lumbering


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

lum·ber 1

 (lŭm′bər)
n.
1. Timber sawed into boards, planks, or other structural members of standard or specified length.
2. Something useless or cumbersome.
3. Chiefly British Miscellaneous stored articles.
v. lum·bered, lum·ber·ing, lum·bers
v.tr.
1.
a. To cut down (trees) and prepare as marketable timber.
b. To cut down the timber of.
2. Chiefly British To clutter with or as if with unused articles.
v.intr.
To cut and prepare timber for marketing.

[Perhaps from lumber.]

lum′ber adj.
lum′ber·er n.

lum·ber 2

 (lŭm′bər)
intr.v. lum·bered, lum·ber·ing, lum·bers
1. To walk or move clumsily or heavily. See Synonyms at blunder.
2. To move with a rumbling noise.

[Middle English lomeren, possibly of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish dialectal loma, to move heavily.]

lum′ber·ing·ly adv.

lumbering

(ˈlʌmbərɪŋ)
n
(Forestry) chiefly US and Canadian the business or trade of cutting, transporting, preparing, or selling timber

lumbering

(ˈlʌmbərɪŋ)
adj
1. awkward in movement
2. moving with a rumbling sound
ˈlumberingly adv
ˈlumberingness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lumbering - the trade of cutting or preparing or selling timberlumbering - the trade of cutting or preparing or selling timber
craft, trade - the skilled practice of a practical occupation; "he learned his trade as an apprentice"
Adj.1.lumbering - slow and laborious because of weight; "the heavy tread of tired troops"; "moved with a lumbering sag-bellied trot"; "ponderous prehistoric beasts"; "a ponderous yawn"
heavy-footed - (of movement) lacking ease or lightness; "his tired heavy-footed walk"

lumbering

Translations

lumbering

1 [ˈlʌmbərɪŋ] N (US) → explotación f forestal

lumbering

2 [ˈlʌmbərɪŋ] ADJ [gait, run] → pesado, torpe

lumbering

1
adj cartrumpelnd; elephant, persontrampelnd; beartapsig; tankschwer, klobig; gaitschwerfällig

lumbering

2
n (US) → Holzfällen nt, → Holzfällerei f

lumbering

[ˈlʌmbrɪŋ] adjgoffo/a
References in classic literature ?
So the guard of the Dover mail thought to himself, that Friday night in November, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-five, lumbering up Shooter's Hill, as he stood on his own particular perch behind the mail, beating his feet, and keeping an eye and a hand on the arm-chest before him, where a loaded blunderbuss lay at the top of six or eight loaded horse-pistols, deposited on a substratum of cutlass.
But the seaman of the last generation, brought into sympathy with the caravels of ancient time by his sailing-ship, their lineal descendant, cannot look upon those lumbering forms navigating the naive seas of ancient woodcuts without a feeling of surprise, of affectionate derision, envy, and admiration.