lycaenid

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lycaenid

(laɪˈsiːnɪd)
n
any butterfly of the genus Lycaena
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lycaenid - any of various butterflies of the family Lycaenidae
butterfly - diurnal insect typically having a slender body with knobbed antennae and broad colorful wings
family Lycaenidae, Lycaenidae - family of small usually brilliantly colored butterflies; males have short forelegs
blue - any of numerous small butterflies of the family Lycaenidae
copper - any of various small butterflies of the family Lycaenidae having coppery wings
hairstreak, hairstreak butterfly - small butterflies having striped markings under the wings
References in periodicals archive ?
Lycaenids are especially sensitive to micro-habitats in their specialized biomes because of their extreme vulnerability to changes in temperature, humidity, host plant density, and other elements in their environment; furthermore, they exhibit complex relationships with their adult and larval food sources (New 1993).
The data collected on the foraging visits of butterflies of each family showed that Nymphalids made 63%, Lycaenids 18%, Papilionids 9%, Pierids 7%, and Hesperiids 3% of total visits (Fig.
NEWS ON SIX RARE SPECIES OF LYCAENIDS OF COLOMBIA AND DESCRIPTION OF A NEW SPECIES OF BREVIANTA JOHNSON, KRUSE AND KROENLEIN, 1997, OF THE WESTERN COLOMBIAN MOUNTAIN RANGE (LEPIDOPTERA: LYCAENIDAE: EUMAEINI)
ballus, like those of other lycaenids, possess myrmecophilous organs (Downey 1987).
Lycaenids, also known as gossamer-winged butterflies because of their iridescent wings, are small-sized butterflies (< 5 cm).
In addition to this, the dry season female individuals of the lycaenids Hemiargus hanno and Cyclargus ammon have the metallic blue of the upperside of wings extended almost to the outer margin.
The larvae of many species of two butterfly groups, lycaenids and riodinids, sport glands that ooze a sweet liquid of interest to ants.
Lycaenids constitute 30 to 40% of all butterfly taxa and are endemic to often highly specialized and at-risk environments (New 1993; Minno 2012).
Moreover with a joint force and influence they attacked the "validity" of the name Annamaria beside other names also proposed for Neotropical eumaeine lycaenids (ROBBINS & LAMAS 2008b).
Fiedler (1991) suggests that the lycaenids may have diversified by keeping their primary association with certain plant groups (mainly representatives of Asterales) and by sporadically using unrelated taxa with chemical similarities.