lug


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Lug

 (lo͞o, lo͞og) or Lugh (lo͞o)
n.
The ancient Celtic god of artisanship and warriors. He was said to be the father of Cuchulain.

[Old Irish.]

lug 1

 (lŭg)
n.
1. A handle or projection used as a hold or support.
2. A lug nut.
3. Nautical A lugsail.
4. A projecting part of a larger piece that helps to provide traction, as on a tire or the sole of a boot.
5. A copper or brass fitting to which electrical wires can be soldered or otherwise connected.
6. Slang A clumsy fool; a blockhead.

[Middle English lugge, earflap, probably of Scandinavian origin.]

lug 2

 (lŭg)
v. lugged, lug·ging, lugs
v.tr.
1. To drag or haul (an object) laboriously.
2. To pull or drag with short jerks.
3. To cause (an engine, for example) to run poorly or hesitate: If you drive too slowly in third gear, you'll lug the engine.
v.intr.
1. To pull something with difficulty; tug.
2. To move along by jerks or as if under a heavy burden.
3. To run poorly or hesitate because of strain. Used of an engine: The motor lugs on hills.
n.
1. Archaic
a. The act of lugging.
b. Something lugged.
2. A box for shipping fruit or vegetables.

[Middle English luggen, of Scandinavian origin.]

lug

(lʌɡ)
vb, lugs, lugging or lugged
1. to carry or drag (something heavy) with great effort
2. (tr) to introduce (an irrelevant topic) into a conversation or discussion
3. (Nautical Terms) (tr) (of a sailing vessel) to carry too much (sail) for the amount of wind blowing
n
the act or an instance of lugging
[C14: probably from Scandinavian; apparently related to Norwegian lugge to pull by the hair]

lug

(lʌɡ)
n
1. a projecting piece by which something is connected, supported, or lifted
2. Also called: tug a leather loop used in harness for various purposes
3. a box or basket for vegetables or fruit with a capacity of 28 to 40 pounds
4. (Anatomy) dialect Scot and Northern English another word for ear1
5. slang a man, esp a stupid or awkward one
[C15 (Scots dialect) lugge ear, perhaps related to lug1 (in the sense: to pull by the ear)]

lug

(lʌɡ)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical short for lugsail

lug

(lʌɡ)
n
(Animals) short for lugworm
[C16: origin uncertain]

lug1

(lʌg)

v. lugged, lug•ging,
n. v.t.
1. to pull or carry with force or effort: to lug a heavy suitcase upstairs.
2. to introduce or interject inappropriately or irrelevantly: to lug personalities into a discussion of philosophy.
3. (of a sailing ship) to carry an excessive amount of (sail) for the conditions prevailing.
v.i.
4. to pull or tug laboriously.
5. (of an engine or machine) to jerk, hesitate, or strain.
n.
6. an act or instance of lugging; a forcible pull.
7. a wooden box for transporting fruit or vegetables.
8. Slang. a request for or exaction of money, as for political purposes: They put the lug on him at the office.
[1300–50; Middle English luggen < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian lugge, Swedish lugga to pull by the hair]

lug2

(lʌg)

n.
1. a projecting piece by which anything is held or supported.
2. a ridge or welt that helps to provide traction, as on a tire or the sole of a shoe.
3. a leather loop hanging down from a saddle, through which a shaft is passed for support.
4. Slang.
a. an awkward, clumsy fellow.
b. a blockhead.
c. a man; guy.
[1485–95; < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian, Swedish lugg forelock. See lug1]

lug3

(lʌg)

n.
[by shortening]

lug


Past participle: lugged
Gerund: lugging

Imperative
lug
lug
Present
I lug
you lug
he/she/it lugs
we lug
you lug
they lug
Preterite
I lugged
you lugged
he/she/it lugged
we lugged
you lugged
they lugged
Present Continuous
I am lugging
you are lugging
he/she/it is lugging
we are lugging
you are lugging
they are lugging
Present Perfect
I have lugged
you have lugged
he/she/it has lugged
we have lugged
you have lugged
they have lugged
Past Continuous
I was lugging
you were lugging
he/she/it was lugging
we were lugging
you were lugging
they were lugging
Past Perfect
I had lugged
you had lugged
he/she/it had lugged
we had lugged
you had lugged
they had lugged
Future
I will lug
you will lug
he/she/it will lug
we will lug
you will lug
they will lug
Future Perfect
I will have lugged
you will have lugged
he/she/it will have lugged
we will have lugged
you will have lugged
they will have lugged
Future Continuous
I will be lugging
you will be lugging
he/she/it will be lugging
we will be lugging
you will be lugging
they will be lugging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been lugging
you have been lugging
he/she/it has been lugging
we have been lugging
you have been lugging
they have been lugging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been lugging
you will have been lugging
he/she/it will have been lugging
we will have been lugging
you will have been lugging
they will have been lugging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been lugging
you had been lugging
he/she/it had been lugging
we had been lugging
you had been lugging
they had been lugging
Conditional
I would lug
you would lug
he/she/it would lug
we would lug
you would lug
they would lug
Past Conditional
I would have lugged
you would have lugged
he/she/it would have lugged
we would have lugged
you would have lugged
they would have lugged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lug - ancient Celtic god
Emerald Isle, Hibernia, Ireland - an island comprising the republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland
antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
2.lug - a sail with four corners that is hoisted from a yard that is oblique to the mastlug - a sail with four corners that is hoisted from a yard that is oblique to the mast
fore-and-aft sail - any sail not set on a yard and whose normal position is in a fore-and-aft direction
junk - any of various Chinese boats with a high poop and lugsails
lugger - small fishing boat rigged with one or more lugsails
3.lug - a projecting piece that is used to lift or support or turn something
lug wrench - a wrench with jaws that have projecting lugs to engage the object that is to be rotated
projection - any structure that branches out from a central support
4.lug - marine worms having a row of tufted gills along each side of the backlug - marine worms having a row of tufted gills along each side of the back; often used for fishing bait
class Polychaeta, Polychaeta - marine annelid worms
polychaete, polychaete worm, polychete, polychete worm - chiefly marine annelids possessing both sexes and having paired appendages (parapodia) bearing bristles
Verb1.lug - carry with difficultylug - carry with difficulty; "You'll have to lug this suitcase"
carry, transport - move while supporting, either in a vehicle or in one's hands or on one's body; "You must carry your camping gear"; "carry the suitcases to the car"; "This train is carrying nuclear waste"; "These pipes carry waste water into the river"
2.lug - obstructlug - obstruct; "My nose is all stuffed"; "Her arteries are blocked"
clog, clog up, congest, choke off, foul, back up, choke - become or cause to become obstructed; "The leaves clog our drains in the Fall"; "The water pipe is backed up"

lug

verb drag, carry, pull, haul, tow, yank, hump (Brit. slang), heave Nobody wants to lug around huge heavy suitcases.

lug 1

noun
Slang. A large, ungainly, and dull-witted person:
Informal: lummox.

lug 2

verb
To move while supporting:
Informal: tote.
Slang: schlep.
Translations
يَسْحَب، يَجُر
vléci
haleslæbe
draga, drösla
stieptvilkt

lug

[lʌg]
A. VT (= drag) → arrastrar, jalar (LAm); (= carry) → cargar (con trabajo)
I've been lugging this camera around with me all dayllevo cargando con esta cámara todo el día
they lugged him off to the theatrelo llevaron a rastras al teatro
he lugged the cases upstairsllevó a rastras las maletas al piso de arriba
B. N
1. (= projecting part) → oreja f, agarradera f (Tech) → orejeta f
2. (= ear) → oreja f
3. (= loop) (on harness) lazada de cuero de los arreos
4. = lugsail

lug

[ˈlʌg] vttraîner, tirer

lug

1
n
(= earflap)Klappe f; (Tech) → Haltevorrichtung f
(esp Brit inf: = ear) → Ohr nt

lug

3
vtschleppen; (towards one) → zerren; to lug something around with oneetw mit sich herumschleppen; to lug something along behind oneetw hinter sich (dat)herschleppen

lug

[lʌg] vt (fam) → trascinare

lug

(lag) past tense, past participle lugged verb
to drag with difficulty. She lugged the heavy trunk across the floor.
References in classic literature ?
Blast ye, Captain Bildad, if I had followed thy advice in these matters, I would afore now had a conscience to lug about that would be heavy enough to founder the largest ship that ever sailed round Cape Horn.
I HED aimed to dee wheare I'd sarved fur sixty year; and I thowt I'd lug my books up into t' garret, and all my bits o' stuff, and they sud hev' t' kitchen to theirseln; for t' sake o' quietness.
Wopsle; and I knew he was going to lug me in, before he said it; "might be deduced from that text.
Again: because it is a general complaint, that the favourites of princes are troubled with short and weak memories; the same doctor proposed, "that whoever attended a first minister, after having told his business, with the utmost brevity and in the plainest words, should, at his departure, give the said minister a tweak by the nose, or a kick in the belly, or tread on his corns, or lug him thrice by both ears, or run a pin into his breech; or pinch his arm black and blue, to prevent forgetfulness; and at every levee day, repeat the same operation, till the business were done, or absolutely refused.
The negro servant was summoned, and shortly afterwards was seen assisting the veteran to lug the ponderous sea chest downstairs.
You find a place on the banks that is not quite so puddly as other places you have seen, and you land and lug out the tent, and two of you proceed to fix it.
The last thing I do as maid of all work is to lug upstairs the clothes-basket which has just arrived with the mangling.
The opening was comparatively small, so that after considerable effort I was able to lug up a bowlder from the valley below which entirely blocked it.
That reminds me; one of the boxes Phebe wanted to lug upstairs last night is for you.
I knew he meant to be the last to leave his ship, so I swarmed up as quick as I could, and those damned lunatics up there grab at me from above, lug me in, drag me along aft through the row and the riot of the silliest excitement I ever did see.
he cried; "then we didn't lug a great fat corpse on to a sofa last night?
The whole country heard of it; now he lay sick at home, with his silly family standing round the bed in tears; now he rode from public-house to public-house, and shouted his sorrows into the lug of Tom, Dick, and Harry.