LTC

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Related to Long-term care: Long-term care insurance, Long-Term Care Facilities

LTC

abbr.
lieutenant colonel
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References in periodicals archive ?
Grachek: The College's mission is, as always, about promoting excellence in long-term care leadership.
ensure the co-ordination of community services provided by multi-service agencies with those services offered by hospitals, long-term care facilities, mental health services, health care professionals and social service agencies, and to promote a continuum of health and social services.
Many people are in denial--they don't believe they will ever need long-term care.
The implications of the GAO report are vital to the VA's long-term care planning.
After seeing firsthand what care cost for his Mom, Gray, 60, and his wife started to seriously think about buying their own long-term care insurance.
Years in the Long-Term Care Community: More than two decades
For those who use formal long-term care supports, the federal/state Medicaid program is the primary public payer, covering 31 percent of long-term care expenditures.
There is no question that long-term care has evolved in recent years into a multilevel continuum, and more than a few managers in the field are ripe either for lateral transfers or for advancement to senior executive positions encompassing more of the levels.
Prudential complements this offering by including many of the powerful features we know consumers look for, such as international coverage, waiver of premiums, a simple calendar day elimination period and home support services," said Andy Mako, senior vice president of Prudential's Long-Term Care insurance business.
Plaintiffs' attorneys portray the companies that own long-term care facilities as "always placing profits above people.
Long-term care is a critical issue for Americans planning for retirement and is generally defined as any kind of care provided for chronic disabilities and illness.
Statistics like these, when read by fearful consumers who have found it necessary to place loved ones in long-term care facilities, coupled with aggressive advertising by some members of the legal profession, underscored by tenacious state reviewers working for government monitoring systems, all combine to create a mind-set for the long-term care profession: You are going to have problems; accept them, cut your losses, "admit" defeat--but keep doing your job caring for America's elderly.

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