low-rent


Also found in: Idioms.

low-rent

(lō′rĕnt′)
adj. Informal
1. Having inexpensive rent: a low-rent apartment.
2. Of low social status or moral character: "Steve Buscemi ... may play low-rent, amoral types—hit men, weasels, snivelers—but ... he's more complicated than that" (Richard Leiby).
3. Lacking taste or refinement: a low-rent television drama.

low-rent

adj
informal cheap and inferior: low-rent films.

low′-rent′


adj.
Informal. second-rate; bargain-basement.
[1955–60]
Translations

low-rent

[ˈləʊrent] ADJ
1. (lit) [housing, flat] → de renta baja, de alquiler bajo
2. (fig) → de tres al cuarto, de pacotilla
References in periodicals archive ?
Poor Grisham seems to be stuck on a legal treadmill as a high-flying Harvard graduate joins a low-rent Chcago law firm.
The State's highest court has ruled that flat-dollar rent increases on low-rent apartments, a measure promulgated by the New York City Rent Guidelines Board in 2008 and 2009, are lawful.
History During the '80s, then low-rent Chelsea began to attract gays, though despite its beautiful loft spaces it was known as the ugly stepsister to the West Village.
The measure would have allowed for continuing, though limited, office construction but would have outlawed large-scale construction in traditionally low-rent and industrial areas.
Although tenants call the low-rent supplement the "poor tax," income studies show that there are many low rent units occupied by high income families.
He also wants the RGB to allow a low-rent supplement because it is still very significant to owners.
Since the median income for apartments renting for less than $450 is $15,000, Michael McKee of the New York State Tenants & Neighbors Coalition called the proposed $15 low-rent supplement a "poor tax.