low-paid

low-paid

adj
1. earning very little money
2. supplying very little money
Translations

low-paid

[ˌləʊˈpeɪd]
A. ADJ [work] → mal pagado (more frm) → de baja remuneración; [worker] → mal pagado (more frm) → mal remunerado
B. NPL the low-paidlos mal pagados or (more frm) remunerados

low-paid

[ˌləʊˈpeɪd] adjmal pagato/a
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular we supported the reviews highlighting of practices for some low-paid workers, which in some cases result in one-way flexibility benefiting only the employer.
The share of low-paid men earning less than PS175 a week (a third of the typical male weekly wage) has increased by 70% over the last 20 years, while the share of higher-paid men earning more than PS1,060 (double the typical weekly wage) has increased by 15%, the research found.
BRITONS are burdened with higher housing costs, longer working hours and more low-paid work compared with many other developed nations, a report has found.
The country witnessed the biggest year-on-year fall in low pay since 1977, but the UK is still too reliant on low-paid work, the Resolution Foundation said.
PARENTS in low-paid jobs in Yorkshire are being penalised by bad bosses, a report has claimed.
But he added: "While the suggested increase is in line with the Central Bank's own pay growth forecasts, it will bring little relief or respite to low-paid workers struggling to keep up with cost of living hikes.
It shows that while one in five employees were low-paid (on less than two-thirds of typical weekly earnings) last year, about half of the full-time self-employed workforce fell below the threshold.
THE wages of low-paid workers will increase four times faster than average earnings this year, according to a new study.
Indeed, in its 2015 report, the Low Pay Commission noted that "there is comparatively little published data regarding the low-paid in Ireland" (2015:29), a deficit this paper has attempted to address.
But once again it isn't the professional passenger, who can recover their costs through expenses - it is the worker who has to commute to low-paid jobs where there are no expenses and certainly no way to pass on their costs.
The record figure is up 250,000 on last year and means Britain now has a higher proportion of low-paid full-timers than most developed countries, a report reveals.
The increase partly reflected growth in employment, but there was also a reverse in the previous year's slight fall in low-paid work, said the think tank.