luringly


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Related to luringly: alluringly

lure

 (lo͝or)
n.
1.
a. Something that tempts or attracts with the promise of pleasure or reward: the lure of the open road.
b. An attraction or appeal: Living on the ocean has a lure for many retirees.
2. A decoy used in catching animals, especially an artificial bait used in catching fish.
3. A bunch of feathers attached to a long cord, used in falconry to recall the hawk.
tr.v. lured, lur·ing, lures
1. To attract or entice, especially by wiles or temptation: Customers were lured to the store by ads promising big discounts.
2. To recall (a falcon) with a lure.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, of Germanic origin.]

lur′er n.
lur′ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: lure, entice, decoy, tempt, seduce
These verbs mean to lead or attempt to lead into a wrong or foolish course: Lure suggests the use of something that attracts like bait: Industry often lures scientists from universities by offering them huge salaries. To entice is to draw on by arousing one's interests, hopes, or desires: The new arrivals were enticed by the state's sunny climate and decent salaries. To decoy is to trap or ensnare by cunning or deception: The partisans caused a disturbance to decoy the enemy patrol into a crossfire. Tempt implies an encouragement or an attraction to do something, especially something immoral, unwise, or contrary to one's better judgment: "the argument ... that options tempt [executives] to corrupt behavior that no decent shareholder would wish to profit from" (Michael Kinsley).
To seduce is to entice away and usually suggests the overcoming of moral resistance: "The French King attempted by splendid offers to seduce him from the cause of the Republic" (Thomas Macaulay).

luringly

(ˈljʊərɪŋlɪ)
adv
in a luring or inviting manner
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References in classic literature ?
It was the call, the many- noted call, sounding more luringly and compellingly than ever before.
Those dining on deck 3 pass a row of posh Via Della Spiga Shops, where fashions of haute designers--Versace and the like--are luringly displayed (they have less expensive items, too).
But even then a figure, a dark shadow, his dead sister, moved ahead of him, lightly, luringly, up the ashlar steps and into the broken columns' mystery" (177).