logarithm

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log·a·rithm

 (lô′gə-rĭth′əm, lŏg′ə-)
n. Mathematics
The power to which a base, such as 10, must be raised to produce a given number. If nx = a, the logarithm of a, with n as the base, is x; symbolically, logn a = x. For example, 103 = 1,000; therefore, log10 1,000 = 3. The kinds most often used are the common logarithm (base 10), the natural logarithm (base e), and the binary logarithm (base 2).

[New Latin logarithmus : Greek logos, reason, proportion; see leg- in Indo-European roots + Greek arithmos, number; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

log′a·rith′mic (-rĭth′mĭk), log′a·rith′mi·cal (-mĭ-kəl) adj.
log′a·rith′mi·cal·ly adv.

logarithm

(ˈlɒɡəˌrɪðəm)
n
(Mathematics) the exponent indicating the power to which a fixed number, the base, must be raised to obtain a given number or variable. It is used esp to simplify multiplication and division: if ax = M, then the logarithm of M to the base a (written logaM) is x. Often shortened to: log See also common logarithm, natural logarithm
[C17: from New Latin logarithmus, coined 1614 by John Napier, from Greek logos ratio, reckoning + arithmos number]

log•a•rithm

(ˈlɔ gəˌrɪð əm, -ˌrɪθ-, ˈlɒg ə-)

n.
the exponent of the power to which a base number must be raised to equal a given number; log: 2 is the logarithm of 100 to the base 10 (2 = log10 100).
[1605–15; < New Latin logarithmus < Greek log- log- + arithmós number; see arithmetic]

log·a·rithm

(lô′gə-rĭth′əm)
The power to which a base must be raised to produce a given number. For example, if the base is 10, then 3 is the logarithm of 1,000 (written log 1,000 = 3) because 103 = 1,000.

logarithm

- From Greek logos, "reckoning, ratio," and arithmos, "number."
See also related terms for reckoning.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.logarithm - the exponent required to produce a given numberlogarithm - the exponent required to produce a given number
exponent, index, power - a mathematical notation indicating the number of times a quantity is multiplied by itself
common logarithm - a logarithm to the base 10
Napierian logarithm, natural logarithm - a logarithm to the base e
Translations
لوغاريثْم
logaritmus
logaritme
logaritmi
logaritam
logaritmus
lógaritmi
logaritmas
logaritms
logaritmus
logaritm
ลอการิทึม

logarithm

[ˈlɒgərɪθəm] Nlogaritmo m

logarithm

[ˈlɒgərɪðəm] nlogarithme mlog book n
(formerly) (= registration document) [car] → carte grise
[traveller, explorer] → carnet m de route; [lorry driver] → carnet m de route
[movement of goods] → registre mlog cabin ncabane f en rondinslog fire nfeu m de bois

logarithm

nLogarithmus m

logarithm

[ˈlɒgəˌrɪðm] nlogaritmo
common logarithm → logaritmo decimale or volgare

logarithm

(ˈlogəriðəm) noun
(abbreviated to log (log) ) the number of times eg 10 must be multiplied by itself to produce a particular number. 10  10  10 or 103 = 1,000, so 3 is here the logarithm of 1,000.
References in classic literature ?
All human actions will then, of course, be tabulated according to these laws, mathematically, like tables of logarithms up to 108,000, and entered in an index; or, better still, there would be published certain edifying works of the nature of encyclopaedic lexicons, in which everything will be so clearly calculated and explained that there will be no more incidents or adventures in the world.
I, for instance, would not be in the least surprised if all of a sudden, a propos of nothing, in the midst of general prosperity a gentleman with an ignoble, or rather with a reactionary and ironical, countenance were to arise and, putting his arms akimbo, say to us all: "I say, gentleman, hadn't we better kick over the whole show and scatter rationalism to the winds, simply to send these logarithms to the devil, and to enable us to live once more at our own sweet foolish will
But it is best not to be intimate with gentlemen of this profession and to take the calculations at second hand, as you do logarithms, for to work them yourself, depend upon it, will cost you something considerable.
Shamy succeeded in dismantling the logarithms of Al-Mokawlon`s defense when he got the ball in the middle of the field and sent a shot.
Andreescu and Elliot chose problems that illustrate the use of exponents and logarithms in algebra, calculus, and beyond, and provide students opportunities to understand the principles and practice the computational mechanics.
He has solved everything from logarithms to trigonometry and factorisations to matrices.
Almost overnight from their invention by Napier and Briggs early in the 17th century, almost 400 hundred years ago, logarithms transformed the ability of people to calculate, and thus extended the effective working lives of mathematicians, astronomers, engineers and scientists.
Next came work by Diffie, Heilman, and Merkle that involves computing discrete logarithms.
Numeracy is one thing,but I doubt if I ever used algebra, geometry and logarithms in later life
John Napier is best known as the discoverer of logarithms (an enormous intellectual achievement that would soon lead to the development of their mechanical equivalent in the slide rule).
Rowntree said the five didn't copy or replicate Google's logarithms but wrote their own code from ground zero.
However non-linear functions can be transformed into linear functions with the use of logarithms.