lubricious

(redirected from lubriciously)
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lu·bri·cious

 (lo͞o-brĭsh′əs) also lu·bri·cous (lo͞o′brĭ-kəs)
adj.
1.
a. Full of or displaying sexual desire: "They fell immediately into an orgy of lubricious kissing" (Joseph Heller).
b. Sexually stimulating; salacious: a book of lubricious photographs.
2. Having a slippery or smooth quality: "Throughout the empire a lubricious glaze of venality came to coat every governmental surface" (Cullen Murphy).

[Alteration of lubricous, from Latin lūbricus, slippery; see sleubh- in Indo-European roots.]

lu·bri′cious·ly adv.
lu·bri′cious·ness n.

lubricious

(luːˈbrɪʃəs) or

lubricous

adj
1. formal or literary lewd, lascivious
2. rare oily or slippery
[C16: from Latin lūbricus]
luˈbriciously, ˈlubricously adv

lu•bri•cious

(luˈbrɪʃ əs)

adj.
1. arousing or expressive of sexual desire.
2. smooth and slippery.
[1575–85]
lu•bri′cious•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lubricious - having a smooth or slippery quality; "the skin of cephalopods is thin and lubricious"
slippery, slippy - causing or tending to cause things to slip or slide; "slippery sidewalks"; "a slippery bar of soap"; "the streets are still slippy from the rain"
2.lubricious - characterized by lust; "eluding the lubricious embraces of her employer"; "her sensuous grace roused his lustful nature"; "prurient literature"; "prurient thoughts"; "a salacious rooster of a little man"
sexy - marked by or tending to arouse sexual desire or interest; "feeling sexy"; "sexy clothes"; "sexy poses"; "a sexy book"; "sexy jokes"

lubricious

adjective
1. So smooth and glassy as to offer insecure hold or footing:
Translations

lubricious

[luːˈbrɪʃəs] ADJ (frm or liter) (= lewd) → lascivo
References in periodicals archive ?
Her buyer is a Seville painter lubriciously obsessed with her virginity.
26) For example, in his Variety review, Derek Elley describes the film as "a lusciously lensed, lubriciously limned costumer .
Le Peuple', one of a series on the theme of sexual initiation variously entitled 'Derriere le rideau', 'Passe minuit' or 'Premiers pas', portrays a robustly and lubriciously proletarian wench in stockings, garters and white bonnet (Bory, 1977: 467, 404, 401, 416).