lyrebird


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lyre·bird

 (līr′bûrd′)
n.
Either of two Australian birds of the genus Menura, the male of which has long tail feathers that are spread in a lyre-shaped display during courtship.

lyrebird

(ˈlaɪəˌbɜːd)
n
(Animals) either of two pheasant-like Australian birds, Menura superba and M. alberti, constituting the family Menuridae: during courtship displays, the male spreads its tail into the shape of a lyre

lyre•bird

(ˈlaɪərˌbɜrd)

n.
either of two large passerine birds of the genus Menura, of E Australia, the males of which have long tails that are lyrate when spread.
[1825–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lyrebird - Australian bird that resembles a pheasantlyrebird - Australian bird that resembles a pheasant; the courting male displays long tail feathers in a lyre shape
passeriform bird, passerine - perching birds mostly small and living near the ground with feet having 4 toes arranged to allow for gripping the perch; most are songbirds; hatchlings are helpless
genus Menura, Menura - type and sole genus of the family Menuridae
Translations

lyrebird

[ˈlaɪəbɜːd] Nave f lira

lyrebird

nLeierschwanz m

lyrebird

[ˈlaɪəˌbɜːd] nuccello m lira inv
References in periodicals archive ?
SPRINGBROOK LYREBIRD RETREAT Boasting a double spa bath, a fireplace and BBQ facilities, this jungle haven offers secluded cottages surrounded by rainforests.
Dyer (now Hanson-Dyer), and she carried with her several products of her newly founded press, The Lyrebird Press.
2014 Lyrebird Press, Melbourne Conservatorium of Music, Faculty of VCA and MCM, The University of Melbourne, 202pp.
At dusk, a bird call may not be from the one you identify, but rather from the very reclusive and clever mimic, the lyrebird.
FICTION LYREBIRD by Cecelia Ahern (HarperCollins, hardback PS16.
It was reported in Wild Life in 1939 that Ray T Littlejohns (famed for his work on the Superb Lyrebird Menura novaehollandiae and Mistletoebird Dicaeum hirundinaceum, and a president of the Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union) had been experimenting with the use of an automated camera with an 'open flash-lamp' in order to take pictures of the Yellow-rumped Thornbill Acanthiza chrysorrhoa in its nest.
Overtop the videos runs an audio track of an Australian lyrebird, a species that mimics the sounds around it.
The segment is devoted to the mimetic virtuosity of the male lyrebird.
Editions de l'Oiseau-Lyre (the Lyrebird Press) was founded in Paris in 1932 by Melbourne-born Louise Hanson-Dyer (1884-1962).
The Lyrebird can imitate a circular saw, nail gun, camera shutter and lots of other mechanical devices.
I discovered that the tale of Edith and the lyrebird never failed to put a smile on the faces of those I told it to and I began to wonder if the story could have a double life, as an illustrated book.
She has altered the song of the lyrebird, a natural mimic, to imitate the sounds of car horns, car alarms, and jackhammers, hinting that as the man-made environment encroaches ever more on nature, it modifies what we hear as much as what we see.