lunge


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lunge

 (lŭnj)
n.
1. A sudden thrust or pass, as with a sword.
2. A sudden forward movement or plunge.
v. lunged, lung·ing, lung·es
v.intr.
1. To make a sudden thrust or pass.
2. To move with a sudden thrust.
v.tr.
To cause (someone) to lunge.

[From alteration of obsolete allonge, to thrust, from French allonger, from Old French alongier, to lengthen : a-, to (from Latin ad-; see ad-) + long, long (from Latin longus; see del- in Indo-European roots).]

lunge

(lʌndʒ)
n
1. a sudden forward motion
2. (Fencing) fencing a thrust made by advancing the front foot and straightening the back leg, extending the sword arm forwards
vb
3. to move or cause to move with a lunge
4. (Fencing) (intr) fencing to make a lunge
[C18: shortened form of obsolete C17 allonge, from French allonger to stretch out (one's arm), from Late Latin ēlongāre to lengthen. Compare elongate]
ˈlunger n

lunge

(lʌndʒ)
n
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a rope used in training or exercising a horse
vb
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (tr) to exercise or train (a horse) on a lunge
[C17: from Old French longe, shortened from allonge, ultimately from Latin longus long1; related to lunge1]

lunge

(lʌndʒ)

n., v. lunged, lung•ing. n.
1. a sudden forward thrust, as with a sword or knife; stab.
2. any sudden forward movement; plunge.
v.i.
3. to make a lunge or thrust; move with a lunge.
v.t.
4. to thrust (something) forward; cause to lunge: lunging a finger accusingly.
[1725–35; earlier longe for French allonge (n.; construed as a longe), allonger (v.) to lengthen, extend, deliver (blows) < Vulgar Latin *allongāre, for Late Latin ēlongāre to elongate]
lung′er, n.

lunge


Past participle: lunged
Gerund: lunging

Imperative
lunge
lunge
Present
I lunge
you lunge
he/she/it lunges
we lunge
you lunge
they lunge
Preterite
I lunged
you lunged
he/she/it lunged
we lunged
you lunged
they lunged
Present Continuous
I am lunging
you are lunging
he/she/it is lunging
we are lunging
you are lunging
they are lunging
Present Perfect
I have lunged
you have lunged
he/she/it has lunged
we have lunged
you have lunged
they have lunged
Past Continuous
I was lunging
you were lunging
he/she/it was lunging
we were lunging
you were lunging
they were lunging
Past Perfect
I had lunged
you had lunged
he/she/it had lunged
we had lunged
you had lunged
they had lunged
Future
I will lunge
you will lunge
he/she/it will lunge
we will lunge
you will lunge
they will lunge
Future Perfect
I will have lunged
you will have lunged
he/she/it will have lunged
we will have lunged
you will have lunged
they will have lunged
Future Continuous
I will be lunging
you will be lunging
he/she/it will be lunging
we will be lunging
you will be lunging
they will be lunging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been lunging
you have been lunging
he/she/it has been lunging
we have been lunging
you have been lunging
they have been lunging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been lunging
you will have been lunging
he/she/it will have been lunging
we will have been lunging
you will have been lunging
they will have been lunging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been lunging
you had been lunging
he/she/it had been lunging
we had been lunging
you had been lunging
they had been lunging
Conditional
I would lunge
you would lunge
he/she/it would lunge
we would lunge
you would lunge
they would lunge
Past Conditional
I would have lunged
you would have lunged
he/she/it would have lunged
we would have lunged
you would have lunged
they would have lunged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lunge - the act of moving forward suddenlylunge - the act of moving forward suddenly  
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
2.lunge - (fencing) an attacking thrust made with one foot forward and the back leg straight and with the sword arm outstretched forward
fencing - the art or sport of fighting with swords (especially the use of foils or epees or sabres to score points under a set of rules)
knife thrust, stab, thrust - a strong blow with a knife or other sharp pointed instrument; "one strong stab to the heart killed him"
remise - (fencing) a second thrust made on the same lunge (as when your opponent fails to riposte)
Verb1.lunge - make a thrusting forward movement
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
dart - move with sudden speed; "His forefinger darted in all directions as he spoke"
riposte - make a return thrust; "his opponent riposted"

lunge

verb
1. pounce, charge, bound, dive, leap, plunge, dash, thrust, poke, jab I lunged forward to try to hit him.
noun
1. thrust, charge, pounce, pass, spring, swing, jab, swipe (informal) He knocked on the door and made a lunge for her when she opened it.

lunge

verb
1. To move or thrust at, under, or into the midst of with sudden force:
dive, plunge, wade in (or into).
2. To move or advance against strong resistance:
Translations
إنْدفاع، طَعْنَهيَنْدَفِع نَحْو العَدو
výpadzaútočit
kaste sigudfald
hirtelen szúrás
òegar e-r ræîst skyndilega aî e-mstökkva snögglega á
izklupiensizrāviensmestiesrauties uz priekšu
saldırışsaldırmak

lunge

[lʌndʒ]
A. Narremetida f, embestida f (Fencing) → estocada f
B. VI (also lunge forward) → arremeter, embestir (Fencing) → dar una estocada
to lunge at sth/sb (with sth)arremeter contra algo/algn (con algo), lanzarse or abalanzarse sobre algo/algn (con algo)

lunge

[ˈlʌndʒ]
n
to make a lunge for sb/sth → se précipiter sur qn/qch
lunge forward
vifaire un mouvement brusque en avant
lunge at
vt fusfaire un mouvement brusque vers

lunge

nSatz mnach vorn; (esp Fencing) → Ausfall m; he made a lunge at his opponenter stürzte sich auf seinen Gegner; (Fencing) → er machte einen Ausfall
vi(sich) stürzen; (esp Fencing) → einen Ausfall machen; to lunge at somebodysich auf jdn stürzen; the exhausted boxer could only lunge at his opponentder erschöpfte Boxer schlug nur noch wahllos nach seinem Gegner

lunge

[lʌndʒ]
1. nbalzo (in avanti) (Fencing) → affondo
2. vi (also lunge forward) → fare un balzo in avanti
to lunge at sb → balzare su qn
to lunge out with one's fists/feet → tirare dei pugni/calci

lunge

(landʒ) verb
to make a sudden strong or violent forward movement. Her attacker lunged at her with a knife.
noun
a movement of this sort. He made a lunge at her.
References in classic literature ?
For it is plain, that every word we speak is, in some degree, a diminution of our lunge by corrosion, and, consequently, contributes to the shortening of our lives.
Finally in a furious onset of lunge and parry Robin's foot stepped on a rolling stone, and he went down upon his knees.
He made a lunge at Meriem; but her captor swung her to one side, bared his fighting fangs and growled ominously.
He had scarcely finished, when D'Artagnan made such a furious lunge at him that if he had not sprung nimbly backward, it is probable he would have jested for the last time.
And with a terrible lunge, he pierced Buckingham's arm, the sword passing between the two bones.
Mowgli could never learn the guard for that lightning lunge, and, as Kaa said, there was not the least use in trying.
The boisterous Bulmer playfully made a pass at him with his drawn sword, going forward with the lunge in the proper fencing fashion, and making a somewhat too familiar Shakespearean quotation about a rodent and a Venetian coin.
And then ill-luck made its last lunge at their crumbling business and brought it to the ground.
Peter was a superb swordsman, and parried with dazzling rapidity; ever and anon he followed up a feint with a lunge that got past his foe's defence, but his shorter reach stood him in ill stead, and he could not drive the steel home.
When we cut the ropes and removed the blocks that held the Sari in place she started for the water with a lunge.
The great weight of the ape-man thrown suddenly out from an erect position caused the other also to lunge violently forward with the result that to save himself he involuntarily released his grasp.
Steadily and remorselessly the stone knife was driven home through the glossy hide--time and again it drank deep, until with a final agonized lunge and shriek the great feline rolled over upon its side and, save for the spasmodic jerking of its muscles, lay quiet and still in death.