longer


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long 1

 (lông, lŏng)
adj. long·er, long·est
1.
a. Extending or traveling a relatively great distance.
b. Having relatively great height; tall.
c. Having the greater length of two or the greatest length of several: the long edge of the door.
2. Of relatively great duration: a long time.
3. Of a specified linear extent or duration: a mile long; an hour long.
4. Made up of many members or items: a long shopping list.
5.
a. Extending beyond an average or standard: a long game.
b. Extending or landing beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal: Her first serve was long.
6. Tediously protracted; lengthy: a long speech.
7. Concerned with distant issues; far-reaching: took a long view of the geopolitical issues.
8. Involving substantial chance; risky: long odds.
9. Having an abundance or excess of: "politicians whose résumés are long on competence" (Margaret Garrard Warner).
10. Having a holding of a commodity or security in expectation of a rise in price: long on soybeans.
11.
a. Linguistics Having a comparatively great duration. Used of a vowel or consonant.
b. Grammar Relating to or being the English speech sounds (ā, ē, ī, ō, o͞o) that are tense vowels or diphthongs.
12. Being of relatively great duration. Used of a syllable in quantitative prosody.
adv. longer, longest
1. During or for an extended period of time: The promotion was long due.
2. At or to a considerable distance; far: She walked long past the end of the trail.
3. Beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal: hit the return long.
4. For or throughout a specified period: They talked all night long.
5. At a point of time distant from that referred to: That event took place long before we were born.
6. Into or in a long position, as of a commodity market.
n.
1. A long time: This won't take long.
2. Linguistics A long syllable, vowel, or consonant.
3. One who acquires holdings in a security or commodity in expectation of a rise in price.
4.
a. A garment size for a tall person.
b. longs Trousers extending to the feet or ankles.
Idioms:
any longer
For more time: can't wait any longer.
before long
Soon.
long ago
1. At a time or during a period well before the present: I read that book long ago.
2. A time well before the present: heroes of long ago.
long in the tooth
Growing old.
no longer
Not now as formerly: He no longer smokes.
not long for
Unlikely to remain for much more time in: not long for this world.
the long and the short of it
The substance or gist: You can look on the front page of the paper for the long and the short of it.

[Middle English, from Old English lang; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

long 2

 (lông, lŏng)
intr.v. longed, long·ing, longs
To have an earnest, heartfelt desire, especially for something beyond reach.

[Middle English longen, from Old English langian; see del- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.longer - a person with a strong desire for somethinglonger - a person with a strong desire for something; "a longer for money"; "a thirster after blood"; "a yearner for knowledge"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adv.1.longer - for more time; "can I stay bit longer?"
Translations
déle
længere
kauemmin
duže
より長く
더 길게
längre
นานกว่า
lâu hơn nữa

longer

[ˈlɒŋgər] adv
no longer, not ... any longer
They're no longer going out together → Ils ne sortent plus ensemble.
I can't stand it any longer → Je ne peux plus le supporter.
He no longer comes → Il ne vient plus.
see also long

longer

أْطوَلُ déle længere länger μακρύτερα mucho tiempo kauemmin plus longtemps duže più a lungo より長く 더 길게 langer lenger dłużej mais tempo дольше längre นานกว่า daha uzun lâu hơn nữa 比较久
References in classic literature ?
There was an occasional tempest, and once Jo marched home, declaring she couldn't bear it longer, but Aunt March always cleared up quickly, and sent for her to come back again with such urgency that she could not refuse, for in her heart she rather liked the peppery old lady.
He still believed that God might at any moment make himself manifest out of the winds or the clouds, but he no longer demanded such recog- nition.
Pontellier's eyes that the damp sleeve of her peignoir no longer served to dry them.
No longer dreaded by her enemies, her servants were fast losing the confidence of self-respect.
Neither was the little old shop any longer empty of merchantable goods.
But it was startling to see this excellent hearted Quakeress coming on board, as she did the last day, with a long oil-ladle in one hand, and a still longer whaling lance in the other.
At length she could control herself no longer, so she sent a trusty servant to her old and faithful friend the Fairy of the Mountain, to beg her to devise some means by which she might get rid of her stepson.
Ripple would have gladly stayed to watch them longer, for she fancied low, sweet voices called her, and lovely faces seemed to look upon her as she passed; but higher up still, nearer to the sun, she saw a far-off light, that glittered like a brilliant crimson star, and seemed to cast a rosy glow along the sky.
MY DEAR BROTHER,--I can no longer refuse myself the pleasure of profiting by your kind invitation when we last parted of spending some weeks with you at Churchhill, and, therefore, if quite convenient to you and Mrs.
The old-fashioned ship-life had returned, now that we were no longer in sight of land.
In that misfortune, in that cell, she could no longer distinguish her waking hours from slumber, dreams from reality, any more than day from night.
Back in his house at Blois, no longer having even Grimaud to receive a poor smile as he passed through the parterre, Athos daily felt the decline of vigor of a nature which for so long a time had seemed impregnable.