loot


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loot

 (lo͞ot)
n.
1. Valuables pillaged in time of war; spoils.
2. Stolen goods or money.
3. Informal Things of value, such as gifts, received.
4. Slang Money.
v. loot·ed, loot·ing, loots
v.tr.
1. To take goods from (a place) by force or without right, especially in time of war or lawlessness; plunder: The rebels looted the city. Rioters looted the downtown stores.
2. To take by force or without right; steal: broke into the tomb and looted the grave goods.
v.intr.
To take goods by force or through lawless behavior.

[Hindi lūṭ, from Sanskrit loptram, lotram, plunder; see reup- in Indo-European roots.]

loot′er n.

loot

(luːt)
n
1. goods stolen during pillaging, as in wartime, during riots, etc
2. goods, money, etc, obtained illegally
3. (Banking & Finance) informal money or wealth
4. the act of looting or plundering
vb
5. to pillage (a city, settlement, etc) during war or riots
6. to steal (money or goods), esp during pillaging
[C19: from Hindi lūt]
ˈlooter n

loot

(lut)
n.
1. spoils or plunder taken by pillaging, as in war.
2. anything taken by dishonesty, force, stealth, etc.: a burglar's loot.
3. a collection of gifts or purchases.
4. Slang. money.
5. the act of looting.
v.t.
6. to carry off or take (something) as loot: to loot a nation's art treasures.
7. to plunder or pillage (a place), as in war; despoil.
8. to rob, as by burglary or corrupt activity in public office: to loot the public treasury.
v.i.
9. to take loot; plunder.
[1780–90; < Hindi lūṭ]
loot′er, n.

loot


Past participle: looted
Gerund: looting

Imperative
loot
loot
Present
I loot
you loot
he/she/it loots
we loot
you loot
they loot
Preterite
I looted
you looted
he/she/it looted
we looted
you looted
they looted
Present Continuous
I am looting
you are looting
he/she/it is looting
we are looting
you are looting
they are looting
Present Perfect
I have looted
you have looted
he/she/it has looted
we have looted
you have looted
they have looted
Past Continuous
I was looting
you were looting
he/she/it was looting
we were looting
you were looting
they were looting
Past Perfect
I had looted
you had looted
he/she/it had looted
we had looted
you had looted
they had looted
Future
I will loot
you will loot
he/she/it will loot
we will loot
you will loot
they will loot
Future Perfect
I will have looted
you will have looted
he/she/it will have looted
we will have looted
you will have looted
they will have looted
Future Continuous
I will be looting
you will be looting
he/she/it will be looting
we will be looting
you will be looting
they will be looting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been looting
you have been looting
he/she/it has been looting
we have been looting
you have been looting
they have been looting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been looting
you will have been looting
he/she/it will have been looting
we will have been looting
you will have been looting
they will have been looting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been looting
you had been looting
he/she/it had been looting
we had been looting
you had been looting
they had been looting
Conditional
I would loot
you would loot
he/she/it would loot
we would loot
you would loot
they would loot
Past Conditional
I would have looted
you would have looted
he/she/it would have looted
we would have looted
you would have looted
they would have looted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loot - goods or money obtained illegallyloot - goods or money obtained illegally  
stolen property - property that has been stolen
cut - a share of the profits; "everyone got a cut of the earnings"
2.loot - informal terms for moneyloot - informal terms for money    
money - the most common medium of exchange; functions as legal tender; "we tried to collect the money he owed us"
Verb1.loot - take illegally; of intellectual property; "This writer plundered from famous authors"
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
2.loot - steal goods; take as spoils; "During the earthquake people looted the stores that were deserted by their owners"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
deplume, displume - strip of honors, possessions, or attributes

loot

verb
1. plunder, rob, raid, sack, rifle, ravage, ransack, pillage, despoil Gangs began breaking windows and looting shops.
noun
1. plunder, goods, prize, haul, spoils, booty, swag (slang) They steal in order to sell their loot for cash.

loot

noun
Goods or property seized unlawfully, especially by a victor in wartime:
booty, pillage, plunder, spoil (used in plural).
Slang: boodle.
Nautical: prize.
verb
To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war:
Archaic: harrow, spoil.
Translations
سَلْب، مَغْنَميَسْلُب، يَنْهَب
lupplenit
bytteplyndre
ryöstösaalis
hadizsákmányzsákmány
rænaránsfengur
plėšti
laupījumslaupītsirot
ganimetyağmalamak

loot

[luːt]
A. Nbotín m, presa f (= money) → pasta f, plata f (LAm)
B. VTsaquear
C. VIentregarse al saqueo

loot

[ˈluːt]
nbutin m
vtpiller

loot

nBeute f; (dated inf: = money) → Zaster m (dated sl)
vtiplündern

loot

[luːt]
1. nbottino
3. vi to go lootingdarsi al saccheggio

loot

(luːt) noun
something which is stolen. The thieves got away with a lot of loot.
verb
to rob or steal from (a place). The soldiers looted the shops of the captured town.
References in classic literature ?
This operation required several hours, during which time a number of the chariots were requisitioned to transport the loot, which consisted in arms, ammunition, silks, furs, jewels, strangely carved stone vessels, and a quantity of solid foods and liquids, including many casks of water, the first I had seen since my advent upon Mars.
All the tempestuous passions of mankind's young days, the love of loot and the love of glory, the love of adventure and the love of danger, with the great love of the unknown and vast dreams of dominion and power, have passed like images reflected from a mirror, leaving no record upon the mysterious face of the sea.
Who hold Zam-Zammah, that 'fire-breathing dragon', hold the Punjab, for the great green-bronze piece is always first of the conqueror's loot.
At his back was a quiver of arrows slung from a leathern shoulder belt, another piece of loot from some vanquished black.
From a heterogeneous collection of loot, Achmet Zek procured a pith helmet and a European saddle, and from his black slaves and followers a party of porters, askaris and tent boys to make up a modest safari for a big game hunter.
The poor slaves they had captured were, of course, compelled to carry all the camp equipage and loot and thus heavily burdened, half starved and without water, they soon commenced to die like flies.
Our natural barriers, while they have doubtless saved us from defeat on countless occasions, have not by any means rendered us immune from attack," he explained, "for so great is the wealth of Gathol's diamond treasury that there yet may be found those who will risk almost certain defeat in an effort to loot our unconquered city; so thus we find occasional practice in the exercise of arms; but there is more to Gathol than the mountain city.
Those of the caravan who could escaped, the balance the highwaymen left dead or dying in the road, as they hurried away with their loot.
First he stripped the body of cartridge belt and such ornaments as he craved, wedging it into a convenient crotch while his nimble fingers ran over it in search of the loot he could not plainly see in the dark.
They were all engaged primarily in robbing the worker, but every little while they formed combinations and robbed one another of the accumulated loot.
A fathom under the sand; that was literary; it was psychological; it smacked of the salt sea, and daring rovers, and the loot of the Spanish Main.
All his weight was on one loot, and he was in a state of unstable equilibrium.