loose


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loose

 (lo͞os)
adj. loos·er, loos·est
1. Not fastened, restrained, or contained: loose bricks.
2. Not taut, fixed, or rigid: a loose anchor line; a loose chair leg.
3. Free from confinement or imprisonment; unfettered: criminals loose in the neighborhood; dogs that are loose on the streets.
4. Not tight-fitting or tightly fitted: loose shoes.
5. Not bound, bundled, stapled, or gathered together: loose papers.
6. Not compact or dense in arrangement or structure: loose gravel.
7. Lacking a sense of restraint or responsibility; idle: loose talk.
8. Not formal; relaxed: a loose atmosphere at the club.
9. Lacking conventional moral restraint in sexual behavior.
10. Not literal or exact: a loose translation.
11. Characterized by a free movement of fluids in the body: a loose cough; loose bowels.
adv.
In a loose manner.
tr.v. loosed, loos·ing, loos·es
1. To let loose; release: loosed the dogs.
2. To make loose; undo: loosed his belt.
3. To cast loose; detach: hikers loosing their packs at camp.
4. To let fly; discharge: loosed an arrow.
5. To release pressure or obligation from; absolve: loosed her from the responsibility.
6. To make less strict; relax: a leader's strong authority that was loosed by easy times.
Idiom:
on the loose
1. At large; free.
2. Acting in an uninhibited fashion.

[Middle English louse, los, from Old Norse lauss; see leu- in Indo-European roots.]

loose′ly adv.
loose′ness n.
Synonyms: loose, lax, slack1
These adjectives mean not tautly bound, held, or fastened: loose reins; a lax rope; slack sails.
Antonym: tight

loose

(luːs)
adj
1. free or released from confinement or restraint
2. not close, compact, or tight in structure or arrangement
3. not fitted or fitting closely: loose clothing is cooler.
4. not bundled, packaged, fastened, or put in a container: loose nails.
5. inexact; imprecise: a loose translation.
6. (Banking & Finance) (of funds, cash, etc) not allocated or locked away; readily available
7.
a. (esp of women) promiscuous or easy
b. (of attitudes, ways of life, etc) immoral or dissolute
8. lacking a sense of responsibility or propriety: loose talk.
9. (Medicine)
a. (of the bowels) emptying easily, esp excessively; lax
b. (of a cough) accompanied by phlegm, mucus, etc
10. (Dyeing) (of a dye or dyed article) fading as a result of washing; not fast
11. informal chiefly US and Canadian very relaxed; easy
n
12. (Rugby) the loose rugby the part of play when the forwards close round the ball in a ruck or loose scrum. See scrum
13. on the loose
a. free from confinement or restraint
b. informal on a spree
adv
14.
a. in a loose manner; loosely
b. (in combination): loose-fitting.
15. hang loose informal chiefly US to behave in a relaxed, easy fashion
vb
16. (tr) to set free or release, as from confinement, restraint, or obligation
17. (tr) to unfasten or untie
18. to make or become less strict, tight, firmly attached, compact, etc
19. (when: intr, often foll by off) to let fly (a bullet, arrow, or other missile)
[C13 (in the sense: not bound): from Old Norse lauss free; related to Old English lēas free from, -less]
ˈloosely adv
ˈlooseness n

loose

(lus)

adj. loos•er, loos•est,
adv., v. adj.
1. free or released from fastening or attachment: a loose end.
2. not firmly fixed or attached: a loose tooth; a loose board in a floor.
3. free from confinement or restraint; unfettered: loose cats prowling around.
4. not bound together: loose papers; to wear one's hair loose.
5. not put up in a package or other container: loose mushrooms.
6. not fitting closely or tightly: a loose sweater.
7. not firm, taut, or rigid: loose skin; a loose rein.
8. relaxed or limber in nature: to run with a loose, open stride.
9. not close or compact in structure or arrangement: a loose weave.
10. imposing few restraints; allowing freedom for independent action: a loose federation of city-states.
11. not strict, exact, or precise: a loose translation.
12. available for disposal; not appropriated: loose funds.
13. lacking in reticence or power of restraint: a loose tongue.
14. (of the bowels) lax.
15. lacking moral restraint or integrity: loose character.
16. sexually promiscuous or immoral.
17. uncombined, as a chemical element.
adv.
18. in a loose manner; loosely (often used in combination): loose-fitting.
v.t.
19. to free from bonds or restraint.
20. to release, as from constraint, obligation, or penalty.
21. to set free from fastening or attachment: to loose a boat from its moorings.
22. to unfasten, undo, or untie, as a bond or knot.
23. to shoot; discharge; let fly: to loose missiles at the invaders.
24. to make less tight; slacken.
v.i.
25. to let go a hold.
26. to hoist anchor; get under way.
27. to shoot or let fly an arrow, bullet, etc. (often fol. by off).
Idioms:
1. break loose, to free oneself; escape.
2. cast loose, to unfasten; set adrift; free.
3. cut loose,
a. to release or be released from domination.
b. to behave wildly; carouse.
4. hang or stay loose,Informal. to remain relaxed and unperturbed.
5. let loose,
a. to free or become free.
b. to yield; give way.
c. to speak or act with unrestricted freedom.
6. on the loose,
a. free; unconfined.
b. behaving in a free or unrestrained way.
7. turn or set loose, to free from confinement.
[1175–1225; Middle English los, loos < Old Norse lauss loose, free, empty, c. Old English lēas; see -less]
loose′ly, adv.
loose′ness, n.

loose

lose
1. 'loose'

Loose /luːs/ is an adjective. It means 'not firmly fixed', or 'not tight'.

The handle is loose.
Mary wore loose clothes.
2. 'lose'

Lose /luːz/ is a verb. If you lose something, you no longer have it, or you cannot find it.

I don't want to lose my job.
If you lose your credit card, let the company know immediately.

The other forms of lose are loses, losing, lost.

They were willing to risk losing their jobs.
He had lost his passport.

loose


Past participle: loosed
Gerund: loosing

Imperative
loose
loose
Present
I loose
you loose
he/she/it looses
we loose
you loose
they loose
Preterite
I loosed
you loosed
he/she/it loosed
we loosed
you loosed
they loosed
Present Continuous
I am loosing
you are loosing
he/she/it is loosing
we are loosing
you are loosing
they are loosing
Present Perfect
I have loosed
you have loosed
he/she/it has loosed
we have loosed
you have loosed
they have loosed
Past Continuous
I was loosing
you were loosing
he/she/it was loosing
we were loosing
you were loosing
they were loosing
Past Perfect
I had loosed
you had loosed
he/she/it had loosed
we had loosed
you had loosed
they had loosed
Future
I will loose
you will loose
he/she/it will loose
we will loose
you will loose
they will loose
Future Perfect
I will have loosed
you will have loosed
he/she/it will have loosed
we will have loosed
you will have loosed
they will have loosed
Future Continuous
I will be loosing
you will be loosing
he/she/it will be loosing
we will be loosing
you will be loosing
they will be loosing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been loosing
you have been loosing
he/she/it has been loosing
we have been loosing
you have been loosing
they have been loosing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been loosing
you will have been loosing
he/she/it will have been loosing
we will have been loosing
you will have been loosing
they will have been loosing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been loosing
you had been loosing
he/she/it had been loosing
we had been loosing
you had been loosing
they had been loosing
Conditional
I would loose
you would loose
he/she/it would loose
we would loose
you would loose
they would loose
Past Conditional
I would have loosed
you would have loosed
he/she/it would have loosed
we would have loosed
you would have loosed
they would have loosed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.loose - grant freedom toloose - grant freedom to; free from confinement
unspell - release from a spell
unchain - make free
bail - release after a security has been paid
run - set animals loose to graze
bail out - free on bail
parole - release a criminal from detention and place him on parole; "The prisoner was paroled after serving 10 years in prison"
2.loose - turn loose or free from restraint; "let loose mines"; "Loose terrible plagues upon humanity"
let go, let go of, release, relinquish - release, as from one's grip; "Let go of the door handle, please!"; "relinquish your grip on the rope--you won't fall"
3.loose - make loose or looser; "loosen the tension on a rope"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
relax, unbend - make less taut; "relax the tension on the rope"
slacken, remit - make slack as by lessening tension or firmness
slack - release tension on; "slack the rope"
unscrew - loosen something by unscrewing it; "unscrew the outlet plate"
unscrew - loosen by turning; "unscrew the bottle cap"
4.loose - become loose or looser or less tight; "The noose loosened"; "the rope relaxed"
weaken - become weaker; "The prisoner's resistance weakened after seven days"
Adj.1.loose - not compact or dense in structure or arrangement; "loose gravel"
compact - closely and firmly united or packed together; "compact soil"; "compact clusters of flowers"
2.loose - (of a ball in sport) not in the possession or control of any player; "a loose ball"
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
uncontrolled - not being under control; out of control; "the greatest uncontrolled health problem is AIDS"; "uncontrolled growth"
3.loose - not tight; not closely constrained or constricted or constricting; "loose clothing"; "the large shoes were very loose"
lax - lacking in strength or firmness or resilience; "a lax rope"; "a limp handshake"
tight - closely constrained or constricted or constricting; "tight skirts"; "he hated tight starched collars"; "fingers closed in a tight fist"; "a tight feeling in his chest"
4.loose - not officially recognized or controlled; "an informal agreement"; "a loose organization of the local farmers"
unofficial - not having official authority or sanction; "a sort of unofficial mayor"; "an unofficial estimate"; "he participated in an unofficial capacity"
5.loose - not literal; "a loose interpretation of what she had been told"; "a free translation of the poem"
inexact - not exact
6.loose - emptying easily or excessively; "loose bowels"
unconstipated, regular - not constipated
7.loose - not affixedloose - not affixed; "the stamp came loose"
8.loose - not tense or taut; "the old man's skin hung loose and grey"; "slack and wrinkled skin"; "slack sails"; "a slack rope"
lax - lacking in strength or firmness or resilience; "a lax rope"; "a limp handshake"
9.loose - (of textures) full of small openings or gaps; "an open texture"; "a loose weave"
coarse, harsh - of textures that are rough to the touch or substances consisting of relatively large particles; "coarse meal"; "coarse sand"; "a coarse weave"
10.loose - lacking a sense of restraint or responsibility; "idle talk"; "a loose tongue"
irresponsible - showing lack of care for consequences; "behaved like an irresponsible idiot"; "hasty and irresponsible action"
11.loose - not carefully arranged in a package; "a box of loose nails"
unpackaged - not packaged or put into packets; "unpackaged nuts"
12.loose - having escaped, especially from confinementloose - having escaped, especially from confinement; "a convict still at large"; "searching for two escaped prisoners"; "dogs loose on the streets"; "criminals on the loose in the neighborhood"
free - able to act at will; not hampered; not under compulsion or restraint; "free enterprise"; "a free port"; "a free country"; "I have an hour free"; "free will"; "free of racism"; "feel free to stay as long as you wish"; "a free choice"
13.loose - casual and unrestrained in sexual behaviorloose - casual and unrestrained in sexual behavior; "her easy virtue"; "he was told to avoid loose (or light) women"; "wanton behavior"
unchaste - not chaste; "unchaste conduct"
Adv.1.loose - without restraint; "cows in India are running loose"

loose

adjective
3. slack, easy, hanging, relaxed, loosened, not fitting, sloppy, baggy, slackened, loose-fitting, not tight Wear loose clothes as they're more comfortable.
slack tight
5. vague, random, inaccurate, disordered, rambling, diffuse, indefinite, disconnected, imprecise, ill-defined, indistinct, inexact We came to some sort of loose arrangement before he went home.
vague clear, accurate, exact, precise, concise
6. careless, rash, lax, negligent, thoughtless, imprudent, heedless, unmindful part of a campaign aimed at educating employees on the perils of loose lips
at a loose end idle, with nothing to do They're most likely to get into trouble when they're at a loose end.
on the loose free, roaming, at large, on the run, untied, at liberty, unrestrained, unchained, unconfined A man-eating lion is on the loose.

loose

adjective
1. Not tautly bound, held, or fastened:
2. Able to move about at will without bounds or restraint:
3. Marked by an absence of conventional restraint in sexual behavior; sexually unrestrained:
4. Lacking literal exactness:
verb
1. To set at liberty:
Slang: spring.
Idiom: let loose.
2. To free from ties or fasteners:
3. To launch with great force:
Idiom: let fly.
4. To reduce in tension, pressure, or rigidity:
Translations
طَليق، غَيْر مَربوطغَيْر مُحْكَم الرباط ، فَضْفاضفَضْفاضلَيس في العُلْبَهمَفْكُوكٌ
volnýuvolněnývolně loženývolně vypuštěnýsypký
løstsiddendeløsløs vægtfri
löysäväljävapauttaalöysätärento
labavširok
lazaömlesztettszabadon lógó
í lausavikt, ópakkaîurlauslaus, víîur
ゆったりとした緩い
풀린헐거워진
atiręsduoti laisvęištrūktineįrištasnepririštas
brīvsērtsneiesaiņotsnenostiprinātsnepiesiets
nebalenývoľne pustený
ohlapenspuščenzrahljan
lös
ไม่แน่นหลวม
bolgevşekpaketlenmemişsallananayrı ayrı
lỏngrộng

loose

[luːs]
A. ADJ (looser (compar) (loosest (superl)))
1. (= not firmly attached) [thread, wire, screw, brick, page] → suelto; [handle, knob] → desatornillado; [tooth] → flojo, que se mueve
this button is looseeste botón está a punto de caerse
to come or get or work loose [thread, wire, brick] → soltarse; [screw] → aflojarse; [page] → desprenderse; [knob, handle] → aflojarse, desatornillarse
see also screw A1
see also connection 1
2. (= not tied back) [hair] → suelto
to wear one's hair loosellevar el pelo suelto
3. (= not tight) [clothes] → holgado, amplio; [bandage, tie] → flojo
these trousers are too loose round the waistestos pantalones son muy anchos de cintura
4. (= not taut) [skin] → flácido, colgón
5. (= not dense) [mixture, soil, powder] → suelto
to be of a loose consistencytener poca consistencia
6. (= not tied up) [animal] → suelto
he was chased by a loose dogle persiguió un perro que andaba suelto
to let or set sth/sb loosesoltar algo/a algn
when the cub had recovered it was set loose in the wildcuando el cachorro se recuperó lo soltaron or lo dejaron en libertad
the affair has let loose dangerous political forcesel asunto ha desatado fuerzas políticas peligrosas
inexperienced doctors were let loose on seriously ill patientsse dejó que médicos sin experiencia trataran a pacientes gravemente enfermos
see also break C7
see also cut C1
see also hell A1
7. (= flexible) [alliance, coalition, grouping] → libre; [organization] → poco rígido; [arrangement] → flexible
a loose confederation of sovereign republicsuna confederación libre de repúblicas soberanas
8. (= imprecise) [meaning, expression] → poco preciso, vago; [style, interpretation] → libre; [translation] → aproximado
he despised loose thinkingodiaba toda forma de pensar vaga
in loose terms, it could be called a religionhaciendo un uso un tanto libre del término, podría llamarse religión
9. (= not packaged) [carrots, potatoes] → suelto, a granel (Comm) to buy/sell sth loosevender algo suelto or a granel
10. (o.f., pej) (= immoral) [behaviour, attitudes] → disoluto; [morals] → disoluto, libertino
a loose womanuna mujer de vida alegre (pej), una mujer fácil (o.f., pej)
see also living B2
11. (Med) to have loose bowelstener el vientre suelto
12. (= readily available) [funds] → disponible
loose cashdinero m en efectivo
loose changedinero m suelto
B. VT
1. (liter) (= release) [+ animal] → soltar; [+ prisoner] → poner en libertad, soltar
they loosed the dogs on himle soltaron los perros
2. (= fire) (also loose off) [+ arrow, missile] → lanzar; [+ gun, cannon] → disparar
to loose (off) a volley of abuse at sbsoltar una sarta de insultos a algn
3. (= unfasten) to loose a boat from its mooringssoltar las amarras de un barco
C. N to be on the loose [person, gang] → andar suelto
D. ADV stay or hang loose! (US) → ¡tranqui!, ¡relájate!
see also play
E. CPD loose box Nestablo m móvil
loose cannon N (fig) → bomba f de relojería
loose chippings NPL (on roadway) → gravilla fsing suelta
loose connection N (Elec) → mala conexión f
loose cover N (Brit) (for furniture) → funda f lavable, funda f que se puede quitar
loose end N (fig) → cabo m suelto
to tie up loose endsatar los cabos sueltos
to be at a loose end (fig) → no saber qué hacer
loose scrum N (Rugby) → melé f abierta or espontánea
loose talk Npalabrería f
loose tongue N to have a loose tonguetener la lengua suelta, ser ligero de lengua
loose weave Ntejido m abierto
loose off
A. VT + ADV (esp Brit) [+ ammunition, bullet] → disparar
he loosed off two shots at the oncoming cardisparó dos tiros contra el coche que venía
B. VI + ADV to loose off at sb/sthdisparar a or contra algn/algo

loose

[ˈluːs]
adj
(not firmly in place) [knot, screw] → desserré(e); [handle, knob] → mal fixé(e); [tooth] → qui bouge
loose connection (in electrical circuit)mauvais contact
[clothes, trousers] (= loose-fitting) → ample (= too big) → lâche
(= free) [animal] → en liberté, échappé(e)
to set sth loose [+ animal] → lâcher qch
to set sb loose [+ prisoner] → relâcher qn
to let sb loose on sth (= give sb free rein)
Trainees go through a four-hour lesson before they are let loose on the controls → Les stagiaires suivent un cours de quatre heures avant d'être autorisés à utiliser les commandes seuls.
We let him loose on the garden → Nous l'avons laissé libre de faire ce qu'il voulait dans le jardin.
see also break
[coalition, alliance, grouping] → informel(le)
(= sloppy) [thinking] → peu rigoureux/euse, vague
(in terms of morality) [life] → dissolu(e); [morals, discipline] → relâché(e)
a loose woman → une femme facile
(not tied back) [hair] → dénoué(e)
(not strict or exact) [translation] → approximatif/ive; [terminology, wording] → vague

see also cannon
vt
(= set free) [+ animal] → lâcher; [+ prisoner] → relâcher, libérer
(British) [+ arrow] → tirer
n
to be on the loose [prisoner] → être en liberté; [animal] → être en libertéloose change npetite monnaie floose chippings npl (on road)gravillons mplloose end n (in story, plot)détail m inexpliqué
to tie up loose ends → mettre au point les derniers détails, régler les derniers détails
to be at a loose end (British) to be at loose ends (US)ne pas trop savoir quoi faireloose-fitting [ˌluːsˈfɪtɪŋ] adj [clothes] → ampleloose-leaf [ˈluːsliːf] modifà feuilles mobiles
loose-leaf binder → classeur m (à feuilles mobiles)loose-limbed [ˌluːsˈlɪmd] adjagile, souple

loose

adj (+er)
(= not tight, movable) board, buttonlose; dress, collarweit; tooth, bandage, knot, screw, soil, weavelocker; limbsbeweglich, locker; he kept his change loose in his pocketer hatte sein Kleingeld lose in der Tasche; a loose connection (Elec) → ein Wackelkontakt m; to come or work loose (screw, handle etc) → sich lockern; (sole, cover etc) → sich (los)lösen; (button) → abgehen; to hang looselose herunterhängen; her hair hung loosesie trug ihr Haar offen; to have loose bowelsDurchfall haben; just stay or hang loose (inf)bleib cool (inf); to sell something loose (= not pre-packed)etw lose verkaufen
(= free) to break or get loose (person, animal)sich losreißen (from von); (ship)sich (von der Vertäuung) losreißen; (from group of players etc) → sich trennen, sich lösen; (= break out)ausbrechen; (from commitment, parental home etc) → sich frei machen (from von); to run loosefrei herumlaufen; (children)unbeaufsichtigt herumlaufen; to turn or let or set loose (animal)frei herumlaufen lassen; prisonerfreilassen; imaginationfreien Lauf lassen (+dat); to let loose political forces that will be difficult to controlpolitische Kräfte entfesseln or freisetzen, die nur schwer unter Kontrolle zu bringen sind; I let him loose on the gardenich ließ ihn auf den Garten los; to be at a loose end (fig)nichts mit sich anzufangen wissen; to tie up the loose ends (fig)ein paar offene or offenstehende Probleme lösen
(= not exact, vague) translationfrei; account, thinking, planningungenau; connectionlose; in a loose senseim weiteren Sinne; (= approximately)grob gesagt
(= informal) group, alliance, organization, arrangementlose, locker
(= too free, immoral) conductlose; moralslocker; personunmoralisch, lose; a loose lifeein lockerer Lebenswandel; a loose womaneine Frau mit lockerem Lebenswandel; in that bar you get loose womenin der Bar findest du lose Mädchen; do you think that’s being loose?meinst du, das ist unmoralisch?; to have a loose tonguenichts für sich behalten können; loose talkleichtfertiges Gerede
n (inf) to be on the loose (prisoners, dangerous animals) → frei herumlaufen; he was on the loose in Pariser machte Paris unsicher; the troops were on the loose in the citydie Truppen wüteten in der Stadt; oh dear, when these two are on the loosewehe, wenn sie losgelassen!
vt
(= free)befreien
(= untie)losmachen
(= slacken)lockern
(also loose off) bullet, missileabfeuern; arrowschießen; gunfeuern; (fig) tirade, curseloslassen; to loose off a volley or stream of abuse at somebodyeine Schimpfkanonade auf jdn loslassen

loose

:
loosebox
nBox f
loose cannon
n to be a loose (= uncontrollable)unkontrollierbar sein; (= dangerous)gemeingefährlich sein
loose change
nKleingeld nt
loose chippings
pl (on roadway) → Rollsplitt m
loose covers
plÜberzüge pl
loose-fitting
adjweit
loose-leaf
n loose binderRingbuch nt; loose bookLoseblattausgabe f; loose padRingbucheinlage f
loose-limbed
adj (= lithe)gelenkig, beweglich; (= gangling)schlaksig
loose-living
adjverkommen, lose

loose

[luːs]
1. adj (-r (comp) (-st (superl)))
a. (not firm, attached, plaster, button) → che si stacca; (knot, shoelace, screw) → allentato/a; (hair) → sciolto/a; (skin) → floscio/a; (tooth) → che tentenna; (page) → staccato/a; (sheet of paper) → volante; (stone) → sconnesso/a; (animal) → in libertà, scappato/a
to come or work loose → allentarsi
to turn or let loose (animal) → lasciare in libertà
to get loose (animal) → scappare
loose chippings (Aut) → ghiaino
loose connection (Elec) → filo che fa contatto
b. (not tight, clothes) → ampio/a, largo/a
loose weave → a trama or maglia larga
c. (not packed, fruit, cheese) → non confezionato/a, sfuso/a
d. (fig) (translation) → libero/a; (style) → prolisso/a; (discipline) → rilassato/a; (associations, links, thinking) → vago/a, poco rigoroso/a; (life, morals) → dissoluto/a
loose living → vita dissipata
2. n (fam) to be on the loose (criminal, animal) → essere in libertà
3. vt (frm) (free) → liberare; (untie) → sciogliere; (slacken) → allentare (also loose off) (arrow) → scoccare
to loose one's gun (off) at → sparare a or contro
to loose the dogs on or at sb → sguinzagliare i cani dietro a or contro qn

loose

(luːs) adjective
1. not tight; not firmly stretched. a loose coat; This belt is loose.
2. not firmly fixed. This button is loose.
3. not tied; free. The horses are loose in the field.
4. not packed; not in a packet. loose biscuits.
ˈloosely adverb
ˈlooseness noun
ˈloosen verb
1. to make or become loose. She loosened the string; The screw had loosened and fallen out.
2. to relax (eg a hold). He loosened his grip.
ˌloose-ˈleaf adjective
(of a notebook etc) made so that pages can easily be added or removed.
break loose
to escape. The prisoner broke loose.
let loose
to free from control. The circus trainer has let the lions loose.

a loose (not lose) screw.

loose

فَضْفاض, مَفْكُوكٌ volný løs, løstsiddende weit φαρδύς, χαλαρός holgado, suelto löysä, väljä ample, lâche labav, širok ampio, sciolto ゆったりとした, 緩い 풀린, 헐거워진 los, ruim ledig, løs luźny folgado, frouxo, solto расшатанный, свободный lös ไม่แน่น, หลวม bol, gevşek lỏng, rộng 宽松的

loose

a. suelto-a, desatado-a, libre;
___ bowelsdeposiciones blandas o aguadas;
v. desatar, desprender, aflojar.

loose

adj suelto, flojo
References in classic literature ?
Meg drew her aside, under pretense of pinning up a loose braid, and said approvingly, "It was dreadfully provoking, but you kept your temper, and I'm so glad, Jo.
Perhaps the glide of long railway travel was still with me, for more than anything else I felt motion in the landscape; in the fresh, easy-blowing morning wind, and in the earth itself, as if the shaggy grass were a sort of loose hide, and underneath it herds of wild buffalo were galloping, galloping .
She was holding the back of her chair with one hand; her loose sleeve had slipped almost to the shoulder of her uplifted arm.
Ay, lady, the fine cobweb-looking cloth you wear at your throat is coarse, and like a fishnet, to little spots I can show you, where the river fabricates all sorts of images, as if having broke loose from order, it would try its hand at everything.
They were two or three prettily written letters, exhaling a faint odor of refinement and of the pressed flowers that peeped from between the loose leaves.
Higginson's congratulatory eloquence, this appeared to be the one thing which Colonel Pyncheon, provident and sagacious as he was, had allowed to go at loose ends.
Governor Bellingham, in a loose gown and easy cap -- such as elderly gentlemen loved to endue themselves with, in their domestic privacy -- walked foremost, and appeared to be showing off his estate, and expatiating on his projected improvements.
Books were flung aside without being put away on the shelves, inkstands were overturned, benches thrown down, and the whole school was turned loose an hour before the usual time, bursting forth like a legion of young imps, yelping and racketing about the green in joy at their early emancipation.
Planted with their broad ends on the deck, a circle of these slabs laced together, mutually sloped towards each other, and at the apex united in a tufted point, where the loose hairy fibres waved to and fro like a top-knot on some old Pottowotamie Sachem's head.
In that fine, loose, chivalrous attitude of the headsman when drawing near to his prey, the three mates stood up proudly, occasionally backing the after oarsman with an exhilarating cry of,
The first stall was a large square one, shut in behind with a wooden gate; the others were common stalls, good stalls, but not nearly so large; it had a low rack for hay and a low manger for corn; it was called a loose box, because the horse that was put into it was not tied up, but left loose, to do as he liked.
Looky here, didn't de line pull loose en de raf' go a-hummin' down de river, en leave you en de canoe behine in de fog?