locution


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lo·cu·tion

 (lō-kyo͞o′shən)
n.
1. A particular word, phrase, or expression, especially one that is used by a particular person or group.
2. Style of speaking; phraseology: "My elderly patients teach me the locution of circumspection and concern" (Bernard Lown).

[Middle English locucion, from Old French locution, from Latin locūtiō, locūtiōn-, from locūtus, past participle of loquī, to speak; see tolkw- in Indo-European roots.]

locution

(ləʊˈkjuːʃən)
n
1. a word, phrase, or expression
2. manner or style of speech or expression
[C15: from Latin locūtiō an utterance, from loquī to speak]
loˈcutionary adj

lo•cu•tion

(loʊˈkyu ʃən)

n.
1. a particular form of expression; a word, phrase, or expression, esp. as used by a particular person, group, etc.
2. a style of speech or verbal expression; phraseology.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin locūtiō speech, style of speech =locū-, variant s. of loquī to speak]

locution

An individual word, phrase, or expression, or a particular person’s way of speaking.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.locution - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situationslocution - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
Beatitude - one of the eight sayings of Jesus at the beginning of the Sermon on the Mount; in Latin each saying begins with `beatus' (blessed); "her favorite Beatitude is `Blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the earth'"
logion - a saying of Jesus that is regarded as authentic although it is not recorded in the Gospels
calque, calque formation, loan translation - an expression introduced into one language by translating it from another language; "`superman' is a calque for the German `Ubermensch'"
advice and consent - a legal expression in the United States Constitution that allows the Senate to constrain the President's powers of appointment and treaty-making
ambiguity - an expression whose meaning cannot be determined from its context
euphemism - an inoffensive or indirect expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive or too harsh
dysphemism - an offensive or disparaging expression that is substituted for an inoffensive one; "his favorite dysphemism was to ask for axle grease when he wanted butter"
shucks - an expression of disappointment or irritation
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
tongue twister - an expression that is difficult to articulate clearly; "`rubber baby buggy bumper' is a tongue twister"
anatomical, anatomical reference - an expression that relates to anatomy
southernism - a locution or pronunciation peculiar to the southern United States
catchword, motto, shibboleth, slogan - a favorite saying of a sect or political group
axiom, maxim - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits
epigram, quip - a witty saying
adage, byword, proverb, saw - a condensed but memorable saying embodying some important fact of experience that is taken as true by many people
idiomatic expression, phrasal idiom, set phrase, phrase, idiom - an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up
agrapha - sayings of Jesus not recorded in the canonical Gospels
sumpsimus - a correct expression that takes the place of a popular but incorrect expression; "he preferred his erroneous but pleasing mumpsimus to the correct sumpsimus"

locution

noun
1. manner of speech, style, phrasing, accent, articulation, inflection, intonation, diction The cadence and locution of his voice resonates horribly.
2. expression, wording, term, phrase, idiom, collocation, turn of speech 'Sister boy' - that's an odd locution if ever there was one.

locution

noun
1. A sound or combination of sounds that symbolizes and communicates a meaning:
2. A word or group of words forming a unit and conveying meaning:
Translations
LokutionRedewendung

locution

[ləˈkjuːʃən] Nlocución f

locution

nAusdrucksweise f; (= expression)Ausdruck m; a set locutioneine feste or feststehende Redewendung

locution

[ləʊˈkjuːʃən] n (frm) → locuzione f
References in periodicals archive ?
This sort of locution inevitably poses the question: Is there any other possibility?
If we hear one more locution implying that the Lebanese economy's doom is inevitable, or another hackneyed phrase about a banking sector that is trying to resist bad economic tides to the best of its ability while continuing to develop.
of explosive justice on ISIS scum in Afghanistangave me an idea about how to turn Trump's favorite locution from a maddening mantra into an action plan.
S'agissant de l'article 4, la presidente de l'UNFT a propose de retirer la mention "dans la mesure du possible", estimant que cette locution vide la loi de ses objectifs et laisse entendre qu'il existe un laxisme face a la lutte contre la violence faite aux femmes.
McKitrick (2003) proposes that an object has a disposition if and only if there are a manifestation, the circumstances of the manifestation, a counterfactual true of the object, and an overtly dispositional locution referring to the disposition.
Actualites Eecrit par Abdoulaye Jamil Diallo N on bis in idem (Pas deux fois pour la meme chose), voila une locution latine qui pourrait faire le bonheur de Nicolas Sarkozy, qui vient a nouveau d'etre mis en examen dans l'affaire Bygmalion.
1]) Propriete syntaxique: Il est impossible d'introduire aucun adjectif dans la suite rue X, quelle que soit la place de l'adjectif, alors que cette contrainte n'a aucun effet sur la locution dans la rue X.
62) Religious gatherings held by the MWOA featured strict dress codes, according to a locution received by Kamm from the Virgin Mary on September 4, 1984: "no woman is to be allowed on the Sacred Grounds without headgear.
It is clear that this locution serves to absolve the culprit, at least in his own mind, from responsibility for the act.
These are some of the ''folks'' -- to adopt the locution Barack Obama frequently uses to express his all-encompassing diffidence -- Obama was referring to when talking to The New York Times' Thomas Friedman.
Medieval developments in the church regularly appear as having strayed from or obscured biblical and patristic norms, with a locution like "Sadly, in the Middle Ages" (p.
Secretary of State John Kerry adopted that locution in his latest peace process framework.