locked


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Related to locked: locked down, Locked in Syndrome, Locked Away

lock 1

 (lŏk)
n.
1. A device operated by a key, combination, or keycard and used, as on a door, for holding, closing, or securing.
2. A section of a waterway, such as a canal, closed off with gates, in which vessels in transit are raised or lowered by raising or lowering the water level of that section.
3. A mechanism in a firearm for exploding the charge.
4. An interlocking or entanglement of elements or parts.
5.
a. Sports A hold in wrestling or self-defense that is secured on a part of an opponent's body.
b. A secure hold; control: The distributor has a lock on most of the market.
c. A sure thing; a certainty: His promotion is a lock.
v. locked, lock·ing, locks
v.tr.
1.
a. To fasten the lock of: close and lock a drawer.
b. To shut or make secure with or as if with locks: locked the house.
2. To confine or exclude by or as if by means of a lock: locked the dog in for the night; locked the criminal up in a cell.
3. To fix in place so that movement or escape is impossible; hold fast: The ship was locked in the ice through the winter. She felt that she had become locked into a binding agreement.
4.
a. To sight and follow (a moving target) automatically: locked the enemy fighter in the gun sights.
b. To aim (a weapon or other device) at a moving target so as to follow it automatically: "The pilot had locked his targeting radar on the slow-moving frigate" (Ed Magnuson).
5. To clasp or link firmly; intertwine or interlock: locked arms and walked away.
6. To bind in close struggle or battle: The two dogs were locked in combat.
7.
a. To equip (a waterway) with locks.
b. To pass (a vessel) through a lock.
8. To invest (funds) in such a way that they cannot easily be converted into cash.
9. To arrange or secure (an interest rate) for a loan.
10. Computers
a. To end the processing of (a magnetic tape or disk) in such a way as to deny access to its contents.
b. To protect (a file) from changes or deletion.
v.intr.
1. To become fastened by or as if by means of a lock: The door locks automatically when shut.
2. To become entangled or jammed; interlock.
3. To become rigid or immobile: The mechanism tends to lock in cold weather.
4. To pass through a lock or locks in a waterway.
Phrasal Verbs:
lock down
1. To place (a facility or the people in it) in a lockdown.
2. To arrange or secure (something) so that it does not change or can't be undone.
lock out
To withhold work from (employees) during a labor dispute.
Idioms:
lock horns
To become embroiled in conflict.
lock lips Slang
To engage in a long kiss.
lock, stock, and barrel
To the greatest or most complete extent; wholly: an estate that was auctioned off lock, stock, and barrel.
under lock and key
Securely locked up.

[Middle English lok, from Old English loc, bolt, bar.]

lock′a·ble adj.

lock 2

 (lŏk)
n.
1.
a. A length or curl of hair; a tress.
b. often locks The hair of the head.
2. A small wisp or tuft, as of wool or cotton.

[Middle English, lok, from Old English loc, locc.]

locked

(lɒkt)
adj
fastened with a lock
Translations

locked

[ˈlɒkt] adj [door, suitcase, drawer] → fermé(e) à clé
References in classic literature ?
Instantly, Sir What's-his-name recovered himself, pitched the tyrant out of the window, and turned to join the lady, victorious, but with a bump on his brow, found the door locked, tore up the curtains, made a rope ladder, got halfway down when the ladder broke, and he went headfirst into the moat, sixty feet below.
With the stone he broke out a corner of the window and then locked the door and sat down at the desk before the open Bible to wait.
Well, it isn't locked up in a safe deposit box, of that I'm sure," laughed the professor.
They found the place locked up, and they had to break the window to get into Antonia's bedroom.
During this time we discovered no uneasiness or desire to escape, which made them less suspicious of us; but in the dead of night, as we lay in a thick cane-brake by a large fire, when sleep had locked up their senses, my situation not disposing me for rest, I touched my companion and gently awoke him.
I have locked the door and thrown the key down into the front path.
Immediately on his death, the shop-door had been locked, bolted, and barred, and, down to the period of our story, had probably never once been opened.
It's in a locked drawer-- it has not been out for years.
Hearing him foolishly fumbling there, the Captain laughs lowly to himself, and mutters something about the doors of convicts' cells being never allowed to be locked within.
Thou saw'st the locked lovers when leaping from their flaming ship; heart to heart they sank beneath the exulting wave; true to each other, when heaven seemed false to them.
James came in to look at us the last thing, and then the door was locked.