lucidity


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to lucidity: Lucid Dreaming

lu·cid

 (lo͞o′sĭd)
adj.
1. Clearly expressed; easily understood: a lucid analysis of the problem.
2. Thinking or expressing oneself clearly, especially between periods of confusion; clearheaded: The feverish patient was lucid now and then.
3. Brightly lit; luminous: "A lucid yellow moon was rising when Luke wheeled his truck to the curb and got out" (Willie Morris).
4. Clear; transparent: a lucid stream.

[Latin lūcidus, from lūcēre, to shine; see leuk- in Indo-European roots.]

lu·cid′i·ty, lu′cid·ness n.
lu′cid·ly adv.

lucidity

the quality, state, or art of clarity in thought and style. — lucidness, n. — lucid, adj.
See also: Language Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lucidity - free from obscurity and easy to understand; the comprehensibility of clear expression
comprehensibility, understandability - the quality of comprehensible language or thought
monosemy - having a single meaning (absence of ambiguity) usually of individual words or phrases
focus - maximum clarity or distinctness of an idea; "the controversy brought clearly into focus an important difference of opinion"
clearcutness, preciseness - clarity as a consequence of precision
perspicuity, perspicuousness, plainness - clarity as a consequence of being perspicuous
unambiguity, unequivocalness - clarity achieved by the avoidance of ambiguity
explicitness - clarity as a consequence of being explicit
2.lucidity - a lucid state of mind; not confused
saneness, sanity - normal or sound powers of mind

lucidity

noun
1. The quality of being clear and easy to perceive or understand:
2. A healthy mental state:
lucidness, mind, reason, saneness, sanity, sense (often used in plural), soundness, wit (used in plural).
Slang: marble (used in plural).
Translations

lucidity

[luːˈsɪdɪtɪ] Nlucidez f

lucidity

[luːˈsɪdɪti] nlucidité f

lucidity

nKlarheit f; (of explanation)Anschaulichkeit f

lucidity

[luːˈsɪdɪtɪ] n (of person) → lucidità; (of instructions) → chiarezza

lu·cid·i·ty

n. claridad, esp. mental.
References in classic literature ?
My lucidity must have seemed awful, but the charming creatures who were victims of it, passing and repassing in their interlocked sweetness, gave my colleague something to hold on by; and I felt how tight she held as, without stirring in the breath of my passion, she covered them still with her eyes.
But of all there were none he liked so well as those of the famous Feliciano de Silva's composition, for their lucidity of style and complicated conceits were as pearls in his sight, particularly when in his reading he came upon courtships and cartels, where he often found passages like "the reason of the unreason with which my reason is afflicted so weakens my reason that with reason I murmur at your beauty;" or again, "the high heavens, that of your divinity divinely fortify you with the stars, render you deserving of the desert your greatness deserves.
And sometime under the liquor drug, snatches of wisdom came to him far more lucidity than in his sober moments, as, for instance, one night, when he sat on the edge of the bed with one shoe in his hand and meditated on Dede's aphorism to the effect that he could not sleep in more than one bed at a time.
Struggling against the charm that seemed to deprive him of all his will and all his energy and of almost all his lucidity at the moment when he needed them most, he succeeded in drawing back the curtain that hid him and he walked to where Christine stood.
It was very lucky perhaps for me that in a way I was like a very sick man who has yet preserved all his lucidity.
Her quiet lucidity startled him, but did not mislead him into thinking her insensible.
For an instant, as rapid as the lightning's flash, her eyes had that lucidity, devoid of mind, which we admire in the eye of birds; then passing her hand across her brow with the keen expression of one who meditates, she contemplated the living memory of a past scene spread before her, and, turning quickly to Philippe, she SAW HIM.
The change of movement and position, the sight of the lamps twinkling to the rear, and the smell of damp and mould and rotten straw which clung about the vehicle, wrought in him strange alternations of lucidity and mortal giddiness.
In fact with incredible rapidity and marvelous lucidity, Fouquet deciphered the largest papers and most complicated writings, correcting them, annotating them with a pen moved as if by a fever, and the work melting under his hands, signatures, figures, references, became multiplied as if ten clerks -- that is to say, a hundred fingers and ten brains had performed the duties, instead of the five fingers and single brain of this man.
So he thought in rare moments of lucidity, but his usual state of mind was one of weariness and a tender pity for himself because of that weariness.
enhancement of the lucidity of the thought and value of the work.
Others he caught and criticized with admirable lucidity.