locomotive


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Related to locomotive: electric locomotive, steam locomotive

lo·co·mo·tive

 (lō′kə-mō′tĭv)
n.
1. A self-propelled vehicle, usually electric, diesel, or steam-powered, for pulling or pushing freight or passenger cars on railroad tracks.
2. A driving or pulling force; an impetus: "The US could no longer serve as the locomotive for the world economy" (George Soros).
adj.
1.
a. Of, relating to, or involved in locomotion.
b. Serving to put into motion or propel forward: "It may be that the founding fathers overestimated the locomotive force of the collective and mutual self-interest" (Ian Davidson).
2. Able to move independently from place to place.
3. Of or relating to a self-propelled locomotive.
4. Of or relating to travel.

[Latin locō, from a place, ablative of locus, place + Medieval Latin mōtīvus, causing motion; see motive.]

locomotive

(ˌləʊkəˈməʊtɪv)
n
(Railways)
a. Also called: locomotive engine a self-propelled engine driven by steam, electricity, or diesel power and used for drawing trains along railway tracks
b. (as modifier): a locomotive shed; a locomotive works.
adj
1. of or relating to locomotion
2. moving or able to move, as by self-propulsion
ˌlocoˈmotively adv
ˌlocoˈmotiveness n

lo•co•mo•tive

(ˌloʊ kəˈmoʊ tɪv)

n.
1. a self-propelled, vehicular engine for pulling or, sometimes, pushing a train or individual railroad cars.
2. an organized group cheer, as at an athletic contest, that progressively increases in speed.
3. Archaic. any self-propelled vehicle.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to locomotives.
5. of, pertaining to, or aiding in locomotion.
6. moving or traveling by means of its own mechanism or powers.
7. serving to produce such movement: locomotive organs.
[1605–15; < Latin locō, abl. of locus place + motive (adj.); compare Medieval Latin in locō movērī to change position]
lo`co•mo′tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.locomotive - a wheeled vehicle consisting of a self-propelled engine that is used to draw trains along railway trackslocomotive - a wheeled vehicle consisting of a self-propelled engine that is used to draw trains along railway tracks
choo-choo - a child's word for locomotive
diesel locomotive - a locomotive driven by a diesel engine
dinkey, dinky - a small locomotive
electric locomotive - a locomotive that is powered by an electric motor
cowcatcher, fender, buffer, pilot - an inclined metal frame at the front of a locomotive to clear the track
footplate - the platform in the cab of a locomotive on which the engineer stands to operate the controls
iron horse - (c. 1840) an early term for a locomotive
pilot engine - a locomotive that precedes a train to check the track
self-propelled vehicle - a wheeled vehicle that carries in itself a means of propulsion
shunter - a small locomotive used to move cars around but not to make trips
steam locomotive - a locomotive powered by a steam engine
donkey engine, switch engine - a locomotive for switching rolling stock in a railroad yard
tank engine, tank locomotive - a locomotive that carries its own fuel and water; no tender is needed
traction engine - steam-powered locomotive for drawing heavy loads along surfaces other than tracks
railroad train, train - public transport provided by a line of railway cars coupled together and drawn by a locomotive; "express trains don't stop at Princeton Junction"
Adj.1.locomotive - of or relating to locomotion
Translations
قاطِرَه
lokomotiva
lokomotiv
veturi
eimreiî
lokomotyvas
lokomotīve
lokomotiva
loklokomotiv

locomotive

[ˌləʊkəˈməʊtɪv]
A. ADJlocomotor
B. N (Rail) → locomotora f, máquina f

locomotive

[ˌləʊkəˈməʊtɪv] nlocomotive f

locomotive

adjFortbewegungs-; locomotive powerFortbewegungsfähigkeit f
nLokomotive f

locomotive

[ˌləʊkəˈməʊtɪv] n (Rail) → locomotiva

locomotive

(ləukəˈmoutiv) noun
a railway engine.
ˌlocoˈmotion (-ˈməuʃən) noun
the process of moving from place to place.
References in classic literature ?
The locomotive-boiler stood on end, and it and the whole locomotive-boiler stood on end, and it and the whole locomotive were tiled sharply backward.
I was breaking him in to engineer for himself, and I was letting him run the locomotive while I sat up in his seat meditating about Sarah here.
Whenever I see the movement of a locomotive I hear the whistle and see the valves opening and wheels turning; but I have no right to conclude that the whistling and the turning of wheels are the cause of the movement of the engine.
Down the great iron way the huge locomotive rushed onward, leaping and bounding across the maze of metals, tearing past the dazzling signal lights, through crowded stations where its passing was like the roar of some earth-shaking monster.
The hoarse shriek of a locomotive whistling a crossing told him where he was.
There is a great deal of jolting, a great deal of noise, a great deal of wall, not much window, a locomotive engine, a shriek, and a bell.
A door opened, and I found myself in the compartment where Captain Nemo--certainly an engineer of a very high order--had arranged his locomotive machinery.
Just then the locomotive gave a sharp screech, and the train passed out into the darkness of the night.
As Grandfather's chair had no locomotive properties, and did not even run on castors, it cannot be supposed to have marched in person to the old French War.
The idea of a locomotive tearing through such a place as this, and waking the phantoms of its old days of romance out of their dreams of dead and gone centuries, is curious enough.
No little Gradgrind had ever known wonder on the subject, each little Gradgrind having at five years old dissected the Great Bear like a Professor Owen, and driven Charles's Wain like a locomotive engine-driver.
They said that old Windpeter stood up on the seat of his wagon, raving and swearing at the onrushing locomotive, and that he fairly screamed with delight when the team, maddened by his inces- sant slashing at them, rushed straight ahead to cer- tain death.