losing


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Related to losing: Losing weight

los·ing

 (lo͞o′zĭng)
adj.
1. Failing to win, as in a sport or game: a losing team; a losing lottery ticket.
2. Of or relating to one that fails to win: a losing season; a losing battle.
n.
1. The act of one that loses; loss.
2. often losings Something lost, such as money at gambling.

losing

(ˈluːzɪŋ)
adj
unprofitable; failing: the business was a losing concern.

losing

  • idiot strings - Refers to the strings that attach mittens to prevent a child from losing one.
  • in hock - Can be traced to the card game faro, in which the last card in the box was called the hocketty card; when a player bet on a card that ended up in hock, he was at a disadvantage and was himself in hock and at risk of losing his bets.
  • jeopardy - Comes from French ieu parti, "(evenly) divided game" (from Latin jocus partitus, "divided game"), referring originally to chess, in which the chances of winning and losing are balanced.
  • pain - Originally meant punishment for a crime or offense—sometimes by losing one's head.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

losing

noun
The act or an instance of losing something:
Translations

losing

[ˈluːzɪŋ]
A. ADJperdedor
the losing teamel equipo perdedor
to fight a losing battleluchar por una causa perdida
she was fighting a losing battle against her depressionluchaba en vano or sin éxito contra su depresión
to be on the losing sideestar en el lado de los perdedores or vencidos
to be on a losing streakestar pasando por una racha de mala suerte
to be on a losing wicket (fig) → llevar las de perder
B. N losings (= money) → pérdidas fpl

losing

adj the losing teamdie unterlegene Mannschaft; to fight a losing battleeinen aussichtslosen Kampf führen; the losing side/partydie Verliererseite; to be on the losing sideverlieren
n losingsVerluste pl

losing

[ˈluːzɪŋ] adjperdente
to fight a losing battle (fig) → combattere una battaglia perduta
on a losing streak → in un periodo nero
References in classic literature ?
Beth said nothing, but wiped away her tears with the blue army sock and began to knit with all her might, losing no time in doing the duty that lay nearest her, while she resolved in her quiet little soul to be all that Father hoped to find her when the year brought round the happy coming home.
At a distance they could see the curious procession moving toward the wharf--the lovers, shoulder to shoulder, creeping; the lady in black, gaining steadily upon them; old Monsieur Farival, losing ground inch by inch, and a young barefooted Spanish girl, with a red kerchief on her head and a basket on her arm, bringing up the rear.
No longer dreaded by her enemies, her servants were fast losing the confidence of self-respect.
It did not occur to her that the doubts of her own practical nature were almost as dangerous and illogical as his enthusiasm, and that for that reason she was fast losing what little influence she possessed over him.
She awoke without the slightest recollection of her visionary experience; but as one losing herself in a momentary reverie, and returning to the consciousness of actual life, in almost as brief an interval as the down-sinking flame of the hearth should quiver again up the chimney.
In short, unpleasant as was my predicament, at best, I saw much reason to congratulate myself that I was on the losing side rather than the triumphant one.
She looked intensely grave, and I had never had such a sense of losing an advantage acquired (the thrill of which had just been so prodigious) as on my consciousness that she addressed me with a reproach.
And nothing about his losing his leg last voyage, according to the prophecy.
And, in these cases, somewhat as a pilot, when about losing sight of a coast, whose general trending he well knows, and which he desires shortly to return to again, but at some further point; like as this pilot stands by his compass, and takes the precise bearing of the cape at present visible, in order the more certainly to hit aright the remote, unseen headland, eventually to be visited: so does the fisherman, at his compass, with the whale; for after being chased, and diligently marked, through several hours of daylight, then, when night obscures the fish, the creature's future wake through the darkness is almost as established to the sagacious mind of the hunter, as the pilot's coast is to him.
It was not the money I was thinking about, but of losing our Sunday; the horses are tired, and I am tired, too -- that's where it pinches.
Their delight at discovering that they were to get out of this adventure without losing another share of their possessions it would not be possible to describe.
I know how you feel about losing your place in the factory, and you have a hard master; but pray be patient, and perhaps something--"