longer


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long 1

 (lông, lŏng)
adj. long·er, long·est
1.
a. Extending or traveling a relatively great distance.
b. Having relatively great height; tall.
c. Having the greater length of two or the greatest length of several: the long edge of the door.
2. Of relatively great duration: a long time.
3. Of a specified linear extent or duration: a mile long; an hour long.
4. Made up of many members or items: a long shopping list.
5.
a. Extending beyond an average or standard: a long game.
b. Extending or landing beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal: Her first serve was long.
6. Tediously protracted; lengthy: a long speech.
7. Concerned with distant issues; far-reaching: took a long view of the geopolitical issues.
8. Involving substantial chance; risky: long odds.
9. Having an abundance or excess of: "politicians whose résumés are long on competence" (Margaret Garrard Warner).
10. Having a holding of a commodity or security in expectation of a rise in price: long on soybeans.
11.
a. Linguistics Having a comparatively great duration. Used of a vowel or consonant.
b. Grammar Relating to or being the English speech sounds (ā, ē, ī, ō, o͞o) that are tense vowels or diphthongs.
12. Being of relatively great duration. Used of a syllable in quantitative prosody.
adv. longer, longest
1. During or for an extended period of time: The promotion was long due.
2. At or to a considerable distance; far: She walked long past the end of the trail.
3. Beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal: hit the return long.
4. For or throughout a specified period: They talked all night long.
5. At a point of time distant from that referred to: That event took place long before we were born.
6. Into or in a long position, as of a commodity market.
n.
1. A long time: This won't take long.
2. Linguistics A long syllable, vowel, or consonant.
3. One who acquires holdings in a security or commodity in expectation of a rise in price.
4.
a. A garment size for a tall person.
b. longs Trousers extending to the feet or ankles.
Idioms:
any longer
For more time: can't wait any longer.
before long
Soon.
long ago
1. At a time or during a period well before the present: I read that book long ago.
2. A time well before the present: heroes of long ago.
long in the tooth
Growing old.
no longer
Not now as formerly: He no longer smokes.
not long for
Unlikely to remain for much more time in: not long for this world.
the long and the short of it
The substance or gist: You can look on the front page of the paper for the long and the short of it.

[Middle English, from Old English lang; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

long 2

 (lông, lŏng)
intr.v. longed, long·ing, longs
To have an earnest, heartfelt desire, especially for something beyond reach.

[Middle English longen, from Old English langian; see del- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.longer - a person with a strong desire for somethinglonger - a person with a strong desire for something; "a longer for money"; "a thirster after blood"; "a yearner for knowledge"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adv.1.longer - for more time; "can I stay bit longer?"
Translations
déle
længere
kauemmin
duže
より長く
더 길게
längre
นานกว่า
lâu hơn nữa

longer

[ˈlɒŋgər] adv
no longer, not ... any longer
They're no longer going out together → Ils ne sortent plus ensemble.
I can't stand it any longer → Je ne peux plus le supporter.
He no longer comes → Il ne vient plus.
see also long

longer

أْطوَلُ déle længere länger μακρύτερα mucho tiempo kauemmin plus longtemps duže più a lungo より長く 더 길게 langer lenger dłużej mais tempo дольше längre นานกว่า daha uzun lâu hơn nữa 比较久
References in classic literature ?
But underlying this thought, the first and most simple one, no doubt, there was in our opinion another, newer one, a corollary of the first, less easy to perceive and more easy to contest, a view as philosophical and belonging no longer to the priest alone but to the savant and the artist.
The foot in the boot with a hole in it had already grown numb, and he could no longer feel his big toe.
At length she could control herself no longer, so she sent a trusty servant to her old and faithful friend the Fairy of the Mountain, to beg her to devise some means by which she might get rid of her stepson.
The feudal system of industry, under which industrial production was monopolised by closed guilds, now no longer sufficed for the growing wants of the new markets.
The young girl no longer breathed, no breath issued through the half-closed teeth; the white lips no longer quivered -- the eyes were suffused with a bluish vapor, and the long black lashes rested on a cheek white as wax.
The longer you look for her, the longer she will remain, what she is now -lost.
WHEN the author of these little tales commenced them, it was her intention to form a short series of such stories as, it was hoped, might not be entirely without moral advantage; but unforeseen circumstances have prevented their completion, and, unwilling to delay the publication any longer, she commits them to the world in their present unfinished state, without any flattering anticipations of their reception.
Gentlemen," said he, suddenly, "since the king has charged some other than myself with his secret orders, it must be because I no longer possess his confidence, and I should really be unworthy of it if I had the courage to hold a command subject to so many injurious suspicions.
A new pride taught me mine ego, and that teach I unto men: no longer to thrust one's head into the sand of celestial things, but to carry it freely, a terrestrial head, which giveth meaning to the earth!
If these men were to see my father come back to Ithaca they would pray for longer legs rather than a longer purse, for money would not serve them; but he, alas, has fallen on an ill fate, and even when people do sometimes say that he is coming, we no longer heed them; we shall never see him again.
All this was bad, but she had still more to feel when Friday came round again and brought no Edmund; when Saturday came and still no Edmund; and when, through the slight communication with the other family which Sunday produced, she learned that he had actually written home to defer his return, having promised to remain some days longer with his friend.
I will wait with you one night longer," said the Swallow, who really had a good heart.