causality

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cau·sal·i·ty

 (kô-zăl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. cau·sal·i·ties
1. The principle of or relationship between cause and effect.
2. A causal agency, force, or quality.

causality

(kɔːˈzælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1.
a. the relationship of cause and effect
b. the principle that nothing can happen without being caused
2. causal agency or quality

cau•sal•i•ty

(kɔˈzæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the relation of cause and effect.
2. causal quality or agency.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.causality - the relation between causes and effects
relation - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of two entities or parts together
Translations

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪtɪ] Ncausalidad f

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪti] ncausalité f

causality

nKausalität f

causality

[kɔːˈzælɪtɪ] ncausalità
References in periodicals archive ?
The stability and locus of causality dimensions from the CDS are similar to the stability and internality dimensions of the ASQ.
For example, the anchor descriptions for a locus of causality item are "that reflects an aspect of your self" and "reflects an aspect of the situation".
Weiner (1974), in his development of the achievement motivation model of attributions, classified causal attributions across two dimensions; the locus of causality, and the stability of the cause.
The causes were classified according to the locus of causality as internal or external.
Weiner (1985) later represented these elements by two dimensions: locus of causality and stability of the cause.
Four 3-item subscales provide measures of locus of causality, external control, stability, and personal control.
He specifies that the latter "is concerned with the locus of causality in socio-cultural systems, and not with the ontological question of whether the essence of being is idea (spirit) or matter" (p.
Using Heider's (1958) work as a point of departure, Weiner (1979, 1985) argued that attributions may be classified along four causal dimensions: locus of causality (internal/external), stability (stable/unstable), personal control (personally controllable/uncontrollable) and external control (externally controllable/uncontrollable).
uncontrollable) factors, and this controllability was significantly greater in the "best" performance attributions, (b) locus of causality scores were more internal (vs.
A 2x2 repeated measures factorial design varied the target of attribution (self/others) and the locus of causality of attribution (internal/external).
Weiner developed an attribution categorization system consisting of a 3x2 matrix incorporating the three causal dimensions of locus of causality, controllability, and stability.