lyre


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lyre

 (līr)
n.
A stringed instrument of the harp family having two curved arms connected at the upper end by a crossbar, used to accompany a singer or reciter of poetry, especially in ancient Greece.

[Middle English lire, from Old French, from Latin lyra, from Greek lura.]

lyre

(laɪə)
n
1. (Instruments) an ancient Greek stringed instrument consisting of a resonating tortoise shell to which a crossbar was attached by two projecting arms. It was plucked with a plectrum and used for accompanying songs
2. (Instruments) any ancient instrument of similar design
3. (Instruments) a medieval bowed instrument of the violin family
[C13: via Old French from Latin lyra, from Greek lura]

lyre

art at lytta
(laɪər)

n.
1. a small harplike musical instrument of ancient Greece used esp. to accompany singing and recitation.
2. (cap.) the constellation Lyra.
[1175–1225; Middle English lire < Latin lyra < Greek lýra]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lyre - a harp used by ancient Greeks for accompanimentlyre - a harp used by ancient Greeks for accompaniment
harp - a chordophone that has a triangular frame consisting of a sounding board and a pillar and a curved neck; the strings stretched between the neck and the soundbox are plucked with the fingers
trigon - a triangular lyre of ancient Greece and Rome
Translations
lyra
lyre
lüüra
چنگ
lyyra
lira
líra
lyra
lyra
lira
lira
lyra

lyre

[ˈlaɪəʳ] Nlira f

lyre

[ˈliːɒn] nlyre f

lyre

nLeier f, → Lyra f (geh)

lyre

[ˈlaɪəʳ] nlira
References in classic literature ?
The Delian hymn describes how Leto, in travail with Apollo, sought out a place in which to bear her son, and how Apollo, born in Delos, at once claimed for himself the lyre, the bow, and prophecy.
Zeus seeks to reconcile the pair, and Hermes by the gift of the lyre wins Apollo's friendship and purchases various prerogatives, a share in divination, the lordship of herds and animals, and the office of messenger from the gods to Hades.
And they say (the starry choir And all the listening things) That Israfeli's fire Is owing to that lyre By which he sits and sings - The trembling living wire Of those unusual strings.
Epic poetry and Tragedy, Comedy also and Dithyrambic: poetry, and the music of the flute and of the lyre in most of their forms, are all in their general conception modes of imitation.
Do not talk further," answered his animals once more; "rather, thou convalescent, prepare for thyself first a lyre, a new lyre!
Since I cannot sleep," she said, "on account of your song which, believe me, is sweet as the lyre of Apollo, I shall indulge myself in drinking some nectar which Pallas lately gave me.
Thus property is as an instrument to living; an estate is a multitude of instruments; so a slave is an animated instrument, but every one that can minister of himself is more valuable than any other instrument; for if every instrument, at command, or from a preconception of its master's will, could accomplish its work (as the story goes of the statues of Daedalus; or what the poet tells us of the tripods of Vulcan, "that they moved of their own accord into the assembly of the gods "), the shuttle would then weave, and the lyre play of itself; nor would the architect want servants, or the [1254a] master slaves.
If we really saw Erik, what I ought to have done was to nail him to Apollo's lyre, just as we nail the owls to the walls of our Breton farms; and there would have been no more question of him.
Loud rose the cry of Hymen, and the youths danced to the music of flute and lyre, while the women stood each at her house door to see them.
Still, there was no knowing when the dormant faculty might wake and smite the lyre.
As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink they wanted music and dancing, which are the crowning embellishments of a banquet, so a servant brought a lyre to Phemius, whom they compelled perforce to sing to them.
The proposition, in this form, will be admitted at once by those who love the lyre for its own sake, and for its spiritual uses.