look away


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ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.look away - avert one's gaze; "She looked away when the nurse pricked her arm with the needle"
look - perceive with attention; direct one's gaze towards; "She looked over the expanse of land"; "Look at your child!"; "Look--a deer in the backyard!"
Translations

w>look away

vi
(person)wegsehen
the house looks away from the seadas Haus liegt vom Meer abgewendet
References in classic literature ?
The creator wished to look away from himself,--thereupon he created the world.
Intoxicating joy is it for the sufferer to look away from his suffering and forget himself.
But at the fountain, filling the glass, she was impelled to look at him again--but for no more than an instant, for this time she found his eyes already upon her, waiting to meet hers, while on his face was a frankness of interest that caused her quickly to look away.
I was obliged to look away from him--or I should have lost my self-control.
It lay in her lap--she was not even able to look away from him long enough to thread her needle.
A paired set of weavings titled always look away (2017) and never look away (2017) reference the song Dixie, which glorifies the American South while ignoring the history of slavery and racial injustice in the region.
The recommendation in the haunting opening song of A Series of Unfortunate Events is that we look away.
I could not look away from a friend who was shot four times in the chest.
Can the Birmingham Mail ask the council and the police to explain why they can pick on individual citizens so strongly, yet look away when "travellers" do much, much worse?
She lauded the conference delegates "for refusing to look away and instead identifying more decisive steps to combat this global menace.
London, Sept 11 ( ANI ): Scientists have warned adults that when communicating with children with autism they should be cautious, as such kids tend to look away during conversations and miss out on the non-verbal aspects.
If you find something odd about a very well-paid television presenter boasting about the stuff she's found in skips, or the high chair left out in the street for someone more needy that she's helped herself to, then look away now.