loch - Scottish word for a lake
lake - a body of (usually fresh) water surrounded by land
Translations
järvi

loch

[lɒx] N (Scot) → lago m; (= sea loch) → ría f, brazo m de mar

loch

[ˈlɒx] nlac m, loch m

loch

n (Scot) → See m; (= sea loch)Meeresarm m

loch

[lɒx] n (Scot) → lago
References in classic literature ?
It would do for the borders of Loch Lomond, and tourists would rush there in crowds.
A narrow loch, scarcely half a mile wide, separates Island McGill from the mainland of Ireland; and, once across this loch, one finds himself in an entirely different country.
At his death the wife went back across the loch to her own people, and the blot on the escutcheon of Island McGill was erased.
It was the question of the child's legitimacy that preyed on her mind, and, when all hope of Samuel's return was abandoned, she drowned herself and the child in the loch.
And throughout the whole book we have wonderful pictures of Scottish life as it then was--pictures of robbers' caves, and chieftains' halls, of the chiefs themselves, and their followers, of mountain, loch, and glen, all drawn with such a true and living touch that we cannot forget them.
Among the great hills and blue lakes of Italy Scott longed for the lesser hills and grayer lochs of Scotland.
There ye go," he said, addressing himself to the rivulet, "bubblin' to yer ain annihilation in the loch yonder
William Gilpin, who is so admirable in all that relates to landscapes, and usually so correct, standing at the head of Loch Fyne, in Scotland, which he describes as "a bay of salt water, sixty or seventy fathoms deep, four miles in breadth," and about fifty miles long, surrounded by mountains, observes, "If we could have seen it immediately after the diluvian crash, or whatever convulsion of nature occasioned it, before the waters gushed in, what a horrid chasm must it have appeared!
But if, using the shortest diameter of Loch Fyne, we apply these proportions to Walden, which, as we have seen, appears already in a vertical section only like a shallow plate, it will appear four times as shallow.
Thirty guineas on the sea-side, or sixty if ye set me on the Linnhe Loch.
The Lodge boasts modern, well-equipped accommodation with a range of rooms and suites overlooking the loch, offering stunning views and a dramatic setting in which to relax, unwind, forget the city and embrace the most breathtaking scenery.
But that was before someone said Argyll Holidays had renovated what they call "lodges" at Loch Lomond Holiday Park complete with outdoor hot tubs.