locomotion


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

lo·co·mo·tion

 (lō′kə-mō′shən)
n.
1. The act of moving from place to place.
2. The ability to move from place to place.

[Latin locō, from a place, ablative of locus, place + motion.]

locomotion

(ˌləʊkəˈməʊʃən)
n
the act, fact, ability, or power of moving
[C17: from Latin locō from a place, ablative of locus place + motion]

lo•co•mo•tion

(ˌloʊ kəˈmoʊ ʃən)

n.
the act or power of moving from place to place.
[1640–50]

lo·co·mo·tion

(lō′kə-mō′shən)
The ability of an animal to move from place to place. In many animals, locomotion is produced by the action of limbs or other appendages, such as wings or flagella. Other organisms, such as snakes, propel themselves by thrusting the body sideways against a hard surface. Fish move through the water by means of wave-like muscle contractions that course through the body from head to tail.

Locomotion

 

(See also VEHICLES.)

piggyback Carried on the back or shoulders like a pack; pertaining to the carrying of one vehicle by another. This term, like its 16th-century counterpart, pick-a-back, is of unknown origin. In contemporary usage, piggyback usually refers to carrying a child on one’s shoulders or carrying a truck trailer on a railroad flatcar.

ride shanks’ mare To walk; to go on foot. This expression employs a wry twist on shanks ‘legs’ to imply, especially to the uninitiated, that Shanks is actually the name of the owner of a horse which is to be used as a means of conveyance. Common variations substitute pony, nag, horse, etc., for mare. The closely allied shank it means ‘to walk.’ Related drolleries include go by the marrow-bone stage and ride Walker’s bus.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.locomotion - the power or ability to movelocomotion - the power or ability to move  
mobility - the quality of moving freely
2.locomotion - self-propelled movementlocomotion - self-propelled movement    
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
brachiation - swinging by the arms from branch to branch
walk, walking - the act of traveling by foot; "walking is a healthy form of exercise"
step - the act of changing location by raising the foot and setting it down; "he walked with unsteady steps"
gait - a horse's manner of moving
running, run - the act of running; traveling on foot at a fast pace; "he broke into a run"; "his daily run keeps him fit"
lope, trot, jog - a slow pace of running
crawling, creeping, crawl, creep - a slow mode of locomotion on hands and knees or dragging the body; "a crawl was all that the injured man could manage"; "the traffic moved at a creep"
circle, lap, circuit - movement once around a course; "he drove an extra lap just for insurance"
dance step, step - a sequence of foot movements that make up a particular dance; "he taught them the waltz step"
stroke - any one of the repeated movements of the limbs and body used for locomotion in swimming or rowing

locomotion

noun movement, travel, travelling, moving, action, progress, motion, progression, headway He specialises in the mechanics of locomotion.
Translations
تَحَرُّك، إنْتِقال
schopnost pohybu
bevægelse
helyváltoztatás
hreyfing
schopnosť pohybu

locomotion

[ˌləʊkəˈməʊʃən] Nlocomoción f

locomotion

[ˌləʊkəˈməʊʃən] nlocomotion f

locomotion

nFortbewegung f; means of locomotionFortbewegungsmittel nt

locomotion

[ˌləʊkəˈməʊʃn] nlocomozione f

locomotive

(ləukəˈmoutiv) noun
a railway engine.
ˌlocoˈmotion (-ˈməuʃən) noun
the process of moving from place to place.

lo·co·mo·tion

n. locomoción.
References in classic literature ?
Thus parted the old man and the rosy girl; and Phoebe took the wings of the morning, and was soon flitting almost as rapidly away as if endowed with the aerial locomotion of the angels to whom Uncle Venner had so graciously compared her.
When a young gentleman like Dunsey is reduced to so exceptional a mode of locomotion as walking, a whip in his hand is a desirable corrective to a too bewildering dreamy sense of unwontedness in his position; and Dunstan, as he went along through the gathering mist, was always rapping his whip somewhere.
I was determined, however, to explore the low structure which was the only evidence of habitation in sight, and so I hit upon the unique plan of reverting to first principles in locomotion, creeping.
The facts relating to this apparition (entered in various log-books) agreed in most respects as to the shape of the object or creature in question, the untiring rapidity of its movements, its surprising power of locomotion, and the peculiar life with which it seemed endowed.
Could he have followed without deviation the fiftieth parallel, which is that of London, the whole distance would only have been about twelve thousand miles; whereas he would be forced, by the irregular methods of locomotion, to traverse twenty-six thousand, of which he had, on the 23rd of November, accomplished seventeen thousand five hundred.
After an hour employed in this unpleasant kind of locomotion, we started to our feet again and pursued our way boldly along the crest of the ridge.
Thanks to this mode of locomotion, he traversed the space separating Chartres from Chateaubriand.
Volumnia, not being supposed to know (and indeed not knowing) what is the matter, has found it a ticklish task to offer appropriate observations and consequently has supplied their place with distracting smoothings of the bed-linen, elaborate locomotion on tiptoe, vigilant peeping at her kinsman's eyes, and one exasperating whisper to herself of, "He is asleep.
Their speed and method of locomotion were both remarkable, springing as they did in great leaps of twenty or thirty feet, much after the manner of a kangaroo.
This is the gentlest, pleasantest locomotion we have ever known.
The mode of locomotion is, of course, purely imaginary, and the incidents and adventures fictitious.
In a little while no one thought anything of crossing an abyss on a wire, and the mono- rail was superseding the tram-lines, railways: and indeed every form of track for mechanical locomotion.