lore


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lore 1

 (lôr)
n.
Accumulated knowledge or beliefs held by a group about a subject, especially when passed from generation to generation by oral tradition. See Synonyms at knowledge.

[Middle English, from Old English lār; see leis- in Indo-European roots.]

lore 2

 (lôr)
n.
The space between the eye and the base of the bill of a bird or between the eye and nostril of a snake.

[Latin lōrum, thong.]

lor′e·al (lôr′ē-əl) adj.

lore

(lɔː)
n
1. collective knowledge or wisdom on a particular subject, esp of a traditional nature
2. knowledge or learning
3. archaic teaching, or something that is taught
[Old English lār; related to leornian to learn]

lore

(lɔː)
n
1. (Zoology) the surface of the head of a bird between the eyes and the base of the bill
2. (Zoology) the corresponding area in a snake or fish
[C19: from New Latin lōrum, from Latin: strap]

lore1

(lɔr, loʊr)

n.
1. the body of knowledge, esp. of a traditional, anecdotal, or popular nature, on a particular subject: nature lore; local lore.
2. learning, knowledge, or erudition.
3. Archaic.
a. the process or act of teaching; instruction.
b. something that is taught; lesson.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English lār, c. Old Frisian lāre, Old Saxon, Old High German lēra; compare learn]

lore2

(lɔr, loʊr)

n.
the space between the eye and the bill of a bird, or a corresponding space in other animals, as snakes.
[1615–25; < New Latin lōrum, Latin: thong, strap]

lore

- Originally meant "the act of teaching" or a "piece of instruction, lesson."
See also related terms for instruction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lore - knowledge gained through tradition or anecdotelore - knowledge gained through tradition or anecdote; "early peoples passed on plant and animal lore through legend"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
old wives' tale - a bit of lore passed on by word of mouth
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture

lore

noun
1. traditions, sayings, experience, saws, teaching, beliefs, wisdom, doctrine, mythos, folk-wisdom, traditional wisdom the Book of the Sea, which was stuffed with sailors' lore.
2. learning, knowledge, know-how (informal), scholarship, letters, erudition prophets and diviners, knowledgeable in the lore of the stars

lore

noun
1. That which is known about a specific subject or situation:
2. A body of traditional beliefs and notions accumulated about a particular subject:
3. That which is known; the sum of what has been perceived, discovered, or inferred:
Translations
معرِفَه متوارَثَه عن موضوع
tradice
overlevering
fróîleikur
išmintistradicinis žinojimas
zināšanas

lore

[lɔːʳ] Nsaber m popular
in local loresegún la tradición local
he knows a lot about plant loresabe mucho de plantas

lore

[ˈlɔːr] ntraditions fpl

lore

nÜberlieferungen pl; in local lorenach hiesiger Überlieferung; plant lorePflanzenkunde f

lore

[lɔːʳ] ntradizioni fpl
plant/weather lore → cognizioni fpl sulle piante/sul tempo

lore

(loː) noun
knowledge handed down on a subject. the lore of the sea.
References in classic literature ?
The daughter was just leaving the house to attend the meeting of a branch Folk Lore Society, and regretted that she could not accompany them.
It consequently becomes imperative to make short work with most of the traditionary lore of which the old Pyncheon House, otherwise known as the House of the Seven Gables, has been the theme.
Here the pale clergyman piled up his library, rich with parchment-bound folios of the Fathers, and the lore of Rabbis, and monkish erudition, of which the Protestant divines, even while they vilified and decried that class of writers, were yet constrained often to avail themselves.
On one of these occasions, "suddenly there hovered around the top of the rock a brightness of unequaled clearness and color, which, in increasingly smaller circles thickened, was the enchanting figure of the beautiful Lore.
While Mary drew, Diana pursued a course of encyclopaedic reading she had (to my awe and amazement) undertaken, and I fagged away at German, he pondered a mystic lore of his own: that of some Eastern tongue, the acquisition of which he thought necessary to his plans.
From dinner to tea she would lie in her breeze-rocked cradle, doing nothing except singing old songs - my nursery lore - to herself, or watching the birds, joint tenants, feed and entice their young ones to fly: or nestling with closed lids, half thinking, half dreaming, happier than words can express.
with all his lore, Wherefore he sang, or whence the mandate sped.
She finish'd, and the suttle Fiend his lore Soon learnd, now milder, and thus answerd smooth.
He was versed in patent lore from Alpha to Omega; and as the trial proceeded, he became convinced that the Bell patent was valid.
So it does," said Don Quixote, "and he is a sage magician, a great enemy of mine, who has a spite against me because he knows by his arts and lore that in process of time I am to engage in single combat with a knight whom he befriends and that I am to conquer, and he will be unable to prevent it; and for this reason he endeavours to do me all the ill turns that he can; but I promise him it will be hard for him to oppose or avoid what is decreed by Heaven.
Thus the old ape imparted to the son of Tarzan the boy's first lesson in jungle lore.
It is out of the lore and experience of the ancients and of all those who have studied the powers of the UnDead.