louvre


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lou·ver

also lou·vre  (lo͞o′vər)
n.
1.
a. A framed opening, as in a wall, door, or window, fitted with fixed or movable horizontal slats for admitting air or light and often for shedding rain.
b. One of the slats used in such an opening.
c. One of the narrow openings formed by such slats.
2. A slatted, ventilating opening, as on the hood of a motor vehicle.
3. A lantern-shaped cupola on the roof of a medieval building for admitting air and providing for the escape of smoke.

[Middle English lover, skylight, chimney, from Old French, from Middle Dutch love, gallery, from Middle High German lauble.]

lou′vered adj.

louvre

(ˈluːvə) or

louver

n
1. (Architecture)
a. any of a set of horizontal parallel slats in a door or window, sloping outwards to throw off rain and admit air
b. Also called: louvre boards the slats together with the frame supporting them
2. (Architecture) architect a lantern or turret that allows smoke to escape
[C14: from Old French lovier, of obscure origin]

Louvre

(French luvrə)
n
(Placename) the national museum and art gallery of France, in Paris: formerly a royal palace, begun in 1546; used for its present purpose since 1793
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.louvre - an art museum that is a famous tourist attraction in ParisLouvre - an art museum that is a famous tourist attraction in Paris
capital of France, City of Light, French capital, Paris - the capital and largest city of France; and international center of culture and commerce
2.louvre - one of a set of parallel slats in a door or window to admit air and reject rainlouvre - one of a set of parallel slats in a door or window to admit air and reject rain
jalousie - a shutter made of angled slats
slat, spline - a thin strip (wood or metal)
Translations

louvre

louver (US) [ˈluːvəʳ] N (Archit) → lumbrera f; (= blind) → persiana f

louvre

[ˈluːvər] (British) louver (US) adj [door, window] → à claire-voie

louvre

, (US) louver
nJalousie f; louvre doorLamellentür f

louvre

louver (Am) [ˈluːvəʳ] adj (door, window) → con apertura a gelosia
References in classic literature ?
Rainy days I spend in the Louvre, revelling in pictures.
Today I am in Paris, tomorrow in Berlin, anon in Rome; but you would look for me in vain in the galleries of the Louvre or the common resorts of the gazers in those other capitals.
He read of the swallows that fly in and out of the little cafe at Smyrna where the Hadjis sit counting their amber beads and the turbaned merchants smoke their long tasselled pipes and talk gravely to each other; he read of the Obelisk in the Place de la Concorde that weeps tears of granite in its lonely sunless exile and longs to be back by the hot, lotus-covered Nile, where there are Sphinxes, and rose-red ibises, and white vultures with gilded claws, and crocodiles with small beryl eyes that crawl over the green steaming mud; he began to brood over those verses which, drawing music from kiss-stained marble, tell of that curious statue that Gautier compares to a contralto voice, the "monstre charmant" that couches in the porphyry-room of the Louvre.
To give an idea of the amount of water that was pumped up, I can tell the reader that it represented the area of the courtyard of the Louvre and a height half as deep again as the towers of Notre Dame.
Next he went to the Quai de Feraille to have a new blade put to his sword, and then returned toward the Louvre, inquiring of the first Musketeer he met for the situation of the hotel of M.
or Richelieu -- for two of these arm-chairs, adorned with a carved shield, on which were engraved the fleur-de-lis of France on an azure field evidently came from the Louvre, or, at least, some royal residence.
At the Louvre it is very different, and if I were at the Louvre I should rely upon my brigadier; but, when traveling, sire, no one knows what may happen, and I prefer doing my duty myself.
On a brilliant day in May, in the year 1868, a gentleman was reclining at his ease on the great circular divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre, in the Museum of the Louvre.
If you're after Art, you want to stick to the galleries; you want to go right through the Louvre, room by room; you want to take a room a day, or something of that sort.
It was like meeting an old friend when we read Rue de Rivoli on the street corner; we knew the genuine vast palace of the Louvre as well as we knew its picture; when we passed by the Column of July we needed no one to tell us what it was or to remind us that on its site once stood the grim Bastille, that grave of human hopes and happiness, that dismal prison house within whose dungeons so many young faces put on the wrinkles of age, so many proud spirits grew humble, so many brave hearts broke.
I spent long hours in the Louvre, the most friendly of all galleries and the most convenient for meditation; or idled on the quays, fingering second-hand books that I never meant to buy.
The City had Notre-Dame; the Town, the Louvre and the Hôtel de Ville; the University, the Sorbonne.