loxodrome


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lox·o·drome

 (lŏk′sə-drōm′)
[Greek loxos, slanting + Greek dromos, course.]

lox′o·drom′ic (-drŏm′ĭk), lox′o·drom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
lox′o·drom′i·cal·ly adv.

loxodrome

(ˈlɒksəˌdrəʊm)
n
(Mathematics) maths an imaginary line on the surface of a sphere that crosses all meridians at the same angle, known also as a rhumb line
Also called: rhumb line

rhumb′ line`


n.
the path of a ship that maintains a constant compass direction.
[1660–70]

loxodrome

a rhumb line or curve on the surface of a sphere intersecting all meridians at the same angle; hence, the course of a ship or aircraft following a constant compass direction. — loxodromic, adj.
See also: Geography
a rhumb line or curve on the surface of a sphere intersecting all meridians at the same angle; hence, the course of a ship or aircraft following a constant compass direction. — loxodromic, adj.
See also: Ships
a rhumb line or curve on the surface of a sphere intersecting all meridians at the same angle; hence, the course of a ship or aircraft following a constant compass direction. — loxodromic, adj.
See also: Maps
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loxodrome - a line on a sphere that cuts all meridians at the same angle; the path taken by a ship or plane that maintains a constant compass direction
line - a spatial location defined by a real or imaginary unidimensional extent
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
A ship will follow a loxodrome, or rhumb line, by maintaining a constant compass reading that can only be plotted on a Mercator chart with accuracy.
The map is adorned with sketches including drawings of ships, sea monsters, compass roses surmounted by fleur-de-lis, and loxodromes in red, yellow and black.
The decorative aspects of the Bonaparte map including the coloured loxodromes, the use of gold, drawings of sea monsters and other artistic embellishments belong to a style perfected by professional mapmakers and artists in Amsterdam in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.