locomote

(redirected from locomoting)
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lo·co·mote

 (lō′kə-mōt′)
intr.v. lo·co·mot·ed, lo·co·mot·ing, lo·co·motes
To move from one place to another.

[Back-formation from locomotion.]

locomote

(ˈləʊkəˌməʊt)
vb (intr)
to move from one place to another

lo•co•mote

(ˌloʊ kəˈmoʊt)

v.i. -mot•ed, -mot•ing.
to move about, esp. under one's own power.
[1825–35; back formation from locomotion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.locomote - change locationlocomote - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
circulate, go around, spread - become widely known and passed on; "the rumor spread"; "the story went around in the office"
carry - cover a certain distance or advance beyond; "The drive carried to the green"
ease - move gently or carefully; "He eased himself into the chair"
whish - move with a whishing sound; "The car whished past her"
float - move lightly, as if suspended; "The dancer floated across the stage"
swap - move (a piece of a program) into memory, in computer science
seek - go to or towards; "a liquid seeks its own level"
whine - move with a whining sound; "The bullets were whining past us"
fly - be dispersed or disseminated; "Rumors and accusations are flying"
ride - move like a floating object; "The moon rode high in the night sky"
come - cover a certain distance; "She came a long way"
ghost - move like a ghost; "The masked men ghosted across the moonlit yard"
betake oneself - displace oneself; go from one location to another
overfly, pass over - fly over; "The plane passed over Damascus"
travel - undergo transportation as in a vehicle; "We travelled North on Rte. 508"
wend - direct one's course or way; "wend your way through the crowds"
do - travel or traverse (a distance); "This car does 150 miles per hour"; "We did 6 miles on our hike every day"
raft - travel by raft in water; "Raft the Colorado River"
get about, get around - move around; move from place to place; "How does she get around without a car?"
resort, repair - move, travel, or proceed toward some place; "He repaired to his cabin in the woods"
cruise - travel at a moderate speed; "Please keep your seat belt fastened while the plane is reaching cruising altitude"
journey, travel - travel upon or across; "travel the oceans"
come, come up - move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody; "He came singing down the road"; "Come with me to the Casbah"; "come down here!"; "come out of the closet!"; "come into the room"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
round - wind around; move along a circular course; "round the bend"
trundle - move heavily; "the streetcar trundled down the avenue"
push - move strenuously and with effort; "The crowd pushed forward"
travel purposefully - travel volitionally and in a certain direction with a certain goal
swing - change direction with a swinging motion; turn; "swing back"; "swing forward"
rove, stray, roam, vagabond, wander, swan, ramble, range, drift, tramp, cast, roll - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"
take the air, walk - take a walk; go for a walk; walk for pleasure; "The lovers held hands while walking"; "We like to walk every Sunday"
meander, thread, wind, wander, weave - to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body"
spirt, spurt, forge - move or act with a sudden increase in speed or energy
crawl, creep - move slowly; in the case of people or animals with the body near the ground; "The crocodile was crawling along the riverbed"
scramble - to move hurriedly; "The friend scrambled after them"
slither, slide - to pass or move unobtrusively or smoothly; "They slid through the wicket in the big gate"
roll, wheel - move along on or as if on wheels or a wheeled vehicle; "The President's convoy rolled past the crowds"
glide - move smoothly and effortlessly
jounce, bounce - move up and down repeatedly
breeze - to proceed quickly and easily
be adrift, drift, float, blow - be in motion due to some air or water current; "The leaves were blowing in the wind"; "the boat drifted on the lake"; "The sailboat was adrift on the open sea"; "the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore"
play - move or seem to move quickly, lightly, or irregularly; "The spotlights played on the politicians"
float, swim - be afloat either on or below a liquid surface and not sink to the bottom
swim - move as if gliding through water; "this snake swims through the soil where it lives"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
References in periodicals archive ?
He understood perfectly well that society in fact is "made up of independent, locomoting individuals" (Park 1925: 159).
Size is an important factor for the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), with large male crabs often having an advantage over small crabs in mating, molting, and locomoting.
Eventually I get to locomoting myself with bigger weight shifts and more torso involvement," she says.
During natural evolution, insects have developed highly specialized organs, namely claws and pads, to effectively attach themselves to varieties of substrates when attaching and locomoting (Betz, 2002; Beutel & Gorb, 2001).
Since optimal visual recognition of objects is attained when animals are not locomoting (Gibson, 1979), they usually intersperse movement with pauses, which provide the opportunity for the sensory systems to detect relevant stimuli, adapting this intermittent behavior to changing circumstances (Kramer & McLaughlin, 2001).
The questionnaires identified a group of patients who curtailed their fluid intake, for example, because they had trouble locomoting to the toilet (potentially leading to dehydration).
versicolor was locomoting continuously whereas little if any movement was observed in the high-shore species, T.
For example, how do you automatically synthesize a filter circuit from basic electronic components or a locomoting robot from electromechanical components?
Although such travel was not required in the current experiment, the judgment of what is straight ahead, from an egocentric viewpoint (the task used here), is one that implicitly underlies much of the task of traveling and locomoting.
His films are discourses on the uncanny essence of nature: male seahorses giving birth, crustaceans decorating themselves with living camouflage, mollusks locomoting with a flamenco dance.
Locomoting, such as stepping, walking, running, and climbing;