luminescence


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lu·mi·nes·cence

 (lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
n.
1. The emission of light that does not derive energy from the temperature of the emitting body, as in phosphorescence, fluorescence, and bioluminescence. Luminescence is caused by chemical, biochemical, or crystallographic changes, the motions of subatomic particles, or radiation-induced excitation of an atomic system.
2. The light so emitted.

luminescence

(ˌluːmɪˈnɛsəns)
n
(General Physics) physics
a. the emission of light at low temperatures by any process other than incandescence, such as phosphorescence or chemiluminescence
b. the light emitted by such a process
[C19: from Latin lūmen light]
ˌlumiˈnescent adj

lu•mi•nes•cence

(ˌlu məˈnɛs əns)

n.
1. the emission of light not caused by incandescence and occurring at a temperature below that of incandescent bodies.
2. the light produced by such an emission.
[1885–90; < Latin lūmin- light + -escence]
lu`mi•nes′cent, adj.

lu·mi·nes·cence

(lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
1. The emission of light as a result of the excitation of atoms by a source of energy other than heat. Bioluminescence, fluorescence, and phosphorescence are examples of luminescence that can be produced by biological or chemical processes.
2. The light produced in this way.

luminescence

Light emission from a substance caused by an effect other than heat. Fluorescence and phosphorescence are forms of luminescence.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.luminescence - light not due to incandescenceluminescence - light not due to incandescence; occurs at low temperatures
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
bioluminescence - luminescence produced by physiological processes (as in the firefly)
chemiluminescence - luminescence resulting from a chemical reaction as the oxidation of luciferin in fireflies
2.luminescence - light from nonthermal sources
brightness level, luminance, luminosity, luminousness, brightness, light - the quality of being luminous; emitting or reflecting light; "its luminosity is measured relative to that of our sun"
Translations

luminescence

[ˌluːmɪˈnesns] Nluminescencia f

luminescence

nLumineszenz f (spec), → Leuchten nt

lu·mi·nes·cence

n. luminosidad, emisión de luz sin producción de calor.
References in periodicals archive ?
And if that's the case, he says, "I'd be willing to bet pitchers of beer that cracking knuckles will also generate small amounts of luminescence.
The judges also saw a renewed interest in colors and the use of authentic materials and continued application of curves and luminescence.
If you walk briskly through a room of Vermeers in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam without even staring at them, you still catch flashes of luminescence peripherally.
The September 1993 editorial (ANTIQUITY 65: 44-5) made comment on recent Australian dates, by luminescence techniques, significantly older than radiocarbon determinations from elsewhere in Australia and New Guinea, which formed a single continent in the late Pleistocene.
Studying luminescence will probably yield more basic knowledge than practical applications, says Bonard.
Intended as a handy reference guide for experienced engineers and a tutorial for engineers who want to deepen their knowledge of UV sensors, the EMX "UV Luminescence Sensor Application Handbook" has been updated with new application descriptions, including control of wood optimizing saws, and control of glue dispensing on packaging.
The subject of the public contract is a device that allows you to measure the luminescence spectrum, depending on the energy of the excitation radiation, which is adjustable in the range of 250 nm-2350 nm (combination xe lamp and white laser).
Perhaps the majority of fish and squid in the dimly lit water 200 to 1,000 meters below the surface use similar luminescence to disguise their shapes, Widder explains.
Finding luminescence in any of the known octopus species surprised codiscoverer Edith A.
For further information on EMX's luminescence, color and brightness sensors contact EMX Industries Inc.
He excited luminescence and traced how quickly the light died away.
Increasing the luminescence efficiency of carbon nanotubes may someday make it possible for doctors to inject patients with microscopic nanotubes to detect tumors, arterial blockages and other internal problems.