long-lived


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Related to long-lived: Long-Lived Assets

long-lived

 (lông′līvd′, -lĭvd′, lŏng′-)
adj.
1. Having a long life: a long-lived aunt.
2. Lasting a long time; persistent: a long-lived rumor.
3. Functioning a long time; durable: a long-lived light bulb.

[Middle English long-lifed : long, long; see long1 + life, life; see life + -ed, having; see -ed3.]

long′-lived′ness n.
Word History: Some uncertainty exists as to the correct pronunciation of long-lived. Should one say (lông′līvd′) or (lông′lĭvd′)? The answer depends in part on how one looks at the word. Historically, the first pronunciation is the more accurate. The word was formed in Middle English times as a compound of long and the noun life, plus the suffix -ed. This suffix, though identical in form to the past tense suffix, has a different function: to form adjectives from nouns, as in the words hook-nosed, ruddy-faced, and round-shouldered. (Note that English has no verbs such as "to hook-nose," and "to ruddy-face," that would have formed participial adjectives ending in -ed.) In Middle English, the suffix -ed was always pronounced as a full syllable, so long-lifed (as it was then spelled) had three syllables. The f in the middle, by a rule of earlier English phonology, was voiced between the two vowels to (v); eventually, the spelling became long-lived to reflect the pronunciation. (We see the same alternation in life and lives; in Middle English, lives had two syllables just like -lived.) However, this new spelling introduced an ambiguity; it was no longer clear from the spelling that the word came from the noun life, but rather looked as though it came from the verb live. In this way a second pronunciation, (lông′lĭvd′), was introduced.

long-lived

adj
having long life, existence, or currency
ˌlong-ˈlivedness n

long′-lived′

(-ˈlaɪvd, -ˈlɪvd)

adj.
1. having a long life or duration: a long-lived animal; long-lived fame.
2. lasting or functioning a long time: a long-lived battery.
[1375–1425]
long′-lived′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.long-lived - existing for a long time; "hopes for a durable peace"; "a long-lasting friendship"
long - primarily temporal sense; being or indicating a relatively great or greater than average duration or passage of time or a duration as specified; "a long life"; "a long boring speech"; "a long time"; "a long friendship"; "a long game"; "long ago"; "an hour long"

long-lived

adjective long-lasting, enduring, full of years, old as Methuselah, longevous long-lived radioactive material

long-lived

adjective
Existing or remaining in the same state for an indefinitely long time:
Translations

long-lived

[ˈlɒŋˈlɪvd] ADJ [person, species] → longevo, de larga vida; [plant] → duradero; [rumour] → duradero, persistente
women are more long-lived than menlas mujeres son más longevas que los hombres

long-lived

[ˈlɒŋˈlɪvd] adjlongevo/a
women are longer-lived or more long-lived than men → le donne vivono più a lungo degli uomini
References in classic literature ?
But he came of a long-lived family, he had not a single gray hair, no one would have taken him for forty, and he remembered Varenka's saying that it was only in Russia that men of fifty thought themselves old, and that in France a man of fifty considers himself dans la force de l'age, while a man of forty is un jeune homme.
In this year of grace, 1860, I am close on eighty years of age, and though we have been a long-lived race, the span of life cannot be prolonged beyond reasonable bounds.
The Elliotts are long-lived, and the Bryants are not.
Furthermore, children of long-lived parents had lower risk of cancer.
Yet, most model species used in biology are short-lived and provide a poor comparison to long-lived mammals such as humans.
Experts at the University of Exeter Medical School, led an international collaboration which discovered that people who had a long-lived mother or father were 24 percent less likely to get cancer.
The loans are secured by long-lived energy infrastructure assets with an average loan size of approximately USD35m.
1 : a long-lived woody plant that has a single usually tall main stem with few or no branches on its lower part
The protective pigment, called sporopollenin, and several of its long-lived breakdown products absorb a specific wave-length of ultraviolet radiation, says Lomax.
Statement 154 also requires that a change in method of depreciation, amortization or depletion for long-lived, nonfinancial assets be accounted for as a change in accounting estimate that is effected by a change in accounting principle
Because the eventual payoff from acquiring a long-lived capital good is unrelated to the date of purchase or installation, there are powerful incentives to delay or accelerate investment to take advantage of predictable intertemporal variations in cost.
The company expects to incur charges of US$ 7 million, comprised of approximately US$ 6 million of cash costs, primarily for early retirement and severance packages being offered to approximately 130 employees, as well as non-cash charges of US$ 1 million to impair the remaining book value of the associated long-lived assets.