loud

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loud

 (loud)
adj. loud·er, loud·est
1. Characterized by high volume and intensity. Used of sound: a loud whistle.
2. Producing sound of high volume and intensity: a loud construction work site.
3. Clamorous and insistent: loud denials.
4.
a. Having strikingly bright colors: a loud necktie. See garish.
b. Having a very strong or overpowering odor.
adv. louder, loudest
In a loud manner.

[Middle English, from Old English hlūd; see kleu- in Indo-European roots.]

loud′ly adv.
loud′ness n.

loud

(laʊd)
adj
1. (of sound) relatively great in volume: a loud shout.
2. making or able to make sounds of relatively great volume: a loud voice.
3. clamorous, insistent, and emphatic: loud protests.
4. (of colours, designs, etc) offensive or obtrusive to look at
5. characterized by noisy, vulgar, and offensive behaviour
adv
6. in a loud manner
7. out loud audibly, as distinct from silently
[Old English hlud; related to Old Swedish hlūd, German laut]
ˈloudly adv
ˈloudness n

loud

(laʊd)

adj. -er, -est,
adv. adj.
1. having exceptional volume or intensity: loud talking; loud thunder.
2. making or uttering strongly audible sounds: a quartet of loud trombones.
3. clamorous; noisy: a loud party.
4. emphatic; insistent: loud in one's praises.
5. garish; ostentatious: a loud necktie.
6. obtrusively vulgar; coarse.
7. strong or offensive in smell.
adv.
8. in a loud manner; loudly: Don't talk so loud.
Idioms:
out loud, aloud; audibly.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English hlūd, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon hlūd, Old High German hlūt]
loud′ly, adv.
loud′ness, n.

loud

  • happy-clappy - Refers to any Christian congregation that is extremely enthusiastic, loud, and musical.
  • stentor - Homer introduced Stentor, a very loud herald, in the Iliad—which gives us stentor, "person with a loud voice," and stentorian, which originally meant "loud, booming."
  • rodomontade - Meaning loud bragging, it got its name from Rodomonto, a loud bragging Moorish king of epics.
  • thersitical, clamant - To be thersitical is to be loudmouthed or foulmouthed; clamant is loud and insistent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.loud - characterized by or producing sound of great volume or intensity; "a group of loud children"; "loud thunder"; "her voice was too loud"; "loud trombones"
audible, hearable - heard or perceptible by the ear; "he spoke in an audible whisper"
noisy - full of or characterized by loud and nonmusical sounds; "a noisy cafeteria"; "a small noisy dog"
soft - (of sound) relatively low in volume; "soft voices"; "soft music"
2.loud - tastelessly showyloud - tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"
tasteless - lacking aesthetic or social taste
3.loud - used chiefly as a direction or description in music; "the forte passages in the composition"
Adv.1.loud - with relatively high volumeloud - with relatively high volume; "the band played loudly"; "she spoke loudly and angrily"; "he spoke loud enough for those at the back of the room to hear him"; "cried aloud for help"

loud

adjective
2. garish, bold, glaring, flamboyant, vulgar, brash, tacky (informal), flashy, lurid, tasteless, naff (Brit. slang), gaudy, tawdry, showy, ostentatious, brassy He liked to shock with his gold chains and loud clothes.
garish conservative, dull, sober, sombre
3. loud-mouthed, offensive, crude, coarse, vulgar, brash, crass, raucous, brazen (informal) I like your manner; loud people are horrible.
loud-mouthed reserved, retiring, quiet, shy, unassuming

loud

adjective
1. Marked by extremely high volume and intensity of sound:
2. Tastelessly showy:
Informal: tacky.
Translations
صاخِب، فاقِععالٍ، مُرْتَفِعمَدُو
hlasitýkřiklavýnápadný
højkraftig
laŭta
äänekäs
glasanbučan
hangos
æpandi, áberandihávær
大声の
소리가 큰
garsiakalbisgarsintuvasgarso stiprintuvasrėkiantisskambus
kliedzošsskaļštrokšņainsuzkrītošs
głośnykrzykliwakrzykliwekrzykliwygłośna
hlasný
glasen
högljuddljudlig
ดัง
to

loud

[laʊd] (louder (compar) (loudest (superl)))
A. ADJ
1. (= noisy) [music] → alto, fuerte; [applause, noise, explosion, scream] → fuerte
she has a loud voicetiene una voz muy fuerte
in a loud voiceen voz alta
the music is too loudla música está demasiado fuerte or alta
he's a bit loudes un poco escandaloso
to be loud in one's support for sthdar grandes muestras de apoyo a algo
to be loud in one's condemnation of sthcondenar algo enérgicamente
2. (pej) (= garish) [colour] → chillón, llamativo; [pattern, clothes] → llamativo
a loud check jacketuna llamativa chaqueta de cuadros
B. ADV [speak] → alto; [laugh, shout] → fuerte
you'll have to speak loudertendrás que hablar más fuerte or alto
she likes to listen to her music loudle gusta escuchar la música muy fuerte or alta
"Nevermind" is one of those records you play loud"Nevermind" es uno de esos discos que tienes que poner a todo volumen
loud and clear I am reading or receiving you loud and clear (Telec) → te recibo perfectamente
I hear you loud and clear, but I don't agreete entiendo perfectamente, pero no estoy de acuerdo
out loud [think, wonder, read, laugh] → en voz alta
see also cry out A

loud

[ˈlaʊd]
adj
[music, voice, noise, bang] → fort(e); [applause, cheers] → bruyant(e)
The television is too loud → La télévision est trop forte.
to be loud in condemnation of sth → condamner qch avec force
(= gaudy) → voyant(e), tapageur/euse
adv
[speak, play] → fort
to hear sth loud and clear → entendre qch clairement
out loud → tout haut

loud

adj (+er)
laut; protest, criticism, complaintlautstark; he was loud in his praise of the concerter lobte das Konzert überschwänglich; to be loud in one’s condemnation of/opposition to somethingetw lautstark verurteilen/ablehnen
(= obtrusive) behaviouraufdringlich; (= garish) colourgrell, schreiend; tie, clothesknallbunt
advlaut; loud and clearlaut und deutlich; to say/read something out loudetw laut sagen/lesen; to laugh/think out loudlaut lachen/denken

loud

:
loudmouth
n (inf)Großmaul nt (inf)
loudmouthed
adj (inf)großmäulig (inf)

loud

[laʊd]
1. adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) (gen) → forte; (laugh, applause, thunder) → fragoroso/a, forte; (noisy, behaviour, party, protests) → rumoroso/a (pej) (gaudy, colour, clothes) → chiassoso/a, vistoso/a, sgargiante
the radio's too loud → il volume della radio è troppo alto
2. adv (speak) → forte
out loud → ad alta voce
loud and clear → chiaro e forte, molto chiaramente

loud

(laud) adjective
1. making a great sound; not quiet. a loud voice; loud music.
2. showy; too bright and harsh. loud colours; a loud shirt.
ˈloudly adverb
ˈloudness noun
ˌloud-ˈhailer noun
a simple type of loudspeaker. The police used a loud-hailer to tell the crowd to get back.
ˌloudˈspeaker noun
1. an instrument for increasing the loudness of sounds so that they can be heard further away. The politician addressed the crowds from his car through a loudspeaker.
2. a speaker in a radio, record-player etc.

loud

مَدُو hlasitý høj laut ηχηρός chillón äänekäs bruyant glasan rumoroso 大声の 소리가 큰 luid høylytt głośny alto громкий högljudd ดัง gürültülü to 大声的

loud

a. ruidoso-a, escandaloso-a.
References in classic literature ?
They dashed at the grating and escaped by it, save one that, finding itself hard pressed by the slashes of Don Quixote's sword, flew at his face and held on to his nose tooth and nail, with the pain of which he began to shout his loudest.
But when a serious emergency tried the metal of which she was really made, the people who were loudest in laughing at her stood aghast, and wondered what had become of the familiar companion of their everyday lives.
He saw that in this general movement those who thrust themselves most forward and shouted the loudest were men who had failed and were smarting under a sense of injury--generals without armies, ministers not in the ministry, journalists not on any paper, party leaders without followers.
Though in certain circumstances these gentlemen bellow their loudest like bulls, though this, let us suppose, does them the greatest credit, yet, as I have said already, confronted with the impossible they subside at once.
Rosalie remonstrated, and I thought I should have been torn in pieces between them; but Miss Matilda having the loudest voice, her sister at length gave in, and suffered her to tell her story first: so I was doomed to hear a long account of her splendid mare, its breeding and pedigree, its paces, its action, its spirit, &c.
he shouted his loudest and most belligerent, as he ruffled like a bravo at the gutter-cat beneath him, so that he sent her crouching, with startlement, lower to the floor, her ears wilting rigidly flat and down, her tail lashing, her head turning about the room so that her eyes might penetrate its obscurest corners in quest of the human whose voice had so cried out.
They would smouch provisions from the pantry whenever they got a chance; or a brass thimble, or a cake of wax, or an emery bag, or a paper of needles, or a silver spoon, or a dollar bill, or small articles of clothing, or any other property of light value; and so far were they from considering such reprisals sinful, that they would go to church and shout and pray the loudest and sincerest with their plunder in their pockets.
After the giant had supped he lay down to sleep, snoring like the loudest thunder, while we lay shivering with horror the whole night through, and when day broke he awoke and went out, leaving us in the castle.
While this cry was at the loudest, the people were surprised by the well-known figure of Governor Bradstreet himself, a patriarch of nearly ninety, who appeared on the elevated steps of a door, and, with characteristic mildness, besought them to submit to the constituted authorities.
At this moment Bruno re-entered the room, and passing Uggug (who was blubbering his loudest, in the hope of attracting notice) as if he was quite used to that sort of thing, he ran up to Sylvie and threw his arms round her.
The reason is that Spain sends her heaviest ships of war and her loudest guns to astonish these Muslims, while America and other nations send only a little contemptible tub of a gunboat occasionally.
To them the sudden scraping of one blade of grass across another was as effectual a warning as her loudest cry, and Sabor knew that she could not make that mighty leap without a little noise.