lurid


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lu·rid

 (lo͝or′ĭd)
adj.
1.
a. Characterized by vivid description or explicit details that are meant to provoke or shock: a lurid account of the crime.
b. Characterized by shocking or outrageous behavior: a friend with a lurid past.
2.
a. Bright and intense in color; vivid: "the whole loud overbright town like the lurid midway of a carnival" (Paul Theroux).
b. Sallow or pallid: "She dropped back into the chair ... A lurid pallor stole over her face" (Wilkie Collins).

[Latin lūridus, pale, from lūror, paleness.]

lu′rid·ly adv.
lu′rid·ness n.
Word History: It may seem surprising that English lurid, which sometimes means "vivid," comes from Latin lūridus, "pale, sallow, sickly yellow," used to describe the color of things like skin or teeth. Latin lūridus could also describe horrifying or ghastly things like poisonous herbs or even death itself—things that make a person turn pale. In an account of the volcanic eruption that buried the city of Pompeii, the Roman writer Pliny the Younger used lūridus to describe the unsettling color of the sun shining through a cloud of ash. When lurid first appeared in English in the mid-1600s, it described things that are pale in a sickly or disturbing way. Lurid was also used of gray, overcast skies. In the 1700s, writers began to use lurid to describe the red glow of fire blazing dimly within smoke. In the 1800s, the word acquired an additional meaning, the one it most commonly has today when we reveal the lurid details of a horrifying or sensationalistic story.

lurid

(ˈlʊərɪd; ˈljʊərɪd)
adj
1. vivid in shocking detail; sensational
2. horrible in savagery or violence
3. pallid in colour; wan
4. glowing with an unnatural glare
[C17: from Latin lūridus pale yellow; probably related to lūtum a yellow vegetable dye]
ˈluridly adv
ˈluridness n

lu•rid

(ˈlʊər ɪd)

adj.
1. gruesome; horrible; revolting: the lurid details of an accident.
2. wildly dramatic or sensational; shocking: the lurid tales of pulp magazines.
3. shining with an unnatural, fiery glow; garishly red: a lurid sunset.
4. wan, pallid, or ghastly in hue; livid.
[1650–60; < Latin lūridus sallow, ghastly]
lu′rid•ly, adv.
lu′rid•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lurid - horrible in fierceness or savagery; "lurid crimes"; "a lurid life"
violent - acting with or marked by or resulting from great force or energy or emotional intensity; "a violent attack"; "a violent person"; "violent feelings"; "a violent rage"; "felt a violent dislike"
2.lurid - glaringly vivid and graphic; marked by sensationalism; "lurid details of the accident"
sensational - causing intense interest, curiosity, or emotion
3.lurid - shining with an unnatural red glow as of fire seen through smoke; "a lurid sunset"; "lurid flames"
bright - emitting or reflecting light readily or in large amounts; "the sun was bright and hot"; "a bright sunlit room"
4.lurid - ghastly pale; "moonlight gave the statue a lurid luminence"
colorless, colourless - weak in color; not colorful

lurid

adjective
2. glaring, bright, bloody, intense, flaming, vivid, fiery, livid, sanguine, glowering, overbright She always painted her toenails a lurid red or orange.
glaring pale, pastel, watery

lurid

adjective
Translations
صارِخ، مُتَوَهِّجفَظيع، شَنيع
hrozivě zataženýkřiklavýodporný
skarpuhyggelig
æpandi, logandihryllilegur
žaižaruojantis
drausmīgskliedzošsšausminošsspilgtsugunīgs
hrozivo zatiahnutý

lurid

[ˈljʊərɪd] ADJ
1. (= sordid, prurient) [description, novel, photo, crime] → morboso, escabroso; [imagination, headline] → morboso
in lurid detailsin omitir los detalles más escabrosos
2. (= garish) [colour, tie , shirt] → chillón
a lurid pink dressun vestido (de color) rosa chillón
3. (= unnaturally colourful) [sky, sunset, light] → refulgente

lurid

[ˈljʊərɪd] adj
[account, description, report] (= macabre) → macabre; (referring to sex)scabreux/euse
(= garish) [colour] → criard(e)

lurid

adj
colour, skygrell; dressgrellfarben, in grellen Farben; postersschreiend; a lurid sunset of pinks and orangesein Sonnenuntergang in grellen Rosa- und Orangetönen; her taste in clothes is rather luridsie mag Kleider in ziemlich grellen or schreienden Farben; she was painting her toenails a lurid redsie lackierte sich die Fußnägel grellrot
(fig) language, headline, novel, imaginationreißerisch; (= bloodthirsty)blutrünstig; account, descriptionreißerisch, sensationslüstern; (= sordid) detail, crimewiderlich; photo, imageschaurig; (= prurient)anzüglich; lurid taleSchauergeschichte f; all the love scenes are presented in lurid detaildie Liebesszenen werden in allen widerlichen Einzelheiten dargestellt; lurid details of their quarrelspeinliche Einzelheiten ihrer Streitereien; he has a lurid imaginationer kann sich (dat)die schaurigsten Dinge vorstellen

lurid

[ˈljʊərɪd] adj
a. (details, description, gruesome) → impressionante, sconvolgente; (sensational) → sensazionale, scandalistico/a
b. (colour) → violento/a, sgargiante; (sunset) → fiammeggiante

lurid

(ˈluərid) adjective
1. (too) brightly coloured or vivid. a lurid dress/painting/sky.
2. unpleasantly shocking. the lurid details of his accident.
ˈluridly adverb
ˈluridness noun
References in classic literature ?
Oily brown shadows of faces with a lurid streak in the wrong place, meant Rembrandt.
From the woods, a little further to the south, rose numerous dark and lurid smokes, that were easily to be distinguished from the purer exhalations of the springs, and which the scout also showed to Heyward, as evidences that the enemy lay in force in that direction.
It is a dull yet lurid orange in some places, a sickly sulphur tint in others.
He caught the color of what was passing about him, and threw it back more vividly than he received it, but mixed, nevertheless, with a lurid and portentous hue.
It was whispered by those who peered after her that the scarlet letter threw a lurid gleam along the dark passage-way of the interior.
I had made her a receptacle of lurid things, but there was an odd recognition of my superiority--my accomplishments and my function-- in her patience under my pain.
For in his eyes I read some lurid woe would shrivel me up, had I it.
A softness gathered over the lurid fires of her eye; she looked down, and Tom could feel the relaxing muscles of her hands, as she said,
Of course this novice's report lacked whoop and crash and lurid description, and therefore wanted the true ring; but its antique wording was quaint and sweet and simple, and full of the fragrances and flavors of the time, and these little merits made up in a meas- ure for its more important lacks.
He was breathing forth vast volumes of sulphurous smoke and lurid blasts of flame.
She took off her handkerchief turban and dressed her glossy wealth of hair "like white folks"; she added some odds and ends of rather lurid ribbon and a spray of atrocious artificial flowers; finally she threw over her shoulders a fluffy thing called a "cloud" in that day, which was of a blazing red complexion.
Above the temples, amidst wreathed turban folds of black drapery, vague in its character and consistency as cloud, gleamed a ring of white flame, gemmed with sparkles of a more lurid tinge.