lutetium


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lu·te·ti·um

also lu·te·ci·um  (lo͞o-tē′shē-əm)
n. Symbol Lu
A silvery-white element of the lanthanide series that is exceptionally difficult to separate from the other rare-earth elements with which it is found, used in nuclear technology. Atomic number 71; atomic weight 174.97; melting point 1,663°C; boiling point 3,402°C; specific gravity 9.841 (at 25°C); valence 3. See Periodic Table.

[Latin Lutetia, ancient name of Paris, France (where it was discovered) + -ium.]

lutetium

(lʊˈtiːʃɪəm) or

lutecium

n
(Elements & Compounds) a silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series, occurring in monazite and used as a catalyst in cracking, alkylation, and polymerization. Symbol: Lu; atomic no: 71; atomic wt: 174.967; valency: 3; relative density: 9.841; melting pt: 1663°C; boiling pt: 3402°C
[C19: New Latin, from Latin Lūtētia ancient name of Paris, home of G. Urbain (1872–1938), French chemist, who discovered it]

lu•te•ti•um

(luˈti ʃi əm)

n.
a trivalent rare-earth element. Symbol: Lu; at. wt.: 174.97; at. no.: 71.
[< French lutécium=Lutèce lutetia + -ium2]

lu·te·ti·um

(lo͞o-tē′shē-əm)
Symbol Lu A silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series that is used in nuclear technology. Its radioactive isotope is used to find the age of meteorites. Atomic number 71. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lutetium - a trivalent metallic element of the rare earth grouplutetium - a trivalent metallic element of the rare earth group; usually occurs in association with yttrium
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
Translations
lutetium
لوتيتيوم
лютеций
lutecium
lutetium
LutetiumCassiopeium
lutecio
luteetsium
lutetium
lutécium
lutecij
lutécium
ルテチウム
lutetium
lutetium
lutetium
lutet
lutécio
luteţiu
lutecium
lutecij
lütesyum
Luteti

lutetium

[lʊˈtiːʃɪəm] Nlutecio m

lutetium

n (Chem) → Lutetium nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Lutetium (177Lu) chloride, which provides the highest specific activity of more than 3,000 GBq/mg at Activity Reference Time (ART), whereas the day of ART can be flexibly selected by the customer.
2004) High 49) efficiency of lutetium silicate scintillators, Ce-doped LPS, and LYSO crystals.
We were essentially spray painting individual atoms of iron, lutetium and oxygen to achieve a new atomic structure that exhibits stronger magnetic properties," said Darrell Schlom, a materials science and engineering professor at Cornell and senior author of a study on the work recently published in Nature.
The rare earths metals or elements typically include scandium (Sc-21), yttrium (Y-39) and the lanthanides - lanthanum (La-57), cerium (Ce-58), praseodymium (Pr-59), neodymium (Nd-60), promethium (Pm-61), samarium (Sm-62), europium (Eu-63), gadolinium (Gd-64), terbium (Tb-65), dysprosium (Dy-66), holmium (Ho-67), erbium (Er-68), thulium (Tm-69), ytterbium (Yb-70), and lutetium (Lu-71).
Rare earths are 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically 15 lanthanides: lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, lutetium, as well as scandium and yttrium.
So, the only electron in hydrogen is located at the K level, starting with lithium, L-level appears, in potassium level M starts to be filled, N-level is fully filled in lutetium, and O- and P-levels are not completely filled in either elements of the Mendeleev periodic system [10, 11].
showcased its PET-CT system, which features a lutetium oxyorthosilicate detector for the PET unit and a 16-multislice CT scanner.
rare earth metals--set of 17 elements on the periodic table, from lanthanum to lutetium, plus scandium and yttrium
Twenty-first-century innovations have expanded the list of medical materials well beyond the traditional metals and polymers to include diamond (retinal implants), lutetium oxyorthosilicate (X-ray imaging), gold (diagnostics), shrimp shells/silk (sutures, biological scaffolds) and glass (bone repair).
As a major modification step, PMTs have been replaced with Avalanche Photodiodes (APDs) coupled with lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO).
Lutetium Lu 71 catalysts in cracking, alkylation, hydrogenation, and polymerization, detectors in positron emission tomography (PET) scans, X-rays.
Even the rarest, terbium and lutetium, are nearly 200 times more common than gold ("Rare earth elements: critical resources for high technology" 2002).