longitude


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longitude

lon·gi·tude

 (lŏn′jĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′, lôn′-)
n.
1. Angular distance on the earth's surface, measured east or west from the Prime Meridian at Greenwich, England, to the meridian passing through a position, expressed in degrees (or hours), minutes, and seconds.
2. Celestial longitude.

[Middle English, length, a measured length, from Old French, from Latin longitūdō, longitūdin-, from longus, long; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

longitude

(ˈlɒndʒɪˌtjuːd; ˈlɒŋɡ-)
n
1. (Physical Geography) distance in degrees east or west of the prime meridian at 0° measured by the angle between the plane of the prime meridian and that of the meridian through the point in question, or by the corresponding time difference. See latitude1
2. (Astronomy) astronomy short for celestial longitude
[C14: from Latin longitūdō length, from longus long1]

lon•gi•tude

(ˈlɒn dʒɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. angular distance east or west on the earth's surface, as measured, usu. in degrees, from the meridian of some particular place to the prime meridian at Greenwich, England.
2. the angular distance of a celestial point from the great circle that is perpendicular to the ecliptic at the vernal equinox, measured through 360° eastward parallel to the ecliptic.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin longitūdō length. See longi-, -tude]
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longitude

lon·gi·tude

(lŏn′jĭ-to͞od′)
Distance east or west on the Earth's surface, measured in degrees from a certain meridian, usually the prime meridian at Greenwich, England, which has a longitude of 0°. The distance of a degree of longitude is about 69 statute miles (111 kilometers) or 60 nautical miles at the equator, narrowing to zero at the poles. Longitude and latitude are the coordinates used to identify any point on the Earth's surface. Compare latitude.

longitude

Location east or west of the prime meridian.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.longitude - the angular distance between a point on any meridian and the prime meridian at Greenwich
angular distance - the angular separation between two objects as perceived by an observer; "he recorded angular distances between the stars"
Translations
خَط الطّولخَطُّ الطُّولِ
délkazeměpisná délka
længdegradlængde
pituusaste
zemljopisna dužina
földrajzi hosszúság
lengd
経度
경도
ilgumailgumasišilginis
garums
longitud
เส้นแวง
kinh độ

longitude

[ˈlɒŋgɪtjuːd] Nlongitud f

longitude

[ˈlɒndʒɪtjuːd] nlongitude f
250 degrees longitude → 250 degrés de longitude
at 250 degrees longitude → par 250 degrés de longitude

longitude

nLänge f; lines of longitudeLängengrade pl

longitude

[ˈlɒŋgɪtjuːd] nlongitudine f

longitude

(ˈloŋgitjuːd) noun
the distance, measured in degrees on the map, that a place is east or west of a standard north-south line, usually that which passes through Greenwich. What is the latitude and longitude of that town?
ˌlongiˈtudinal adjective
ˌlongiˈtudinally adverb

longitude

خَطُّ الطُّولِ zeměpisná délka længdegrad Länge γεωγραφικό μήκος longitud pituusaste longitude zemljopisna dužina longitudine 経度 경도 longitude lengdegrad długość geograficzna longitude долгота longitud เส้นแวง boylam kinh độ 经度
References in classic literature ?
He returned in the month of August to Kouka; from there he successively traversed the Mandara, Barghimi, and Klanem countries, and reached his extreme limit in the east, the town of Masena, situated at seventeen degrees twenty minutes west longitude.
Ferguson carefully noted the fact, that he had stopped at four degrees north latitude and seventeen degrees west longitude.
Latitude was latitude, and longitude was longitude," would be the captain's retort.
I have not got the ship's journal to refer to, and I cannot now call to mind the latitude and longitude.
Though the gregarious sperm whales have their regular seasons for particular grounds, yet in general you cannot conclude that the herds which hunted such and such a latitude or longitude this year, say, will turn out to be identically the same with those that were found there the preceding season; though there are peculiar and unquestionable instances where the contrary of this has proved true.
In a few cases, to be sure, the name of a place would be added, as "Offe Caraccas," or a mere entry of latitude and longitude, as "62o 17' 20", 19o 2' 40".
Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think--' (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) `--yes, that's about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?
Half-past six was no longer half-past six to these pilgrims from New England, the South, and the Mississippi Valley, it was "seven bells"; eight, twelve, and four o'clock were "eight bells"; the captain did not take the longitude at nine o'clock, but at "two bells.
At the time that the projectile was as high as the tenth parallel, north latitude, it seemed rigidly to follow the twentieth degree, east longitude.
At noon one day, he and the captain, having taken their observation of the sun, were hard at it below, working out the latitude and longitude on their slates.
And now that at the proper time and place, after so long and wide a preliminary cruise, Ahab, --all other whaling waters swept --seemed to have chased his foe into an ocean-fold, to slay him the more securely there; now, that he found himself hard by the very latitude and longitude where his tormenting wound had been inflicted; now that a vessel had been spoken which on the very day preceding had actually encountered Moby Dick; --and now that all his successive meetings with various ships contrastingly concurred to show the demoniac indifference with which the white whale tore his hunters, whether sinning or sinned against; now it was that there lurked a something in the old man's eyes, which it was hardly sufferable for feeble souls to see.
The 20th of July, the tropic of Capricorn was cut by 105d of longitude, and the 27th of the same month we crossed the Equator on the 110th meridian.