logic


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log·ic

 (lŏj′ĭk)
n.
1. The study of the principles of reasoning, especially of the structure of propositions as distinguished from their content and of method and validity in deductive reasoning.
2.
a. A system of reasoning: Aristotle's logic.
b. A mode of reasoning: By that logic, we should sell the company tomorrow.
c. The formal, guiding principles of a discipline, school, or science.
3. Valid reasoning: Your paper lacks the logic to prove your thesis.
4. The relationship between elements and between an element and the whole in a set of objects, individuals, principles, or events: There's a certain logic to the motion of rush-hour traffic.
5. Computers
a. The nonarithmetic operations performed by a computer, such as sorting, comparing, and matching, that involve yes-no decisions.
b. Computer circuitry.
c. Graphic representation of computer circuitry.

[Middle English, from Old French logique, from Latin logica, from Greek logikē (tekhnē), (art) of reasoning, logic, feminine of logikos, of reasoning, from logos, reason; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

logic

(ˈlɒdʒɪk)
n
1. (Logic) the branch of philosophy concerned with analysing the patterns of reasoning by which a conclusion is properly drawn from a set of premises, without reference to meaning or context. See also formal logic, deduction4, induction4
2. (Logic) any particular formal system in which are defined axioms and rules of inference. Compare formal system, formal language
3. the system and principles of reasoning used in a specific field of study
4. a particular method of argument or reasoning
5. force or effectiveness in argument or dispute
6. reasoned thought or argument, as distinguished from irrationality
7. the relationship and interdependence of a series of events, facts, etc
8. (Logic) chop logic to use excessively subtle or involved logic or argument
9. (Computer Science) electronics computing
a. the principles underlying the units in a computer system that perform arithmetical and logical operations. See also logic circuit
b. (as modifier): a logic element.
[C14: from Old French logique from Medieval Latin logica (neuter plural, treated in Medieval Latin as feminine singular), from Greek logikos concerning speech or reasoning]

log•ic

(ˈlɒdʒ ɪk)

n.
1. the science that investigates the principles governing correct or reliable inference.
3. a particular method of reasoning or argumentation.
4. the system or principles of reasoning applicable to any branch of knowledge or study.
5. reason or sound judgment, as in utterances or actions.
6. the consistency to be discerned in a work of art, system, etc.
7. any connection between facts that seems reasonable or inevitable.
8.
a. the arrangement of circuitry in a computer.
b. a circuit or circuits designed to perform functions defined in terms of mathematical logic.
[1325–75; Middle English logik < Latin logica, n. use of neuter pl. of Greek logikós of speech or reason. See logos, -ic]
log′ic•less, adj.

log·ic

(lŏj′ĭk)
The study of the principles of reasoning.

Logic


the process of reasoning from effect to cause, based upon observation.
1. the method of a priori reasoning, i.e., deductive reasoning, from cause to effect or from the general to the particular.
2. an a priori principle.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the first figure, in which there are two universal affirmative premises and a universal affirmative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the fourth figure, in which there are two universal affirmative premises and a particular affirmative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the second figure, in which there is one universal affirmative and one particular negative premise and a particular negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the third figure, in which there is one particular negative and one universal affirmative premise and a particular negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the second figure, in which there is one universal affirmative and one universal negative premise and a universal negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the first figure, in which there is one universal negative and one universal affirmative premise and a universal negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the second figure, in which there is one universal negative and one universal affirmative premise and a universal negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the third figure, in which there are two universal affirmative premises and a particular affirmative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the first figure, in which there is one universal affirmative and one particular affirmative premise and a particular affirmative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the third figure, in which there is one universal affirmative and one particular affirmative premise and a particular affirmative conclusion.
1. an expression that has to be defined in terms of a previously defined expression.
2. anything that has to be defined. — definienda, n., pl.
Dimatis.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the fourth figure, in which there is one universal affirmative and one affirmative premise and a particular affirmative conclusion. Also called Dimaris.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the third figure, in which there is one particular affirmative and one universal affirmative premise and a particular affirmative conclusion.
a syllogistic argument that refutes a proposition by proving the direct opposite of its conclusion. — elenchic, elenctic, adj.
a syllogism in which the truth of one of the premises is confirmed by an annexed proposition (prosyllogism), thus resulting in the formation of a compound argument. See also prosyllogism.
equality between two or more propositions, as when two propositions have the same meaning but are expressed differently. See also agreement.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the third figure, in which there is one universal negative and one universal affirmative premise and a particular negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the first figure, in which there is one universal negative and one particular affirmative premise and a particular negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the third figure, in which there is one universal negative and one particular affirmative premise and a particular negative conclusion. Also Ferison.
Feriso.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the fourth figure, in which there is one universal negative and one universal affirmative premise and a particular negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the second figure, in which there is one universal negative and one particular affirmative premise and a particular negative conclusion.
a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the fourth figure, in which there is one universal negative and one particular affirmative premise and a particular negative conclusion.
the metaphysics or metaphysical aspects of logic. — metalogical, adj.
a division of logic devoted to the application of reasoning to science and philosophy. See also classification; order and disorder. — methodological, adj.
a multiple dilemma or one with many equally unacceptable alternatives; a difficult predicament.
a syllogism connected with another in such a way that the conclusion of the first is the premise of the one following.
the form or character of a syllogism.
an elliptical series of syllogism, in which the premises are so arranged that the predicate of the first is the subject of the next, continuing thus until the subject of the first is united with the predicate of the last. — soritical, soritic, adj.
a form of reasoning in which two propositions or premises are stated and a logical conclusion is drawn from them. Each premise has the subject-predicate form, and each shares a common element called the middle term.
the principles or practice of synthesis or synthetic methods or techniques, i.e., the process of deductive reasoning, as from cause to effect, from the simple elements to the complex whole, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inferencelogic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
consistency - (logic) an attribute of a logical system that is so constituted that none of the propositions deducible from the axioms contradict one another
completeness - (logic) an attribute of a logical system that is so constituted that a contradiction arises if any proposition is introduced that cannot be derived from the axioms of the system
corollary - (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
non sequitur - (logic) a conclusion that does not follow from the premises
arity - the number of arguments that a function can take
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
modal logic - the logical study of necessity and possibility
logical quantifier, quantifier - (logic) a word (such as `some' or `all' or `no') that binds the variables in a logical proposition
subject - (logic) the first term of a proposition
predicate - (logic) what is predicated of the subject of a proposition; the second term in a proposition is predicated of the first term by means of the copula; "`Socrates is a man' predicates manhood of Socrates"
proof - a formal series of statements showing that if one thing is true something else necessarily follows from it
paradox - (logic) a statement that contradicts itself; "`I always lie' is a paradox because if it is true it must be false"
postulation, predication - (logic) a declaration of something self-evident; something that can be assumed as the basis for argument
explanandum, explicandum - (logic) a statement of something (a fact or thing or expression) to be explained
explanans - (logic) statements that explain the explicandum; the explanatory premises
proposition - (logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false
particular proposition, particular - (logic) a proposition that asserts something about some (but not all) members of a class
universal proposition, universal - (logic) a proposition that asserts something of all members of a class
negation - (logic) a proposition that is true if and only if another proposition is false
posit, postulate - (logic) a proposition that is accepted as true in order to provide a basis for logical reasoning
axiom - (logic) a proposition that is not susceptible of proof or disproof; its truth is assumed to be self-evident
tautology - (logic) a statement that is necessarily true; "the statement `he is brave or he is not brave' is a tautology"
contradiction in terms, contradiction - (logic) a statement that is necessarily false; "the statement `he is brave and he is not brave' is a contradiction"
logic operation, logical operation - an operation that follows the rules of symbolic logic
logical relation - a relation between propositions
transitivity - (logic and mathematics) a relation between three elements such that if it holds between the first and second and it also holds between the second and third it must necessarily hold between the first and third
reflexiveness, reflexivity - (logic and mathematics) a relation such that it holds between an element and itself
quantify - use as a quantifier
presuppose, suppose - require as a necessary antecedent or precondition; "This step presupposes two prior ones"
analytical, analytic - of a proposition that is necessarily true independent of fact or experience; "`all spinsters are unmarried' is an analytic proposition"
synthetical, synthetic - of a proposition whose truth value is determined by observation or facts; "`all men are arrogant' is a synthetic proposition"
inductive - of reasoning; proceeding from particular facts to a general conclusion; "inductive reasoning"
nonmonotonic - not monotonic
categorematic - of a term or phrase capable of standing as the subject or (especially) the predicate of a proposition
syncategorematic - of a term that cannot stand as the subject or (especially) the predicate of a proposition but must be used in conjunction with other terms; "`or' is a syncategorematic term"
scopal - of or relating to scope; "scopal dependency"
2.logic - reasoned and reasonable judgment; "it made a certain kind of logic"
common sense, good sense, gumption, horse sense, mother wit, sense - sound practical judgment; "Common sense is not so common"; "he hasn't got the sense God gave little green apples"; "fortunately she had the good sense to run away"
3.logic - the principles that guide reasoning within a given field or situation; "economic logic requires it"; "by the logic of war"
principle - a basic truth or law or assumption; "the principles of democracy"
4.logic - the system of operations performed by a computer that underlies the machine's representation of logical operations
system of rules, system - a complex of methods or rules governing behavior; "they have to operate under a system they oppose"; "that language has a complex system for indicating gender"
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
5.logic - a system of reasoning
system of rules, system - a complex of methods or rules governing behavior; "they have to operate under a system they oppose"; "that language has a complex system for indicating gender"
Aristotelian logic - the syllogistic logic of Aristotle as developed by Boethius in the Middle Ages
formal logic, mathematical logic, symbolic logic - any logical system that abstracts the form of statements away from their content in order to establish abstract criteria of consistency and validity
extrapolate - gain knowledge of (an area not known or experienced) by extrapolating
induce - reason or establish by induction
deduce, derive, infer, deduct - reason by deduction; establish by deduction
negate, contradict - prove negative; show to be false
elicit - derive by reason; "elicit a solution"

logic

noun
1. science of reasoning, deduction, dialectics, argumentation, ratiocination, syllogistic reasoning Students learn philosophy and logic.
2. connection, rationale, coherence, relationship, link, chain of thought I don't follow the logic of your argument.
3. reason, reasoning, sense, good reason, good sense, sound judgment The plan was based on sound commercial logic.

logic

noun
1. Exact, valid, and rational reasoning:
2. What is sound or reasonable:
Idiom: rhyme or reason.
Translations
عِلْم المَنْطِق
logika
logik
logiikka
logika
logika
rökfræîi; rökrétt hugsun
logikaloginislogiškailogiškas
loģika
logică
logika
logik

logic

[ˈlɒdʒɪk]
A. Nlógica f
I can't see the logic of itno le veo la lógica
B. CPD logic circuit N (Comput) → circuito m lógico

logic

[ˈlɒdʒɪk] nlogique f
the laws of logic → les lois de la logique

logic

nLogik f; there’s no logic in thatdas ist völlig unlogisch

logic

:
logic analyzer
n (Comput) → Logikanalysator m
logic bomb
n (Comput) → Langzeitvirus m, → Virus-Zeitbombe f

logic

[ˈlɒdʒɪk] nlogica

logic

(ˈlodʒik) noun
(the study and art of) reasoning correctly.
ˈlogical adjective
(thinking or acting) according to the rules of logic. It is logical to assume that you will get a higher salary if you are promoted; She is always logical in her thinking.
ˈlogically adverb

logic

, logical
a. lógico-a, acertado-a.
References in classic literature ?
Victor thought there would be more logic in thus disposing of old people with an established claim for making themselves universally obnoxious.
cried my friend again; the chain of my logic was ever too much for her.
Like a certain class of modern philosophers, Dinah perfectly scorned logic and reason in every shape, and always took refuge in intuitive certainty; and here she was perfectly impregnable.
But her nearest friend might say, and say truly, "Your premises are right, your logic is faultless, but your conclusion is wrong, nevertheless; she is an Old Master--she is beautiful, but only to such as know her; it is a beauty which cannot be formulated, but it is there, just the same.
Common sense, right, and logic were all arrayed on Miranda's side.
The lapse of time during which a given event has not happened, is, in this logic of habit, constantly alleged as a reason why the event should never happen, even when the lapse of time is precisely the added condition which makes the event imminent.
To note the curious hard logic of passion, and the emotional coloured life of the intellect--to observe where they met, and where they separated, at what point they were in unison, and at what point they were at discord--there was a delight in that
And as a multitude of laws often only hampers justice, so that a state is best governed when, with few laws, these are rigidly administered; in like manner, instead of the great number of precepts of which logic is composed, I believed that the four following would prove perfectly sufficient for me, provided I took the firm and unwavering resolution never in a single instance to fail in observing them.
In this view of the subject, by what logic can it be maintained that the local governments ought to command, in perpetuity, an EXCLUSIVE source of revenue for any sum beyond the extent of two hundred thousand pounds?
The poor woman, who expected to draw her uncle into a matrimonial discussion by an argument ad omnipotentem, was stupefied; but persons of obtuse mind have the terrible logic of children, which consists in turning from answer to question,--a logic that is frequently embarrassing.
As a matter of fact it was about the only kind of logic that could be brought to bear upon my problem.
We were right in principle, and ninety-nine times out of a hundred we should have proved, by the logic of events, the accuracy of our judgment.