loudness


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Related to loudness: loudness unit, Loudness war

loud

 (loud)
adj. loud·er, loud·est
1. Characterized by high volume and intensity. Used of sound: a loud whistle.
2. Producing sound of high volume and intensity: a loud construction work site.
3. Clamorous and insistent: loud denials.
4.
a. Having strikingly bright colors: a loud necktie. See garish.
b. Having a very strong or overpowering odor.
adv. louder, loudest
In a loud manner.

[Middle English, from Old English hlūd; see kleu- in Indo-European roots.]

loud′ly adv.
loud′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loudness - the magnitude of sound (usually in a specified direction)loudness - the magnitude of sound (usually in a specified direction); "the kids played their music at full volume"
sound property - an attribute of sound
crescendo - (music) a gradual increase in loudness
fortissimo, forte - (music) loud
softness - a sound property that is free from loudness or stridency; "and in softness almost beyond hearing"
2.loudness - tasteless showinessloudness - tasteless showiness      
tastelessness - inelegance indicated by a lack of good taste
Translations
إرتِفاع الصَّوْت
hlučnost
støjniveau
correction physiologique
hangosság
hávaîi
yüksek seslilik

loudness

[ˈlaʊdnɪs] N
1. [of bang, explosion] → estrépito m
we couldn't hear because of the loudness of the musicla música estaba tan alta que no nos dejaba oír
2. [of clothes, colour] → lo llamativo

loudness

n
(= volume)Lautstärke f; the loudness of his voiceseine laute Stimme
(= obtrusiveness)Aufdringlichkeit f; (of colour)Grellheit f; (of clothes)Buntheit f

loudness

[ˈlaʊdnɪs] n (see adj) → forza, fragorosità, rumorosità, chiassosità

loud

(laud) adjective
1. making a great sound; not quiet. a loud voice; loud music.
2. showy; too bright and harsh. loud colours; a loud shirt.
ˈloudly adverb
ˈloudness noun
ˌloud-ˈhailer noun
a simple type of loudspeaker. The police used a loud-hailer to tell the crowd to get back.
ˌloudˈspeaker noun
1. an instrument for increasing the loudness of sounds so that they can be heard further away. The politician addressed the crowds from his car through a loudspeaker.
2. a speaker in a radio, record-player etc.
References in classic literature ?
In a minute, the number and loudness of the voices indicated that the whole party was collected in and around that secret place.
The older a person grows, Harriet, the more important it is that their manners should not be bad; the more glaring and disgusting any loudness, or coarseness, or awkwardness becomes.
To judge from the conduct of the opposite parties, we shall be led to conclude that they will mutually hope to evince the justness of their opinions, and to increase the number of their converts by the loudness of their declamations and the bitterness of their invectives.
de Treville; but a fresh allusion soon brought back the conversation to his Eminence, and then the laughter recovered its loudness and the light was not withheld from any of his actions.
My tone had a borrowed loudness reverberated from the height of the land.
rejoined Toby, with a rapidity and loudness of utterance that almost led me to suspect he had been slyly devouring the broadside of an ox in some of the adjoining thickets.
The suddenness, the loudness of it made the ensuing silence on both sides of the door perfectly awful.
The ancient story of failure, ill-luck, undeserved disaster, went down the wind, disconnected syllables flying past Ralph's ears with a queer alternation of loudness and faintness as if, at certain moments, the man's memory of his wrongs revived and then flagged, dying down at last into a grumble of resignation, which seemed to represent a final lapse into the accustomed despair.
Of the loudness of the young lady's voice there could be no sort of doubt.
I implored, catching her by the arm, and terrified beyond measure by the loudness of her mirth.
And the unwonted loudness of the voice--his voice--breaking the habitual stillness of that hour would have startled a person having much less reason to be constantly apprehensive, than the captive of Anthony's masterful generosity.
Just as Sophia arrived at the conclusion of her story, there arrived in the room where the two ladies were sitting a noise, not unlike, in loudness, to that of a pack of hounds just let out from their kennel; nor, in shrillness, to cats, when caterwauling; or to screech owls; or, indeed, more like (for what animal can resemble a human voice?