(redirected from locomotes)
Also found in: Thesaurus.


intr.v. lo·co·mot·ed, lo·co·mot·ing, lo·co·motes
To move from one place to another.

[Back-formation from locomotion.]


vb (intr)
to move from one place to another


(ˌloʊ kəˈmoʊt)

v.i. -mot•ed, -mot•ing.
to move about, esp. under one's own power.
[1825–35; back formation from locomotion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.locomote - change locationlocomote - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
circulate, go around, spread - become widely known and passed on; "the rumor spread"; "the story went around in the office"
carry - cover a certain distance or advance beyond; "The drive carried to the green"
ease - move gently or carefully; "He eased himself into the chair"
whish - move with a whishing sound; "The car whished past her"
float - move lightly, as if suspended; "The dancer floated across the stage"
swap - move (a piece of a program) into memory, in computer science
seek - go to or towards; "a liquid seeks its own level"
whine - move with a whining sound; "The bullets were whining past us"
fly - be dispersed or disseminated; "Rumors and accusations are flying"
ride - move like a floating object; "The moon rode high in the night sky"
come - cover a certain distance; "She came a long way"
ghost - move like a ghost; "The masked men ghosted across the moonlit yard"
betake oneself - displace oneself; go from one location to another
overfly, pass over - fly over; "The plane passed over Damascus"
travel - undergo transportation as in a vehicle; "We travelled North on Rte. 508"
wend - direct one's course or way; "wend your way through the crowds"
do - travel or traverse (a distance); "This car does 150 miles per hour"; "We did 6 miles on our hike every day"
raft - travel by raft in water; "Raft the Colorado River"
get about, get around - move around; move from place to place; "How does she get around without a car?"
resort, repair - move, travel, or proceed toward some place; "He repaired to his cabin in the woods"
cruise - travel at a moderate speed; "Please keep your seat belt fastened while the plane is reaching cruising altitude"
journey, travel - travel upon or across; "travel the oceans"
come, come up - move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody; "He came singing down the road"; "Come with me to the Casbah"; "come down here!"; "come out of the closet!"; "come into the room"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
round - wind around; move along a circular course; "round the bend"
trundle - move heavily; "the streetcar trundled down the avenue"
push - move strenuously and with effort; "The crowd pushed forward"
travel purposefully - travel volitionally and in a certain direction with a certain goal
swing - change direction with a swinging motion; turn; "swing back"; "swing forward"
rove, stray, roam, vagabond, wander, swan, ramble, range, drift, tramp, cast, roll - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
take the air, walk - take a walk; go for a walk; walk for pleasure; "The lovers held hands while walking"; "We like to walk every Sunday"
meander, thread, wind, wander, weave - to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body"
spirt, spurt, forge - move or act with a sudden increase in speed or energy
crawl, creep - move slowly; in the case of people or animals with the body near the ground; "The crocodile was crawling along the riverbed"
scramble - to move hurriedly; "The friend scrambled after them"
slither, slide - to pass or move unobtrusively or smoothly; "They slid through the wicket in the big gate"
roll, wheel - move along on or as if on wheels or a wheeled vehicle; "The President's convoy rolled past the crowds"
glide - move smoothly and effortlessly
jounce, bounce - move up and down repeatedly
breeze - to proceed quickly and easily
be adrift, drift, float, blow - be in motion due to some air or water current; "The leaves were blowing in the wind"; "the boat drifted on the lake"; "The sailboat was adrift on the open sea"; "the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore"
play - move or seem to move quickly, lightly, or irregularly; "The spotlights played on the politicians"
float, swim - be afloat either on or below a liquid surface and not sink to the bottom
swim - move as if gliding through water; "this snake swims through the soil where it lives"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
References in periodicals archive ?
In the back gallery, a continuous fifteen-minute slide-show loop played such classics as Running Man (big-nosed figure locomotes forward step by clunky step) and The Airplane Trip (the plane crashes, slowly).